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May 16, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-16

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JESTABLISHED
18590

Iddloommom-

fri

~IaiI3J

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 169

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 16, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

-. ..._

Emoommillill 1111111111 No,

LARSON URGES
SONS TO WORK
EFFECTIVELYI

UNION BANQUET FOR
FATHERS' DAY DRAWS
ATTENDANCE

ANNUAL
RECORD

BATES, DAY SPEAK
Former Representative Emphasizes
Importance Of College
For Discipline
"Unless a man has learned how to
concentrate and to stick with his prob-
lein until he has conquered it, his
go lege education must be considered
a. failure," said Oscar J. Larson, '94L,
former member of Congress, in his
address last night at the largest
Father and Son's banquet which has
ever been held in Ann Arbor. Mr.
Larson stated that every father also
expected his son to acquire while in
college, the ability to work-and to
work effectively.
Mr. Larson's address came at the
conclusion of a program containing
several talks on the relations between
fathers and sons, and he contributed
'nother phase of the subject by tell-
ing "What a Father Expects from His'
Son in College." He stated that the
opportunity to have a cllege educa-
tion comes once in a boy's life and
that his father expects him to take
advantage of the years spent there. 1
"It is not worth while for a father
to spend $5,000 dollars on a 'fifty-cent'3
boy," he stated.
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school, who was toastmaster of the3
evening, was introduced by Paul Star-
rett, '27A, chairman of the committee,
and issued the address, of welcome to
the fathers. Dean Bates spoke to the 1
fathers about the spirit of youthI
which he had observed in his con-3
tact with them.
.This is true, he explained, because I
there has come into being the fruits
of the knowledge and experiments of!
te past centuries. "Then, too, there
has been ' certain loss of restraint3
which religion throws about us and a
change occasioned by the improve-
ments in mechanical means."
Following Dean Bates' talk, Dean
Edmund EV. Day of the School of
Business Administration gave the ad-
dress from the faculty. He began by
saying that youth today seems to be
typified by a spirit of 'self-determina-
tion.' "The attitude of teachers and
parents to this spirit ought to be one
of sympathy and understanding, al-
though," he continued, "there is a
brave danger in that it develops a
struggle between groups."
At the conclusion of Dean Day's
speech, Kenneth C. Midgely, '28L, ren-
dered several selections on the xylo-
phone. Following these, William L.
Diener, '26, retiring, president of the
union, expressed "A Greeting From
Michigan Sons," in which he welcomed
the fathers to a banquet where they I
might "meet their sons' friends and
appreciate the surroundings in which
their sons live while at Michigan."
Mr. Larson, in the main speech of
the evening, brought out some of theI
fundamental principles of life which
he has observed and which he said
night well be applied by the sons
while they are in college. "There is
no secret for success in life-life does
not require the performance of mira-
cles,'" he said. "There is only one
master formula-work. The success-
ful men have worked their way to the
mountain tops, while the ne'er-do-
wells remain at the foothills waitingE
for the elevator."
Her concludedhis remarks with a
quotation from William James to the
effect that "the purpose of education
is to learn to know a good man when
you see one."
Professor Ilussey
Discusses Stars
Clear skies enabled Prof. W. J. Hus-
sey, of the department of astronomy,
to give successfully a short survey
aided by telescopic views, on the sub-
ject "A Chat With the Stars", at the
Observatory last night, in which he
explained te various phenomena of
the universe.
Following Professor Hussey's lec-
ture, Dr F. S. Onderdonk, of the Tol-

stoy league, delivered a talk on "The
Effect of Astronomy on the Religion
of the Future."

