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May 13, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-13

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IPAOE MUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TI3URSDAY :M A1 13, 19:IG

PAOE I'ouI~ I ThURSDAY, MAY 13, 1926

Published every morning except Mowlay
during the University year by the Boa in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwiseI
eredited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor.
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
.f postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mlaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $345o; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices:.Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
aard Street.
Phoas EditorIal~ 4g2; usiess, 0s34e.
3DITOWLAL RTAI
Ielephous £sia
MANAGING EDITOR
OEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board... .Norman R. Thal
News Editor..........anning Housewortb
Women's Editor............Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor ..............Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor........... William Walthour
Music and Drama.......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykka W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

thousand of them have done for five
years, the smaller will be the sum
which may be realized from this
equipment. In short, unless the ad-
ministration insists upon the policy
of promptly making sales which in
the judgment of the shipping board'
are financially sound, this ''whiteele-
phant" will be on the hands of the;
American people for some years to
come.
THE AUTOMOBILE, A ROMANCE
Four billion dollars is the invest-1
ment Americans make annually in
motor cars. However, computed in
another way, this investment is even
greater. It means fortunes in pleas-
ure, recreation, anda richer .life,-to
those who use it'properly.
The growth of the motor industry
is easily one of the romances of
American business. Beginning in
1895, when there were perhaps nol
more than 300 motor cars in the
United States, the industry reached
its ascendancy in 1925, when about
21,000,000 cars were licensed; this
year, more than likely, even this fig-
ure will be eclipsed. The four bil-I
lion dollar annual investment has
come about with the development of
large scale production methods, high
powered advertising, and standard-
ized parts, which, in turn, have made.
fairly low prices the rule rather than
the exeepti'on.
Mil ions of ,men are mployed in
meeting the nation's demand for mo-
tor cars, but even greater numbers
a're busied in allied trades which
make possible an annual motor bill
of billions. Just how tremendous this
is, is indicated by the fact that 84 per
cent of the nation's rubber supply
goes to the automobile trade. Eight
and a half per cent of the country's
steel product, 50 per cent of the plate
glass output, and 10 per cent of all
the employed labor in the country
likewise aid in the making of the
American automobile.
On the other side of the ledger is
tragedy, vice, licentiousness, wrecked
lives, and maimed motorists. For
some the automobile is responsible;
the rest may be charged to human
stupidity, to its carelessness and ig-
norance.
"Members Give N. Y. Chamber Mel-
lon Picture"-headline. Is it the kind
they carve?

THE
WETS
OFFICIAL BALLOT
Results Of
All Campus Election, Wed. May 12
MICHIGAN UNION
(All Men Vote)
Vote for One
PRESIDENT
( ) E Mortimer Shuter
( ) Mike Ames
(X) Julian Eltinge
RECORDING SECRETARY
( ) Thompson Starrett Co.
( ) Joe Dictaphone
(X) Victor Orthophonic
LITERARY VICE PRES.
( ) Joseph Zilch
( ) Simon Legree
(X) Abie S. Irishrose
ENGINEERING VICE-PRES.
( ) John M. Swillsnitcher
(X) Leone Leoni
LAW VICE-PRES.
( ) O. Henry Scheiste-r
(X) Leopold Loeb
MEDIC VICE-PRES.
( ) Joe. Jekyll
(X) Mr. Hyde
s O INED VICE-PIlES
( ') atrick McLevi'
(X) B. V. D. Munsingwear
STUDENT COUNCIL
I'RESIDENT
( ) Thomas:Cocoa
(X) Nihil Nemo
) E. Wouldbe Emmee
SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
( ) J. J. Whoknows
( ) D. C. Nevercentel
( ) G. C. Whocares
(X) Neader Thal
(X) E. Hamilton Mipp
JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES
) J. J. Whoknows Jr.
{ ) D. C. Nevercantel Jr.
(X) G. C. Whocares Jr.
( ) Neader Thal Jr.
( ) E. Hamilton Mipp Jr.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
WNilliam Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
.bAtaon Ruck
Carl Burger
E dgar Carter
Joscph Chamberlain
arleton Chamipe
tiouglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
fames T. Herald
Russell Hitt
,M , iles Kimball
Marion Kubik
' arriet Levy

Ellis Merry
Dorothy.Morehouso
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps.
Archie Robinson
Simon rRosenbauta
Wilton Simpson
]anet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

BUSINESS STAFf
Telephone 31214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising............. .Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..............Rudoh Botelman
Advertising............. m. L. Mullin
Advertising ......... Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation...............James R. DePuy
Pubtlication .............Frank R. Dentz. Jr.
Accounts. .............Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable Jr. Frank Mosher
.W. Carl Bauer F. A. Norqult
Johii . .Bobrink Loleta G. FPrkes
Stanley S. Coddington David Perrot
W. J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Havess Wm. J Weinman
clarold Holmes Nargaret Smith
Osicar A. Jose Sidney Wilson

