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May 18, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-18

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r

PACE FOUR

NAM

THE MIf-CIAN fDAILY

'TTF T)AY. 'MAN'$ 13t-1O4A . .VNA.C ..,JI.C . *~

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iU.LSttaLtil.Xi iYltlY ic7x 1:+.:r
NOW"

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Published every morning except MonAay
during the Universi year by the Boar in
Control of Student ublications.
Members of Western Conterence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
k lished therein..
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
waster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.se.; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
ward Street.
Phaoes:Editorial. 4g53 buulness, urs,4.
5DIORAL& RTAFIt
'elephons 4"1
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIT
Chairman. Editorial Board ....Norman R rThai
News Editor ........... Manning Housewortb
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor................Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama ......R.. obert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykks W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
' George Berneike
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Carleton, Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene 1. Gutekunst
ames T. HIerald
s Hitt
* Miles ]Kimball
Marion Kuhik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehoun
Margaret Parker
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko"
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
DRvid C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PAREER
Advertising ...........Joseph 7. Finn
Advertising............Rudolph,.-Botelman
Advertising................ im. L. Mullin
Advertising.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation ............. .. James R. De~uy
Publication............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts... .....Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Anable, Jr. Frank Mosher
W. "ai Bauer F. A. Norquist
John H. Blobrink Lo~leta G, Parker
Stanley S.sddington David Perrkt
W. J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A.Daniel -Wm. C. Ps1sch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Hiaves Win. J. Weinman
llarol'llIplmes Margaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson

THINKING TIME
Of all the factors that go to make
up what we commonly call an educa
tion, none is more important and at
the same time more fundamental than
the thinking time of the student. All
results of college effort on the part
of individuals or groups may be traced
directly to this single basis, and it is
only with a full realization of the
value of thinking time that a student
can succeed.
The mind has about sixteen con-
scious hours a day; in this time, all
the productive effort of the individual
must be accomplished; and while it
is true that a certain amount of time
must be consumed in solving the mere
incidental problems of existence,
there still remains an immense
amount which could be turned to pro-
ductive effort, and which the univer-
sity student should be the first to turn
in this direction.
If we count out the period which
must necessarily be allowed for recre-
ation and all other necessary mental
activity, there still remains , period
which, if properly applied, would dou-
ble the effectual output of the average
student. The thinking time that is
consumed in idle speculation on some
insignificant phase of surrounding
circumstances is sheer waste, and
should have no place in the program
of the student mind, if that organism
is to accomplish anything.
Thinking time is life itself. Every:
great human achievement is the re-
sult of the proper application of this
factor. University students, as repre-
senting the class most likely to ad-
vance society by its thought, should
be the first to recognize its import-
ance.
THE GREATEST C0OV
Few men enjoy the privilege of
'raising a cow which, by itself, is able
to destroy a great city. In fact, we
only know of one, and hi pasing a
few days ago, was practically uinark-
ed. Therefore, out of deference to
this one man out of the millions, we
reprint the following from the Boston
Transcript:,
Tis is the cow at O'Leary's back
gate
Where he stood on the night of
October the 8
When she kicked over the lamp
And set fire to the barn
Andcaused the great fire In Chi
cago.
And now the man, who bred the cow,
that kicked the lamp, that caused the
fre in 1871, is dead. le was William
L. Little, born on a farm in Chicago
in 1836. One of his cows was sold to
the Widow O'Leary at whose modest
home the great Chicago fire started.
A Michigan farmer fell heir to $1,-
600,000, and he is thinking of putting
in a telephone. High pressure sales-
Men will keep that line busy.
A radio conversation between Cool-
idge and King George is being ar-
ranged. We trust that they won't let
out any official gossip.
Although $720,000,000 was spent on
newspaper ads in 1925, not one cent
went to the readers who waded
through all the pages.
"National Parks In South To Be
Recognized"-headline. Yes, by th<
old tomato soup cans.
Our idea of a busy man is one who
tries to get a front seat at all the bi:
fights in Europe.

OASED ROLLV
GOODWILL
DAY

f'

mus

IC
AND
DRAMA

We must all be real friendly today,
and hold no hard feelings against
anyone, even the police force. For to-
day has been dedicated to "World
Goodwill" by the S. C. A. and the
Tolstoy leaguewho have at last found
something in common.
* * *
This is a good time to hold the Day,
now that the sophomores are conva-
lescing from their Spring fever, and
the freshmen are no more.
* s
We can't say this spirit of goodwill
goes so strong with us at the present
time. We just came from the dentist.
s* s*
If the Maj orchestra would only
get the spirit, and give us music all
the time, instead of just playing one
verse and then stopping to figure out
the rest of it.
TODAY'S PHOTO
CLICK-Student showing Dad,'87,
around the campus, "Oh, no, Dad,
they still hold Economics classes
there."
* * *
DEAFNESS PREVALENT
From observations at the Convoca-
tion Sunday we have compiled sta-
tistics which show, that 87 per cent
of the students are partially deaf, and
that more than 59 per cent are totally
without hearing. Such was the result
of a poll we took to find out how many
had heard the speaker.
s. s s

However he made some1
mets-one of the boys in
row heard several of them.