IMANY HUNDREDS WOUNDED
IN WARSAW SKIRISES
{ (By Assoiatd Pes)
WASHINGTON, May 15.-More
than 100 people were killed and+
several hundred wounded during
the fighting in Warsaw between
Pilsudski's revolutionaries and
loyal federal troops, the State de-
partment was advised late to-
day by the American legation in
Warsaw. No American was
found among the dead or in-
jured.
A Havas dispatch from Berlin,
quoting a Warsaw newspaper,
says the fighting Thursday and
IFriday night in the streets of
the city was bitter. It estimates
that 200 persons were killed and {
about 1,000 wounded.
POISH OFFICIALS I
RESIGN AND FLEEI
President, Premier and Ministry Give I
Up Offices And Desert Warsaw1
Before PilsudskiI
PATRIOTS IN POWERx
(By Associated Press)l
WARSAW, May 15.- Confronted1
with saitguinary civil strife, the de-I
struction of the army, and the possi-t
ble invasion of the Polish frontiers,
President Wojciechowski lost littlec
time in making up his mind to resignc
from office. Premier Witos and hisu
ministry also resigned and followed i
the president in flight Friday night.e
A hastily convoked session of theI
ministry debated the question of fur-A
ther resistence to Marshal Pilsudski,H
who already held control of Warsaw, h
and who had occupied the principalo
public buildings. The president of i
the republic finally offered the pre-..
mier, and his fellow members in the e
abinet, a choice between oppositiony
to thevictorious marshal, or surren-
der.
A comminque issued by PremierN
Witos announced that the presidenti
and cabinet unanimously voted in fa-f
vor of surrender. President Wocie-
chowski then made his way out of thev
city, preceding to Wilanow, a fews
miles outside the capital.s
Marshal Pilsudski made the an-o
nouncement tonight that he does not
intend to participate in the new gov-
ernment, but will cooperate with M.C
Rapaj, president of the chamber of'
deputies, and Prof. Edmund BartelI
of the radical peasants, in the work of
forming a ministry composed ofI
patriots. A program of national con-(
centration and a ministry comprisingk
delegates of the left parties and ex-
perts in Pilsudski's plan. He pro-
posed to "stabilize" the army andI
carry out his measures in a consti-
tutional way. It is understood he will
retain only sufficient garrison troops
in Warsaw to ward off a possible
counter revolution which, it has been
reported, is being organized at Posen
by Generals Haler and Sikorski. t
- t
BOMBES TO IVE FIRST
HENRY RSSEL L[ETURE'
Speech By Cheistry Professor Will
Inaugurate Memorial Award
Prof. Moses Gomnberg, of the depart-
ment of chemisty, will deliver the
first of the annual Henry Russel lec-
tures in Natural Science auditorium
tomorrow at 4 :15 o'clock, according
to an announcement issued from the
President's office. The Henry Russell
award for the current year will be;

made at the lecture.
This year inaugurates both the
Henry Russel lecture and award, in
the memory of Henry Russel, who has
given $10,000 to the University for the
purpose of increasing salaries of pro-
fessors whose research work has
proved valuable. The executive com-
mittee of the Research club chooses the
professors for the lecture and the
award. The sum of $250 goes with
both the lecture and the award.
Goodwill Day To
Be Observed Here
World Goodwill day will be observ-
ed in Ann Arbor Tuesday at 4:15
o'clock by the presentation of a lec-
ture and motion picture drama under
the auspices of the Student Christian
association and the 'Tolstoy league.
I Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the his-

