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May 18, 1926 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-18

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ESTABLISHED
.1890.

00

fri an

~1aiI33

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
)PRESS

-- --------

----------

t

VOL. XXXV. No. 170

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ALLIES' REFUSAL
TO ISARMVMIGHT
MEET OPPOSITION
NEIGHBOR'S STAND ON FORCES
TO DETERMINE GERMANY'S
ATTITUDE
GIBSON IS CHAIRMAN
First Meeting Of Preparatory Group
On Disarmament Will Probe !
Entire Problem

BALL TICKETS AVAILABLE
Remaining tickets for the Sen-
Iior b~all, which will be held Fri-
day in the Union ballroom, will1
be placed on sale from 2 until
5 o'clock today in the lobby of
the Union to any members of the
class of '26 who have not made
previous application.
Coon-Sanders Original Night
Hawks orchestra, under the joint
leadership of its originators,J
Carleton Coon and Joe Sanders,
will furnish music for the affair,
coming here directly from a two-
season run at Hotel Congress,
Chicago, where they have been
broadcasting nightly.

HESOLUTIONS WILL
BE DISCUSSED BY

ENGINEERING TEACHERS
DEBATE CHANGES IN
EDUCATION
TERMS ARE DEFI

WILL

NED

(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, May 17.-Will Germany
if her neighbors refuse to disarm, is B
the question putnat Geneva n1 te
eve of the great international effort to
reduce world armaments. For tomor-
raw with an American delegation col- .
laborating will be held the opening, Anti-Prohibitionists ssert That New
session of the preparatory. commission Enforcement Bill Is Admission Of
on disarmament which is expected to
probe the entire complex problem of Weakness Of Volstead Act
armaments, land, sea, and air, and if

possible prepare and exact agenda for
the later interntional conference.
Hugh S. Gibson, minister to Switz-
erland is chairman of the American
delegation while Count von Bernstorff,
former ambassador at Washington,
will speak for Germany.
It is reported that Count von Bern-
storff is freed from the restricted mil-
itary obligations of the treaty of Ver-
sailles and that Germany is permit.
ted such armament strength as her
position warrants, providing the
4eighboring states and especially
France decline to cut lown their
armaments so as to be responsible to
those of Germany.
The preliminary conference tomor-
row, which will be attended by official
delegates from 20 countries, is pri-
marily weakened by the defection of
Russia, which had assigned as the
reason for refusing to cooperate, the
fact that Switzerland refused ade-
quately to apologize for the assassina-
tion of M. Vorovsky, and the subse-
quent acquittal of the assassin, Con-
radi, This action is certain to temper
the enthusiasm of Russia's neighbors
to disarm, and particularly Poland
where Marshal Pilsudski is ambitious
to maintain strong and effective fight-
ing strength.
Another element which has engen-
dered pessimism over the deliberation
is the recent Russo-Germany treaty,
from which the allied powers read
Germany's intention as a future mem-
ber of the League of Nations council
to observe strict neutrality in connec-
tion with any outside conflict with I
Russia.
This treaty has increased the fear
in France and among the French al-
lies that in any new European con-
flict Germany's big population might
conceivably throw its weight with the
even bigger population of Russia, and
has augmented their conviction that
some more effective form of European
security than that formed by Locarno
must come into being before the west-
ern European powers can think of I
inaugurating any considerable Miminu-
tion of their effective forces.
POLISH QUESTION STILL
REMAINS TO BE SETTLED
L -
(By Associated Press
WARSAW, May 17.-While there is
an outward calm in the Polish capi-
tol, a complete settlement of the sit-
uation brought about by the ousting
of President Wojciechowski and the
Witos government by Marshal Pilsud-
ski has by no means been reached.
There is a difference of opinion on
the convening of the national assem-
bly for the election of a new presi-
dent, and Premier Bartel is having
some difficulty with his cabinet, for
it is announced that Count Skrzynski
has declined to accept the post of for-
eign minister, on the ground that he
does not consider Pilsudski's position
stable enough at the present time. It
is reported that Gen. Dombor Mus-
nicki refuses to accept the new situa-
tion and continues to march on War-
saw at the head of his troops.
Several regiments, which were sum-
moned from Posen to aid the Witos
government, still are lined up about
ten miles west of Warsaw, facing the
capital. All attempts of the Warsaw
government to induce them to return
to their garrisons have been futile. It
is asserted that the present congestion
of trains from Warsaw precludes their
transportation to Posen.