SENIORS nult us
s H
SENIORS i time no

fine com-
the front

One trouble was that the stage was
built out, so that the one place on it
where you can speak andbe heard by
the audience was several feet away.
Many tim4es we ,have wished that the
speakeis would stand ouiside- that
magic circle, but in this case we
really would have liked to hear him.
* * *

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 1926
Night Editor-JAMES T. HERALD
THE COLLEGIATE UTOPIAI
Amid the wrangling of educational
authorities-self-styled and pseudo-
about the commercialization of foot-
ball, the detracting effects of extra-
curricular activities, and the absence
of an intellectual curiosity in present
day collegians, attention is drawn tc
Berea college, at Berea, Ky., which is
seventy-five years Wld and has a ca-
pacity of three thousand students.
Here there is no intercollegiate foot-
ball, because ,of its expense; there is
no use of automobiles and no wearing
of silk articles of "clothing, because
these two commitments provoke social
competitions; there is no smoking,
because it is wasteful of money. In
fact, they make it possible for a stu-
dent to attend school for $150 a year.
The question arises as to how to
consider this school. Is it a forerun-
ner of the utopian college, or is it
merely a sectional freak, existing as it
does because of its peculiar situation?
The latter proposition is the more
probable of the two. Berea college
draws its students from the moun-
tains, from the so-called one remain-
ng "undiluted reserve" of true Amer-
ican blood, and its graduates shun the
world. The majority of them go, as
the president of the college asserts,
back again to teach in the rural dis-
ricts. They have no need to practice
social competition, for they will never
meet it. So their problenr is sectional,
and the means by which they attack it
should have no significance in con-
sidering the problem of colleges in
igeneral-
UNCLE SAM TEACHES
Five years ago the federal govern-
ment undertook to supply a needed
service and to teach an object lesson
to the American business man. That
nterprise is the now-famous, coast-
to-coast, air mail service, the suc-
cessful operation of which has demon-
strated the practicability of commer-
cial aviation.
Although partial realization of the
government's teaching may be viewed3
in the prospecti issued by many com-
panies during the last two years, con-
crete proof of the lesson is to be found
in the recent inauguration of air
service between Chicago and Dallas
* by one of the soundest of the con-
cerns which have indicated intentions,
of entering the field. Not only does

PURGING THE DAILY
"Chimes will in the future' be
independent weekly magazine
opinion, of criticism, distinct from
Michigan Daily."
* * *
OLD FRIENDS

an
of
the

FISH HORNS AND HARMONY
AT THE FIRST CONCERT
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock
SOLOIST
LOITISE HOMER, Contralto
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Im Fruhling".
.Goldmark
ARIA, "Non piu di fiori"......Mozart
SYMPHONY in B flat .... Chausson
ARIA, "0 Don Fatale .........Verdi
"THE PLANETS"...........Holst
ARIA, "Chanson der Tigre"..Masse
Mme. Homer
DANCES from "Prince Igor"....
..-............. .... -. Borodine
AT THE SECOND CONCERT
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock
SOLOISTS
MARIE SUNDELIUS, Soprano
JEANNE LAVAL, Contralto
CHARLES STRATTON, Tenor
THEODORE HARRISON, Baritone
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
PROGRAM
"ELIJAH".............. Mendelssohn
AT THE THIRD CONCERT
Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock
SOLOIST
ALBERT SPALDING, Violist
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
J. E. MADDY, Conductor
CHAMBER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
CONCERTO for Violin, D major..
... Mozart
CARNIVAL OF ANIMALS......
....................Saint-Saens
For two pianos and chamber orchestra
RONDO CAPRICCIOSO.. Saint-Saens
CANTATA:'
"The Walrus and the Carpenter"
.........Fletcher
Children's Chorus
VIOLIN SOLOS:
by Albert Spalding
AT THE FOURTH CONCERT
Friday evening at 8 o'clock
SOLOIST
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
HOWARD HANSON, Guest Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Juventus"...de Sabata
ARIA, "0 Paradiso" from "L'
Africana" ........... Meyerbeer
"THE LAMENT FOR BEOWULF"
(First Performance) ... .Hanson
ARIA, "Cielo e mar" from "La
Gioconda" ...........Panchielli
"ON THE SHORES OF SORREN-
TO" ....................'Strauss
RHAPSODY, "Italia" ....... Casella
NEAPOLITAN SONGS
SALTARELLO........Tschaikovsky
AT THE FIFTH CONCERT
Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock
SOLOIST
MISCHA LEVITZKI; Pianist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Baba Yaga" ..Laidow
"VERKLARTE NACHT"...Schonberg
SYMPHONY, No. 2 in D major...
Brahms
(in six movements)
CONCERTO for Pianoforte and
Orchestra in G minor..Saint-Saens
Mr. Levitizki
AT THE SIXTH CONCERT I
Saturday evening at 8 o'clock