FITCH TO ADDRESS
STUDENTS AT HILLI

"HAVING AND BEING" WILL
SUBJECT OF SPEECH AT
THIRD CONVOCATION

IS CHURCH LEADER
Received Degree At Harvard Univer-
sity In 1900 And Union Theological
Seminary In 190
Dr. Albert Parker Fitch, of Carle-
ton college, Northfield, Minn., will de-
liver the address of the third Sunday
convocation sponsored by the Student
council at 11 o'clock this morning in
Hill auditorium. The title of Dr.
Fitch's address will be "Having and
Being."
Dr. Fitch is an ordained minister
and a liberal leader in the Congrega-
tional church. He received his A.B.
degree from Harvard university in
1900 and his B.D. degree from Union
Theological seminary in 1903. He was
ordained a minister in the Congrega-
tional church in the same year and
became the pastor of the First Con-
gregational church of Flushing, L. I
In 1905 he left this church for the
Mount Vernon Congregational church
in Boston. Meanwhile Dr. Fitch con-
tinued his graduate study and in
1909 received his D.D. degree from
Amherst college. At this time he be-
came president of Andover Theologi-
cal seminary in Cambridge, Mass.,
which position he filled successfully
for eight years. In 1914 he was award-
ed degree of D.D. from Williams col-
lege. Following his presidency at
Andover Theological seminary, Dr.
Fitch went to Amherst college where
he became a professor of the history
of religion from 1917 to 1923, resign-
ing with Alexander Meiklejohn. In
1919 and 1920 he was also tire Beech-
er lecturer at Yale university. Last
year Dr. Fitch assumed his position
with Carleton college. This is the in-
stitution where the late President
Marion Leroy Burton received his A.B.
degree in 1900 and later taught Greek
for two years.
Ira M. Smith, registrar of the Uni-
versity, will give the prayer of the
service. Julius Niehaus, S of M, will
sing and William J. Skeat, graduate I
of the School of Music, will be at the
organ. The program follows:
Organ Prelude.............Guilmant
Mr. Skeat
Hymn ........................ Nicea
Congregation
Prayer................Ira M. Smith
Offertory-
Solo-The Earth Is The Lord's..
.Lynes
Mr. Niehaus
Address-Having and Being-
Dr. Albert Parker Fitch
Organ Postlude-Scherzo (Sym-
phony V)G............uilmant
Mr. Skeat
Members of the Student council ex-
tended a cordial invitation yesterday
to the visiting fathers here for the
week-end to attend the convocation,
planned as it is, primarily for Uni-
versity students and faculty. The
service will begin at 11 o'clock.
FIVE HINDUS HURT IN
AUTMOBILE ACCIDENT;
Ford Ser ice School Student Is Not
Expected To Recover, Report
Three persons were hurt, one seri-
ously, and two others suffered minor
cuts and bruises as the result of an
automobile accident on Washtenaw
avenue at approximately 8:30 o'clock
Yesterday morning. The five men in-
jured, all Hindus from Highland Park,
were driving into Ann Arbor for treat-
ment at the University hospital.
The Highland Park car was forced
to the curb where it continued for
75 feet and then crashed into a tele-
phone pole when the driver attempted
to dodge a truck driven by George
Woodward of 1212 South University
avenue. The automobile was complete-
ly demolished.
Ajaib Grewal, a student in the Ford
Service school, received a fractured
skull, and according to a report from

the University hospital, is not ex-
pected to live. B. S. Grewal, the
driver is still confined to the hospital
due to severe lacerations and bruises,
while P. S. Thariwal was allowed to
leave after treatment.
Students To Visit
~-1 1 .. 1 4. .

BE

Gopher Tennis
Team Loses To
Michigan, 4-2
(Special to The Daily)
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., May 15.--
Victory in both doubles matches en-I
abled Michigan racqueteers to defeat
Minnesota four to two after two loss-
es in singles had placed the teams
on even terms. Crane playing in num-
ber one position was the first Wolver-
ine to meet defeat dropping two
straight sets to Shay, 10-8, 6-2. The
fast gravel courts visibly affected
Crane's play. Captain Krickbaum
came out of the slump, which. has
characterized his play in the last
three matches, and defeated Arm-
strong 6-3, 6-2. Krickbaum's steady
!drive and overhead game were de-
cisive factors on the fast court and
repeatedly drew the applause of the
gallery.
Leighton Stephens won the second
singles match for Michigan, easily de-
feating Tatham playing in third po-
sition for the Gophers, the score was
6-2, 6-3. Olian playing in fourth po-
sition lost his first match of the sea-
son after a close struggle to Wheet-
men 7-5, 4-6, 6-3.
Krickbaum and Crane took the
number of the doubles combination'
Shay and Armstrong, 6-4, 6-3. Steph-
ens and Vose won the final match of
the afternoon defeating Wheetman and
Tatham 6-2, 8-6. The Wolverines left
Minneapolis last night for Chicago
where they meet the Maroons on
Monday.
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR -MAY FESTIVAL1
Stage It Bill Auditoriunt Is Enlarged
And Final Rehearsals Arranged
For Choral Union Affair
PROGRAMS NOW ON SALE
With the completion of the recon-
structed stage in Hill auditorium and,
the arrangement of the final rehears-!
als for the Choral union, the Chicago
Symphony orchestra, and the guest
artists, the annual May Festival to be
held May 19-22 in Hill auditorium is
ready for presentation to the thou-I
sands of students, visitors and faculty
I members who willattend.
Thodam wichwil.a-( MTIA