MEANS BACKS N4EASURE
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 17.-Theobat-
tle between the wets and the drys in
the Senate was renewed today with
the formal reporting of the adminis-
tration new dry law enforcement bill
from the judiciary committee.
In presenting the nmeasure Chair-
man Means of the sub-committee
'which held extended hearings on the
prohibition question declared it was
based upon the experience of that de-
partment in enforcing the Volstead
act.
Coincident with the submission of
the committee report, Senator Edge,
Republican, New Jersey, a leader of
the wets, issued a statement in which
he asserted that the new measure was
a "direct and unmistakable" admission
that the Volstead act can "never be
enforced." He added that the pro-
posed amendment to that act indirect-
ly encouraged law violation.
Senator Means expects to call up
the bill in the near future, but the
wets predict that it will not be passed
at this session. They plan to offer
as an amendment the bills which they
have 4ntroduced for modification of
the Volstead law.
While the Senate was receiving the
administration's measure, the House
passed and sent to the Senate a bill
authorizing an appropriation of $9,-
000,000 to be used in the construction
of 10 cutters for the coast guard
which is charged with controlling li-
quor smuggling from the seas.
In recommending the new enforce-
ment measures urged by Assistant
Secretary Andrews, in charge of dry
law enforcement, Senator Means said
it was not intended to interfere with
legitimate business, but was intended
to aid the government in its attempt
to eliminate illegal manufacture,. use
and sale of intoxicants.
University Sen ate
Hears Memorial
To A. C. Klocksiem
At its fourth regular meeting of the 1
year last night the University Senate
received the annual report of the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions which was submitted by Prof.
F. N. Scott of the rhetoric department,
chairman of the board.
A memorial to Prof. A. C. Klock-
siem, formerly of the English depart-
ment of the College of Engineering
and Architecture, who died a year ago,
was presented by Prof. J. R. Nelson
head of the department.
Prof. J. W. Bradshaw of the mathe-
matics department was re-elected sec-
retary of the Senate for the ensuing
year.
SAn informal discussion was held at
the request of President Clarence
Cook Little as to the tenure of asso-
ciate professorships. The purpose of
the discussion was to learn whether
the Senate favored the appointment
of associate professors for a specified
period of years, or the retention of the
present system of permanent appoint-
ments. No action was taken on the
matter; last night.
TENNIS TEAM.DEFEATS
STRONG CHICGO SOUAD
Michigan Loses Three Singles Matches
But Takes Doubles Easily