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THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1926
Night Editor-SMITH I. CADY, JR.
GOOD SENSE AND REASON
The British general strike is over.
In nine days, England virtually set-
tled a strike involving 5,000,000
men, as opposed to the 164 day strikeE
of 158,000 men in the United States.
The English laborers were' ready
enough to agree on a program of ar-
bitration, the Americans specified
that the difficulties "may" be arbi-
trated.
Perhaps there is good foundation
for the assertion that the 'British
laboring classes are superior to our
own. Surely in this instance they
proved themselves more susceptible
to good sense and reason. Or perhaps
t is that they exercise mnore discre-
tion in their choice of leaders.
The British laborers have, in nine1
short days, shown their power; the
same may be said for the govern-1
ment. The government has given in
to the extent of renewing the coal
subsidy "for such reas'on'able time
as may be 'reqnired." The govern-,
ment has also agreed to establish,
r+ certain boards of revision and arbi-
tration. But the government granted
nothing until the workers agreed to
resume operations and to trust all
disputes to these arbitration boards.
The British strike is over. And
because they exercised good sense,
the workers have really won. Ameri-
ca can afford to study this object
lesson.
T HE Ea " SiTE E FPAN9 T"X* MVES

I

EDITORIAL COMMENT

( )
( )
(X)
(.)
(X)
( )
(X)
( )
(X)

(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
William Jennings Bryan
Henry Clay
W. D. Henerson
VICE PRESIDENT
Oscar Demosthenes
Dr. Lovell
SECRETARY
Maizie Blue
Lorelei Blondes
TREASURER
Thomas Cocoa
H. Slicker Sniffer

MUSIC
AND)
K DRAMA
(Editor's Note: The following Mu-
sic and Drama column has been writ-
ten and edited by Vincent Wall.)
IN THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Marguerite Shattuck and Phyllis
Brown, pupils of Guy Maier, will pre-
sent a piano recital Friday evening at
8 o'clock in the School of Music audi-
torium
Two Preludes ...............Chopin
Prelude and Fugue in D major..,Bach
Sonata Pathetique........Beethoven
Andante Cantabile
Grave; Allegro Motto
by Miss Brown
Waltzes, Opus 39, Numbers 1, 2, 3,
4, 6, 8, 11, 15...... . ......Brahms
by Miss Shattuck
"Lotus Land" .................Scott
Prelude, from "Carnival Mig-
nonne" ........:.......Schuctt
Nautilus, from "Sea Preres"....
.... .............M acDowell
Seguedilla .................. Albeniz
by Miss Brown
The 'Juggling Girl......Moskowski
intermezzo, Opus 118, Number 2
....Brahms i
Etude in C minor .........Chopin
by Miss Shattuck
*. a *
THE LADIES CANTATRICES
Following a brilliant season in
dramatics and on the concert stage,
the anual May Festival to be given
May 19, 20, .21, and 22 in Hill audi-
torium will bng to a close the dra-
matic and concert season in Ann Ar-
bor. The list of divas includes some
of the most famous and interesting
Ladies of the Opera. For instance we
have:
HOMER, who has been a figure
prominent in the American Opera
since her debut with the Metropolitan
in 1900, and on the continent since
her premiere at Vichy, France. She
is the wife of Sidney Homer, the
maestro, and is certainly one of the
greatest contraltos of all time.
LENSKA, who is a mezzo and has a
range that thrilled at the May Festi-
val last season when she played Laura
in Poncielli's "La Giaconda." Madame
is famous in Wagnerianroles as well
as for her Azucena, her Madelon, her
Prika and her omindus Otrud which
she will do in the Wagner "Lohen-
grin."
AUSTRAL, an Australian-British
dramatic soprano, who has made a
reputation for herself without the aid
of a fortune spent in publicity, like
Talley, or a press agent like Frankie
La Forge. She will play Elsa to
Crook's Lohengrin.
LAVA"L, who is a contralto, an
oratlo sinaer and who will do the
Mendelssohn. Elijah" with Theodore
Harrison, brtone, and finally
SUNDELIUN, who is another Swed-
ish nightingale, a second Jenny Lind,
a Christine Nilsson, or what you will,
but in any event is one of the most
interesting characters in modern
opera. Her Marguerite set New York
by its ears, and as Micala in "Car-
men" and Inez in "L'Africana" she
swept the critics into panegyrics by
the beauty of her voice, her poise and
her vivid performance.
' ' * * *
"TlHE CHINESE LANTER'
The senior class of the Ann Arbor
high school will offer "The Chinese
Lantern" by Lawrence Housman at