DIRIGIBLE'S FATE
IN DOUBT AFTER
REACHING TELLER

l I
I
I
I
I

CITIZENRY OF NOME WAIT
VAIN FOR ARRIVAL OF
AMUNDSEN AND SNIAP

IN

n

BIG TEN STANDINGS
W. L.
Michigan ......... 6 1
Illinois ........... 5 2
Wisconsin ........ 4 2
Purdue............5 4
Northwestern .... 4 4
Ohio State ........ 3 3
Minnesota ......... 2 3
Chicago .......... 2 3
Indiana..........1 5
Iowa ..............0 5

RADIO INDISTINCT
Garbled Message Hints That Sudden
Storm Is Causing Norge
To Drift Away
(By Associated Press)
Frigid airways Saturday broadcast
the arrival of the dirigible Norge at
Teller, Alaska, 75 miles northwest of
Nome, dispelling the apprehension of
a watchful world as to the outcome
of tie first continent to continent
flight by way of the North Pole, but
the ether that told of the emergence
of the Amundsen-Ellsworth-Nobile ex-
pedition from the solid Arctic waste
sputtered out into static later in the
day and new doubts arose as to what
became of the Norge after reaching
Teller.
At Nome, a citizenry of a thousand
souls, many of whom knew Amundsen
personally-yawned and yearned. For
48 hours the town knew no sleep wait-
ing for the arrival of the gallant aerial
trail makers. Their eagerness to wel-
come the intrepid trans-polar naviga-
tor was symbolized in the narrow for-
lorn arch of triumph laboriously erect-
ed by volunteer workers who toiled
through the night to complete It.
As the hours passed, and no giant
airship loomed upon the horizon, some
who knew the great Norwegian of old
recalled his proneness to do the un-
expected, to startle by uncalculated
achievements.
At 10 o'clock Saturday morning, the
Norge had not reached Nome. Just
prior to the receipt of this news had
come a garbled radio message which
seemed to indicate that after reach-
ing Teller the big sky craft may have
started on toward Nome and have en-
countered weather difficulties. Re-
ception of the message was virtually
wrecked by static but the words "drift-
ing" and "wind storm" came through.
Again the ice-crusted North lapsed
into silence leaving the public uncer-
tain as to whether the expedition had
terminated its triumphs at Teller or
had chosen to extend them, and in
pressing on to Nome, has again filown
into danger. If, as some at Nome be-I
lieve, the latest development is but al
manoever, it is not the first spectacu-

I

Yesterday's Games
Michigan 9, Illinois 4.
Wisconsin 4, Minnesota
Ohio State 10, Indiana

3.
6.

Pct.
.714
.666
.555
.500
.500
.400
.166
.000

INDUSTRY NORMAL
AGAININENGLAND111
Premier Baldwin Leaves For Chequere .
Court To Spend Week End; Moret
Raivay Men Back At Work
NO BITTER FEELING
(By Associated Press)+
LONDON, May 15.-Premier Bald-
win has gone to Chequere court, his
country home, to spend the week-end.
This brief announcement tells the
story that the country is at peace
again.
Normal conditions are being resum-
ed and without waste of time theaters'
and other places of amusement have'
re-opened. Volunteer workers have
practically disappeared from the
streets.
Many more of the railway men re-
sumed work today, and some of the'
big lines were able to announce a full
service for tomorrow. The dockers'
have resumed at Southampton and'
other ports, but in some places there
are still awkward details to settle be-'
fore full resumption.
The government's coal proposals on!
the whole have had a good reception,
and although it is still not known
whether the miners or the owners will
acepet them, the feeling is hopeful
that an acceptable settlement will be
reached on them andtthat it may even
be unnecessary to take a ballot of
the miners on the subject.
The loading of ships at Cardiff, the
Tynside and the Clydeside is proceed-
ing rapidly.
CRISIE SPEAKS AT PHI
BETA KAPPAINITIATION~
Fifty-eight seniors, fourteen juniors
and one alumnus were initiated into
membership of Phi Beta Kappa, na-
tional honorary scholastic fraternity,
at the banquet of the Michigan chap-
ter held at the Union last night.
Arrangements for the banquet were
in charge of H. L. Caverly, grad., sec-
retary of the local chapter. The prin-
cipal speaker was Prof. W. A. Craigie,
of the department of English of the'
University of Chicago. Mary Eliza-
beth Cooley, '26, and Richard Fry-'
berg, '26, representing the initiates,
gave brief talks.
Miner Will Speak
Here On Tuesday
Dr. Carl S. Miner, director of the
Miner Laboratories of Chicago, will
deliver a lecture on "Furfural, the
Story of an Industrial Research," at
4:15 o'clock Tuesday in room 1042 of
the East Engineering building. The
talk will be given under the joint
auspices of the University and the
E local section of the American Chem-
I ical society.
Web And Flange