Recommendations Obtained From
Three Years' Work Are Ready
Tl Be Presented At Meeting
Culminating three years' study on
engineering education, three sets of
resolutions embodying the conclusions
reached will be presented for debate
at the engineering college faculty
meeting to be held at 4:15 o'clock to-
day in room 411 of the West Engi-
neering building.
By means of this discussion it is
expected to help establish the lines
along which progress and develop-
I ment should be made. The resolu-
tions which will be submitted at to-
day's meeting are as follows:
"Whereas the investigation of en-
gineering education, in which the lo-
cal committee is cooperating, was
prompted by the aspiration 'to develop,
broidden and enrich engineering-edu-
cation,'" it is resolved:
"That the engineering college find
some effective means of placing be-
fore the high school student a clearer
and more comprehensive picture of
the engineering profession.
"That the freshman 'assembly be
modified so as to bring before the stu-
dents at an earlier date than has here-
tofore been customary accurate infor-
mation regarding the fields of the en-
gineering profession; and to show
more clearly the dependence of engi-
neering upon science and the increas-
ing importance of the non-technical;
elements of the curricula.
"That, as a faculty we favor the
1 proposed freshman week as an addi-
tional effective means of bridging the
present gap between high school and
college."
The second group of resolutions is
concerned with obtaining a capable
teaching staff, and with establishing
an esprit de corps. It is recommend-
ed that regular staff meetings and
staff luncheons be made more frequent
I in all the departments, and that one
general social gathering of the en-
tire faculty be held at least once
during the academic year.
As a result of replies to question-
naires returned by graduates, the
third group of resolutions was draft-
ed as follows:
"That the period of instruction in
the engineering college be lengthened
to provide for the more liberal edu-
cation demanded by the profession,
and that changes be made in the cur-
riculum so as to provide for more cul-
tural studies.",
To aid in the debate on the resolu-
tions, the words, "cultural studies,"'
have been defined by the committee
as "studies which develop one's capac-
ity to understand life, which broad-
I en one's outlook on life and enrich
one's enjoyments of life, and which in
addition, tend to make the technical-
ly trained man more useful to so-
ciety."'
KRASNE WILL REPRSENT
UNIVERSITYIN CONTESTI
Philip N. Krasne, '27, will represent
the university tonight at Detroit in
the regional eliminations of the na-
tional oratory contest on the constitu-
tion of the United States which is be-
ing sponsored by a Los Angeles or-
ganization. Krasne won the state
title at a recent elimination contest
in Detroit. His subject is, "The Cor-
ner Stone of American Liberty.'
The orations tonight will be given
at the City college. Mayor John W.
Smith will welcome the aoros. Mu-
sic will be rendered by college glee
clubs.
Other schools who will be repre-
sented in the contest are: Ohio State
university, University of West Vir-
ginia, University of Marquette, Ohio
Wesleyan, Northwestern university,
Morningside college and Earlham
college.

ESSEN.-Five Ruhr industrialists,
including Herren Voegeler and Kird-
orff, whose homes were searched in
connection with the alleged Fascist
plot, have filed suit against the police
president of Berlin alleging malfeas-

Michigamua On
Warpath, Seeks
New Palefaces
When from out the paleface wig-
wamn
From behind the staring moon-
face
Come the slow and solemn five
booms
Telling that the Evening spirit
Wanders over woods and mea-
dows,
Lights the campfires of the heav-
ens,
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their war-
paint
Soon will gather round the oak
tree
Round the oak tree called the
Tap pan
Thereato greet the trembling pale-
face.
Many in number wait the bidding
Of the loud rejoicing redskins,
For before they take the long trail
To the home of Michigama
Many trials and many tortures
First must prove their strength
and courage
'Eremthe red man bids them wel-
come
'Ere he calls each paleface "In-
dian,"
'Ere the peace-pipe smoke goes
skyward.
RUSSEL ECTURE
GWN BY GOMBERGHo
Professor In Economies Department
Is Made Recipient Of Annual
Prize
IS FIRST ANNUAL AWARD
Inauguration of the annual Henry
Russel lecture and award took place
yesterday afternoon in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium when President Clar-
ence Cook Little introduced Prof.
Moses Gomberg of the chemistry de-
partment, as the lecturer and Prof.
Carter Lyman Goodrich of the eco-
nomics department as the recipient of
the award.
Ienry Russel of Detroit has given
to the University $10,000 for the pur-
pose of increasing the salaries of pro-
fessors who have "distinguished them-
selves in scholarship or authorship,
and also are conspicuous in their
abilities as teachers." The executive
committee of the Research club has
chosen the professors out of a pos-
sible field of 13. Both Professors
Gomberg and Goodrich will receive
$250.
Professor Gomberg dealt chiefly in
his lecture on the work of isolating
the organic radical. He went back to
the nineteenth century chemical his-
tory and told of the advance of or-
ganic chemistry by the work of Du-
mas, Gay-Lussac, Bunsen, Frankland,
Kolbe, and Kekule. In the work of
isolating the organic radical, Profes-
sor Gomberg has done valuable work
in such a degree that theResearch
club picked him from among the old-
er candidates of the faculty, since the
aim of the award is to choose an elder
member and a younger member of
the faculty.
Professor Goodrich has been chosen
for the award from the younger can-
didates. He received his A.B. from
Amherst, and his Ph.D. from the Uni-
versity of Chicago. He spent a year
in England doing research work and
came to the University in 1924. His
books "Frontiers of Control," a study
of British work shop politics, and
"The Miners Freedom," were consid-
ered in making the selection.