SOLOISTS
FLORENCE AUSTRAL, Soprano. Elsa
AUGUST LENSKA, Mezzo-Soprano
.Ortrud
RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor. Lohengrin
RICCARDO BONELLI, Baritone..
.Telramund
JAMES WOLFE, Bass... King Henry
BARRE HILL, Bass-Baritone..Herald
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
PROGRAM
"LOHENGRIN" (in English).Wagner
* * *
THE HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS
A review, by Marian Welles.
A perfect bevy of hysterics! Beauti-
ful expressive hysterics! The youth-
ful actresses of Booth Tarkington s
"Travellers," in the exuberance of
producing Mr. Tarkington's play, tan-i
talized as was the audience by a light
that mysteriously went on and off,
easily burst into hysterics, easily and
we must say effectively. Americans
stranded in a strange hotel in Sicily
could not have acted better. It was a

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1 9

I

EDITORIAL COMMENT

I

i

ANOTHER DICTATORSHIP
(The Philadelphia Public Ledger)
The news from Poland can mean
only one thing: that another Euro-
pean nation has taken on a dictator-
ship-or rather, perhaps, has had a
dictator thrust upon it. Parlia-
mentary government has failed in Po-
land, just as it failed in Italy and I
Spain. A strong man, Marshal Pil-
sudski, leader of the Socialist Party
and darling of the army, has been
drawn into the vacuum-or jumped
into it, no matter which.
Poland's economic troubles have
been real. Trade and industry haveI
had a disastrous slump. Germany has
pressed on one side, Russia on the
other. Foreign capital in sufficient
amounts has been lacking. Frenzied
and inept Polish politics has coin-
pleted a vicious circle.j
Poland has exhibited the bloc sys-
tem at its worst. This method of par-
liamentary government usually goes
down in a crisis. With political par-
ties ani groupshopelessly multiplied,
no Cabinet could funictioii effectively,
no Cabinet could control the situation
long enough to find a solution. Poli-

I
I
7
1
t
I
3

It's a curious coincidence. You
know when I went home last June I
traveled in the day coach, partly be-
cause it's a good place to study hu-
man nature but mostly because I only
had two dollars and a Pullman ticket
costs three-fifty.
Anyway, I got on the L. and N. at
Cincinnati and so did a vaudeville
troupe. I kind of palled up with
them, and got acquainted (in a nice
way) with the leading lady. And that
vaudeville crew is the same bunch
that's playing at the Maj now.
What puzzles me is that when the
troupe got off the train at Louisville
the leading lady walked off with my
cherished copy of "Man and Super-
man." Nominally, of course, it was a
loan, but ever since I've been singing,
"Bring back, bring back, oh bring
back my Shaw book to me."
Yours for longer contributions,
YIFNIF.
So, this day being what it is, per-
haps the leading lady will return the
book.
* * *
TELEGRAMS REC'D TODAY.
Mr. Timothy Hay.
Dear Hay:
FIRST COPY OF "ROLLS" UNDER
YOUR GUIDANCE HAS JUST
REACHED NEW YORK STOP TOWN
MAD OVER IT STOP PLEASE EN-
TER MY SUBSCRIPTION TO DAILY
STOP
F. P. A.
Dear Hay:
FIRST COPY OF ROLLS UNDER
YOUR GUIDANCE HAS JUST
REACHED CHICAGO STOP TOWN
MAD OVER IT PLEASE ENTER MY
SUBSCRIPTION TO DAILY STOP
R. H. L.
** *
CHIMESANA
a magazine intelligent but not
dull, aggressie blit not didactic,
liberal but niot fanatic."
This is "Peace Week."
* *
But, it contains the May Festival.
-Timiothy Hay.
"U. S. Ships Half And Half"-head-
line. Erplimn that!
"Turning Smoke Into Perfumes,

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PHIL

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ANNOUNCES HIS
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AT
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