FIRST INNING
'9 ILLINOIS NINE
HUGE CROWD SEES MICHIGAN
TEAM WIN WITH MILLER
ON THE MOUND
- -
INFIELD BRILLIANT
Game Ends 9 To 4 After Wilson's
Home Run In Initial Frame Helps
Secure 5 Run Lead
(Special to The Daily)
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., May 15.-Michi-
gan downed Illinois today, nine to
four, before one of the largest crowds
that ever witnessed a Western Con-
ference baseball game. Ideal weather
prevailed. Miller did good mound
work in spite of his recent illness.
Coach Fisher removed Miller in the
ninth and Walter finished in good
fashion the game that meant a great
deal to Michigan's championship
hopes. The Wolverines began their
fight in the first, pushing over five
runs, a lead that was not to be over-
come.
Michigan scored her first run when
Worth bobbled Loos' easy roller mak-
ing him safe at first. Wilson then
followed with a circuit blow that sent
the horsehide out of the park. Lange
singled and Puckelwartz duplicated.
Major dropped Edgar's long fly and
both runners scored. Jablonowski
drove in Edgar on a sacrifice fly. Oos-
terbaan and Miller struck out, which
ended the inning. Stewart was
knocked out and Ludlam went in.
Major made a great catch of Puck-
elwartz' long drive. Michigan's in-
field performed in a most brilliant
manner and many times they made
what seemed impossible plays.
Michigan meets Iowa Monday with
her injured list decreasing.
Box score:

Michigan
AB

Loos, ss.........
Wilson, lb.......
Lange, lf........
Puckelwartz, cf.
Edgar, c.........
Kubicek, 2b......
Jablonowski, 3b ....
Oosterbaan, rf .....
Miller, p.........
Walters, p .......

4
5
4
4
5
3
3
4
4
0

t
1
1
2
2
2
0
1
0
0
0
J

1 n sag wicn.IIUixi aVI' nu ar esur
he members of the Choral union and lar gesture
But it is
he Chicago Symphony orchestra, who silence whi
will appear at several of the concerts, strategic m
has been built by a force of carpen- Isti ms
ers. The problem of seating the r It is coni
ers. ^ 75 resident.
nembers of both these organizations the visit o
vas solved at last year's Festival, and tavigato
he stage this year will accordingly navigators'
be built on the same lines.I craft to e
Other arrangements have also been mast, or so
nade. The police force. as in previous Conseque
years, will provide special traffic offi- fdight to N
cers in the vicinity of the auditoriunm ed upon, as
for the accommodation of the traffic rim tie z
and the special motor car busses lignts, air
which will leave after the concerts favorable t
for Detroit, Jackson and interveningthe failuret
points Extra, trucks have also beenthfalr
engaged to take care of the instru- prove due
ments of the orchestra, as well as the temperame
baggage of the artists. Official pro- Inte
grams have been printed containingpematert
the pictures of those appearing in the penetrate t
Festival, and the concert numbers1
that will be given, and are on sale at Will C
the bookstores or in the lobby before)
each performance. D
As a favor to the management, the
holders of season tickets are requested I n the
, .,_ __a_.Iima.thet.

of the flight.
not at all certain that the
ich has ensued is not a
nove for newspaper space.
dered improbable that the
s of Teller-unprepared for
f the distinguished aerial
-could draw the mammoth
arth without a mooring
me device for anchoring.
ntly the continuation of the
ome may have been decid-
nd a sudden storm in this
not unusual.
proximity of the northern
conditions are often un-
o radio communication and.
of communication may well
to nature's far northern
nt.
meantime, army, navy, and
tations are attempting to
he curtains of silence.
,onfer New
egree This Year
graduation exercises to be