CONSTITUTIONAL ATO
'BE DISCUSSED BY DEAN

HOUSE APPR
S 30, 000, 00
FOR WAR YE
ACTION COMES AFTER
BATE; NO AMEN
ALLOWED BY R
DEMOCRATS
Opposition hints ThatI
Thrown Out TSmo
MIen In Election
(By Associated P
WASHINGTON, May
tion calling for expendi
000,000 in the next three
aid of 27,000 disabled w
erans was passed unani
by the House and sent t
Action came after one
with no amendments al
the rules, and after t
or~iginally providing fore
$40,000,000 had been sen
Veterans committee for
during the five monthst
before it.
The measure introduc
man Johnson, Republica
kota would extend for o0
July 2, next, the time fo
term insurance, remove I
the time for filing disa
and provide for completio
itation work under way.
Although the measure
posed on the final vote
membrs crammed into t
allowed them for debate
ting attack on the admin
Republican leaders In th
bringing the measure up
ation under a suspension
limited discussion and
amendments.
Representative Conner:
Massachusetts, assailed t
"sop" thrown out by the
tion to smooth the veter
tion years, while Represe
rett, the Democratic lea
that since the creation o
veterans committee all b
its approval had been c
a similar suspension ofr
ing free discussion in the
The chief sections of
measure deleted during t
committee considerations
providing for hospitalizat
cular patients on a larg
creation of a medical cor
erans bureau. The h
program, the committee
be taken care of in the n
schedule being drawn up
erans bureau.
The measure approve
would amend the veteran
in more than a score oft
ministrative points..
Slosson To Sr
Today On A
Goodwill P
Celebration of World
today will be featured by
livered by Prof. Prestom
of the history departme
League of Nations Dead
clock in Natural Scienc
As part of the programa
ture drama, "Uncle Sam
1 Ridge" will be shown.
This day was originally
der the title of Peace da
iginated in the United S
as a memorial of the o
first Hague conference o
custom gradually grew
outbreak of the World w
erally celebrated in man
pean nations.

a During the late war th
discontinued but, in 1923
restored to its former s
the World Congress o
meeting in San Francisco
was changed to Internati
day and set apart in 42