8:15 o'clock on Friday, and Saturday
evenings of this week. The following
cast has been selected by June Knise-
ley Simpson, who is directing the pro-
duction:
Mee Mee...........Blossom $acon
Tikipu ...............,Vernon Dick
Olangsti...........Wendel Mahaffy
Mrs. Olangsti ........Huldah Shafer
Yunglangsti.........Edwin Elliott
Wiavani ............Ralph Bettison
Josi Mosi...........Jo Zwerdling
Cosi Mosi ...........Ralph Bettison
Hiti Titi .......... Charles Kingsley
New Lin ..............Walter Sauer
Nau Lee...........Melvin Jacobus
Lee Pee .............. Gerald Luck
Li Pong.........Catherine Backus
Crier ....... ........Walter Hickey
Han Kin..........Selma Arespach
* * *
SHOWS AND THE SHOW-OFF
As for the conclusion of the season
in New York, Burns Mantle, who is
one of the most industrious students
of the drama and author of the "Best
Plays" series, recommends "The
Enemy," "Craig's Wife," "The Green
Hat," "Young Woodley," "The last of
Mrs. Cheyney," and "The Butter and
Egg Man."
* * *
"No, No, Nanette" having scored a

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? n THE FAR31 BILLS
(The New York Tines)
The three bills in aid of farmers,
which were tossed into the House by
the Committee on Agriculture without
recommendation, have fared badly in
the course of the debate..Though the
discussion is to go on this week, the
strong conviction in Washington is
that they will all be defeated: A
heavy blow was dealt theim by Repre-
sentative Madden when, speaking for
the Committee on Appropriations, he
said that he did not know where the
money was to be found for any of
them. Particularly is the outlook dark
for the Haugen bill, which calls for
an initial appropriation of $375,000,-
000. That would at once mean a
Treasury deficit, with new taxes or
else new borrowings. In addition, the
operation of the Haugen bill would be
directly to increase the cost of living.
This was frankly admitted, in an-
swer to a question, by Representative
i-Haugen himself. ,A deficit, higher
taxes and a rise in the prices of food
form a combination which scarcely
can be called attractive from the point
of view of the majority of the people.
The proposed legislation is con-
fessedly in the interest of a class. It
is, to be sure, a class which feels that
it has been discriminated against by
existing law. The farmers, or their
spokesmen in Congress, assert that
they suffer under the protective tariff.
Its benefits are distributed to favored
interests. The farmers say that it is
time the lawmakers handed to them
their share of benefits. These they
cannot get through protective duties
on imports, and so they are demand-
ing them in the form of special legis-
lation. It would, seem that if they
do not obtain this according to their
desire, they would be bound to turn
and rend the high tariff. Some of
them, in fact, threaten to do this and
to make their fight on political grounds
rather than on economic.
So far as Congress is concerned, the
effort to "do something for the farm-
ers" is almost purely political. This
is the main reason why the Senate
protests that it cannot adjourn before
the middle of June. Even Senatars
who acknowledge that no farm legis-1
lation can be enacted at this session,
especially if the House remains in its
present mood, announce that they in-

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STUDENT CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION
PRESIDENT
( ) Herbert Jump
(X) Billie Sunday
Those who vote for this office ex-
press themselves as in doubt as to the
influence of the S. C. A.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
(Entire Campus Vote)
(X) E. Woldbe Emmee
(X) Robert W. Allaye
(X) Lewis L. Fiebate
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
ATHLETIC
(X) E. Hamilton Mipp
(X) T. J. Hopp
* * *
LEFTOVERS FROM MOTHER'S DAY
It is a peculiar circumstance that
so many girls, whose fond mammas
visited them over the weekend wore'
their longest dresses when they en-
tertained their, parents. The campus
Sunday looked like 1915 instead of
1926.
* * *
It seems they caught the gentle-
man who was breaking up all the
spooning at Ferry field. Some other
car happened to be passing, and
phoned the police, who apparently
caught the boy just as he was about
to lie down for a few hours rest. It
just goes to prove that no crooked
work is as easy as it sounds.
* * *
NOTICE
There was surprisingly little cam-
paigning around the polls. No bribes.
were in evidence and no guns or
other weapons were used to argue
students into voting for the right can-
didate. The only methods used were
to have four to ten men approach each
voter and pester him into voting for
their candidate.
A near riot was caused when a
freshman sat upon the library steps
to read a letter from home, which was
mistaken by campaigners for a ballot,
and was nearly killed by the rush of

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Through its various committees and
the publicity given to their findings,
the Senate has brought to light many
conditions which are harmful to
democratic government. However,
in the present investigation of the
proposed dale of five government-,
owned ships to the Robert Dollar in- I
terests, the commerce committee of
that august body seems to have shown
too much inquisitiveness. The ship-
ping board,' which is authorized to,
dispose of this vast fleet constructed
during the war at any price "consis-
tent with good business methods,"
has proceeded with all reasonable
caution. Only after the sale had been
advertised in all sections of the coun-
try, and after the Robert Dollor com-
pany had submitted a new bid to re- I

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