Totals ...........36
IiInois

H
0
2
1
1.
4
0
2
2
0
0
19
,H
0
1
3
1
1
0
1
0
0
2
9

PO A
3 1
3 0
3 0
1 0
3 0
3 2
3 5
2 0
1 1
0 0
27 9
PO A
0 3
1 5
2 0
0 0
14 0
0 3
4 0
6 1
0 0
0 2
27.14

E;
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2.
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2

Jo
K
M
H
F
M
K
S
}Li

AB
orth, 3b.........5
)rdan, 2b..........4
inderman, If.....5
argolis, rf4......4
offman, lb.......5
inn, ss.........
ajor, cf.........3
usinski, c........4
tewart, p........0
udlam, p.........4
Totals-..........37
Score by innings:

R
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
4

to detach the proper stub for theh n m , l ,
concert befomredrrivaltnl tieaudGlis
concrt bfor arrval t te an,.-26E, will be the first student of the
tomium in order that confusion may engineering college to complete theI
be avoided. Patrons are also request- combined curriculum between engi-
ed to refrain from leaving the build- neermg and business administration,
ing by the Thayer street exit. A and to receive the new degree of
pay station will be installed in the bachelor of science in engineering,
main lobby for the convenience of 1(mechanical and industrial engineer-
guests. ing). The course leading to this de-
gree requires 176 hours of credit in
NEW YORK.-Owing to continued i comparison to the 140 hours for the
illness, Ignace Jan Paderewski, Polishi four. year engineering course, and con-
pianist, has been ordered by his physi- tains additional courses in economics,
cians to cancel his remaining engage- business administration and shop
ments this season. management.

tI
1
i
.I

Lantern Night, With Innovations,
To Be Observed By Women Tuesday
Starting with a picnic supper at en as representative women on the
15:30 o'clock, Lantern night, the most i campus. Thi's year the entire block
important women's tradition, will be "M", which is formed during the pro-
I cession, will be lighted by lanterns.
celebrated Tuesday at Palmer field. No athletic awards will be made at
This fete, which marks the unofficial this point, as previously done. In
advancement of the classes, will con- their place,publicannouncement vill
sist of the annual program of class I be made for tie first time of the ee-
stunts, a freshman pageant, and the j tions to honor societies - Mortar
- . .- . ,. IBoard. Senior society and Wyvern.

ivames Initates
Web and Flange, honorary senior}
Civil Engineering society, announced
the initiation of the following men
yesterday: R. C. Baker, '27E; Clayton
Bredt, '27E; P. C. Cooke, '27E; F. H.
Beckwith, '27E; R. A. Davidson, '27E;
L. D. Ewen, '27E; L. F. Finkler, '27E;
C. A. Grieling, '27E; L. G. Heston,
'27E; J. H. Lovette, '27E; W. A. Kuen-
zel, '27E; K. C. McIntyre, '27E; and
M. F. Ohr, '27E.
More Senior Ball
Tickets On Sale
Due to the delayed announcement
of the Senior ball ticket sale, a few
more tickets will be offered tomor-
row afternoon from 2 to 5 o'clock at
the side desk in the Union. This sale

Michigan..........501 030 000-9
Illinois........... 010 001 002-4
Two base hits-Jablonowski, Edgar,
Kinderman. Home runs-Wilson.
Sacrifice hits-Jablonowski, Kubicek.
Stolen bases-Miller, Kubicek, Edgar.
Struck out-By Miller, 2, Ludlam 5.
Base on balls-Off Miller 2, Walter 1,
Ludlam 1. Hit by pitcher-Lange,
Puckelwartz, Loos, by Ludlam.
MISS WHEELER
IS WINVER OF
ORA TOR Y HONOR
Geneva Wheeler, 26, won the At-
kinson Memorial oratory medal and
testimonial of $50 Friday night in the
auditorium of University hall when
her oration, "Wings,"- was adjudged
the best of the five delivered in the
contest finals. David A. Howell, '26,
was awarded the second prize of $25
for his oration entitled "A Criminal
Utopia," and Harry Seligson, '26, who
spoke on "Student- Character for
World Citizenship," was given honora-
ble mention.
C. C. Atkinsom of Battle Creek, who
founded the contest in honor' of his
son C. Maurice Atkinson, '22, who was
killed in- an auto accident here on
the day of his graduation, presided
over the contest and presented the
prizes to the winners at its conclu-
sion.
To Begin Work On
Wisconsin Union

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