0 Y BIG TEN STANDINGSPc
10 hC I Michigan .........751I.S76
OA T~1 Illinois........... 5 3 .625
Purscnsn......5 2 .66
INorthwestern 4 4 .500
TER Ohio State 3 .50
Minnesota........ 2 3 .400
SHORT DE. Chicago.......... 2 3 .400
t SHO Indiana........... 1 5 .166
DIENT Iowa.0 6 .000
ULES
I Yesterday's Games
OBJECT I Michigan 5, Iowa 3.
InPurdue 4, Ohio 4 (Five in-
Bill Is "Sop" ings.
oth Army Wiscons 5, Illinois 2.
Year
ress)
17.-Legisla-P
iture of $30,-
years for theI
orld war vet-i
mously today
o the Senate.t
hours debate Reasons For Rejection Of Testament"
lowed 'under tenet Given At Third Sunday ,
he measure, Convocations
expediture of - -
t back to the SMITH OFFERS PRAYER ;
elimination
the bill wasI
Maintaining the reasons for the non-
ed by Chair- acceptance of the Biblical passage'
n, South Da- "For what shall it profit a man if he c
ne year from shall gain the whole world and lose s
r converting h'is own soul" to be the repression and '
ility claims asceticism imparted to it by commen-F
n of rehabil- tators and its opposition to the domi- i
nating tendencies of the age, Dr. Al- a
was unop- Bert Parker Fitch, of Carleton college, 1a
Democratic
he half hour showed its application ina&e recon-
an unremit- ciliation of the material and spiritual ,
istration and values of life in his convocation ad-i
e House for dress Sunday in Hill auditorium. Dr. Mf
for consider- Fitch spoke on "Having and Being."
of rules that The primary reason said Dr. Fitch I
prohibited why these words have little meaning r
for us today and why they are dis- ;M
y, Democrat, tasteful to us is that we put into them t
he bill as a some connotation of the repressive, 'v'
administra- negative, and ascetic, therefore we a
ans in elec- dislike th'em. This is rather silly. s
ntative Gar- Jesus was not a threatening person, h
der, charged nor one to warn or prohibit. He had
f the House a positive attitude. Jesus laughed with h
bills bearing those who laughed, he was a religious t
onsidered by humanist, thee was nothing repres- l
rules, "curb- sive about him. h
House'. Another factor, he said, is that these I V
the original words of Christ have been gradually r
he prolonged burdened with the comments and ad- P
were those ditions of others, the teachings of theS
ion of tuber- church and ministers of Christianity.
e scale and But if one really thinks deeply he will b
ps in the vet- not accept these secondary meanings, s
ospitalization it is silly to do so. Jesus did not de- i
said, would pend on a second-hand authority for o
ew disability his words, he disagreed with the
by the vet- scribes who pointed to their authori- t
ties. Like all geniuses his words were
I today also original, there was something self- 1
s act of 1924 verifying and convincing about thema
technical ad- to mind, heart, and will.
A third reason advanced for theird
non-acceptance is that they are in op-
leak Iposition to the dominating tendencies s
of the age, those of acquisition. Thee
.nnual majority of students, continued Dr.
Fitch, think of their future either in
rogram terN of executive force or material
I splendor. Therefore these words
Goodwill day make them feel uncomfortable.
a lecture de- Our problem is, then, the application
a W. Slosson of these words in a reconciliation of .
nt on "Is the the two values in life, material andI
?" at 4:15 o'- I ideal. Christ was a dualist, he be-
e auditorium. lieved that there were two sources of
a motion pic- values; the economic, real things, and
a of Freedom the ideal, spiritual, ethical, or intel-
lectual. Our problem is how to recon-a
observed un- cile them. Those who have gained the
y and was or- ! world's goods and yet do not under-
3tates in 1899 stand their spiritual meaning and the
pening of the forces behind their creation are com-
n May 18. The plicated and ornamental bores. Rusk-
until, at the in has the example of the maan in a
ar, it was gen-. shipwreck who drowned from - the
y of the Euro- ! weight of gold on his person which
he would not give up. Ruskin then

e custom was ironically asks, 'Did he have the gold
, the day was or did the gold have him?' It is im-'
ignificance by possible to own anything unless you
n Education, are bigger than the thing you own.
, and the title Jesus saw the world with pre-s
onal Goodwill E possession, he saw it as it is, which
countries of not one person in a million dares to
do. The man with a scale of values,
ged to World a sense of proportion, is the only
dew York city truly educated man. "I want the dis-
observing an tinction of a life of relative obscurity,"s
ch began last concluded Dr. Fitch, "as I grow older
I want to see more beauty in the
-_, world. When death comes, what have1
I got, unless it be a measure of kind-;
ness, love of man, and integrity?"
TRY T Ira M. Smith, registrar of the Uni-
versity, gave the prayer of the ser-
vice. William J. Skeat, graduate of
the School of Music was organist and
Julius Niehaus, S of M, sang. Thek
to tryout for convocation was the third planned and
legiate debat- sponsored by the Student council for
e debaters for students and facujty of the University.
mpetition will __
-i t-'.aP ri II

MICHIGAN STRENGTHENS
ON CONFERENCE LEAD
BEATING IOWA, 5-3

HOLD
BY

BIG6 TEN LEADERS
DEFEAT HAWKEYES
FOR SEVENTH WIN

EDGAR IS INJURED
Regular Catcher Suffers Split Finger
In Ninth Ining; May Be
Out This Week
(Special to The Daily)
IOWA CITY, May 17.-Michigan
strengthened her hold on first place
in the Western Conference baseball
race by defeating Iowa, 5 to 3, here
today. The victory marks the fifth
consecutive Conference win for the
Wolverines, and the seventh of the
season as against one loss.
Tess Edgar, stellar Wolverine
catcher, suffered a split finger in the
ninth inning of the game, and it is
doubtful if he will see service this
week. Edgar performed brilliantly i
he backstop position this season and
contributed to the team's offensive
strength with histtimely hitting.
injury is a severe blow to Coach Ray
Fisher's nine at this stage of the race:
Both teams scored in the initial
Inning, 'Michigan scoring three t- ne
ind Iowa twice. Each side score
gain in the eight frame, the Ha.-
yes sending two men across the plate,
while one runner scored for the
Wolverines. Iowa completedtthe scor=
ig, witha single run in the fiial1
rame .
Captain Wilson, who figured in )he
Illini game on Saturday with a home
un, opened the hitting with a double.
Viller, who pitched Michigan to a 9
o 4 victory over Illinois, followed
ith a single. Edgar senit both meiin
cross the plate with a three-b-,f
mack, later scoring the third ruL.
himself on a wild pitch by Corbin.
Pitcher Jablonowski, though not at
his best today, managed to weather
hrough until the final inning, and al-
owed the Hawkeye batters only three
hits, one o'nly going for extra bases.
Walters was sent to the mound to
rlieve Jablonowski. Walters also
played the role of relief pitcher on
Saturday when he relieved Miller.
Fielding sensations were supplied
y Oosterbaan and Puckelwartz who
snared catches that were well-nigh
mpossible. Both balls, had they not
been garnered by the two Wolverine
outfielders, would have gone for ex-
ra bases.
Davis, substitute catcher who re-
lieved Edgar in the ninth, did remark-
ably well, and will probably be be-
hind the plate until Edgar's injured
digit heals.
The games with Illinois, now in
second place, and Ohio here this week-
end, will be potent factors in the final
standing of -the season's conference
standing. Victories in both contests
will practically clinch the champion-

ship for

the Michigan nine.
BOX SCORE
Michigan
AB R

H

Loos, ss.........
Wilson,,lb.......
Miller, rf........
Puckelwartz, cf ...
Edgar, c.........
Kubicek, 2b....
Oosterbaan, If.
Friedman, 3b.....
Jablonowski, p
Walter, p........
Davis, c.........
Totals.........
lowl

4
4
5
4
3
4
4
4
4
0
0
36
Ii

0
1
1,
0a
2
13
0
0
0
0
0
51

2
2
1
1
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
12

PO A
1 4
12 2
0 0
3 0
1 0
3 1
1 0
1 1
3 6
0 0
2 0
27 14

E
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2

Heiserman, 2b ....
McNabb, ss......
Flinn, cf.........
Terry, f.........
Hoben, 1b
M. Smith, 3b
Beardsle, rf......
Miller, c.........
Corbin, p .........

AB
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
,4

R H PO
0 1 2
0 2 1
0 0 2
1 1 15
0 1 1
0 2 2
1 1 2
0 0 0

AE
1 0
51 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 0
0 0
1 0
5 0

"Some Contrasts and Comparisons the world.
of Canadian and American Constitu- The name was chang
tional Law" will be the subject of a Goodwill day in 1924. N
public address to be given by John is at the present time
D. Falconbridge, dean of Osgoode entire Peace week whi
Hall Law school, Toronto, Canada, at tThursday.
2:30 o'clock, Friday, May 21, in room
C of the Law building. DnniErIraniir
Mr. Falconbridge is coming to Ann
Arbor to speak to members of Coif,
senior scholastic society of the Law IL NE ED
school, at their annual banquet, to be L
held in the Lawyer's club on the
same date. He is characterized by l Students who desire
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law next semester's intercol
school as being one of the foremost I ing class from which the
barristers of the Dominion. He has I the Central league con
I- . -- -Pn Y a J T.. - - , (ho i n A n m i,- r- it

Totals..........38 3 9 27 15 0
Score by innings:
Michigan ...........300 000 020-5
Iowa ..............000 000 021--3
Summary:-Two base hits-Puckel-
wartz, Jablonowski, Edgar. Three
base hits-Edgar, Wilson Hoben.
Stolen bases-Kubicek, Edgar. Struck
out-By Jablonowski 1, Walter 2, Cor-
bin 3. Base on balls-Jablonowski'2,
Corbin 2. 'Hit by pitcher-Loos by
Corbin. Umpires-Clery and Costel-
lo. Time- :55.
Minerf To Speak

r'~ eaher 'an CHICAIG ,tay 17.--Michigan's te-
jnis team continued its winning by de-
a t , feating the strong University of Chi-

i

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