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May 13, 1926 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-13

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ESTABLISHED
1890

JrEMUN.

t1an

tig

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

f

1111

VOL. XXXVI. No. 166

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

i
+ .

--------

C

G

AML
i

F. " k r1
i
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IL

PRLSIDE;

General Strike

In Britain

Is

Ended'

JOHNSON. IS

CHOSEN

COAL
RE!
PECWILL

I

IORKERS
I OUT;
EFFORTS

Peace Leader

Ro LIE V O

BH

TROOPSl

IT: MARTIAL;
DECLARED:
Y INJUREDI

CONTINUE

MANY DIFFERENCES AMONG
DUSTRIES YET TO BE
SETTLED

IN.

NATION IS JOYFUL
Workers In Some Sections Refuse To
Return Until Government
Control Is Removed
(By Assocated Press)
LONDON, May 12.-Great Britain's
gigantic industrial strike, a test of
Ondurance which lasted 9 days, is end-
ed. The general council of the Trades
Union conference, heeding the efforts
of Sir Herbert Samuel, chairman of
fhe Royal Coal commission, as private
mediator, today withdrew its order for
a sympathetic strike of the Trades
Union in support of the coal miners.
T;e coal miners remain out, but
with the asaurance of Premier Bald-
iin that no stone will be left un-
turned to bring the interrupted ne-
gotiations between the miners and
mine owners to a conclusion satis-
factory to all.
Work Is Resumed
Now, the nation that has borne with
good humor and Spartan fortitude the
inconveniences and annoyances in-
evitabie to any general stoppage of
industry, is preparing to pick up the
pieces and count the costs.
Work is being slowly resumed
throughout the country tonight. There
are still many differences to be ad-
justed before industry can be in full
swing again. First there is the ques-
tion of the engagement of men who
have been notified that their places
are filled; then too, groups in various
sections have announced their unwill-
ingness to resume work until the gov-
ernment emergency control is entire-
iy removed.
But on the whole, the nation has
joyfully accepted the end of what the
Trades Union congress, with reason,
has characterized as one of the -most
grderly stoppages in the history of in-
dustrial disputes.
Peace Was Rumored
For the preceding 24 hours there
has -been much talk of peace; rumors
were current that- strong influences
were at work to bring the government
and labor leaders together, and last.
night there were important confer-
ences between representatives of the
miners and men highest in authority i
in the Trades Union congress.
Premier Baldwin and his ministers
awaited a call from the Union leaders
until after midniglt, but it was not
until noon today that the delegation
proceeded to 10 Downing street, the
Premier's official residence.
LONDON, May 12.-Sir Herbert
Samuel, as chairman of the royal
commission which made the report on
the British coal industry about which
the conflict centered, was the natural
go-between in the settlement of the
general strike.
His memorandum, which the ge-
eral council of the Trades Union
congress accepted as a basis for call-
ing off the general strike and resum-
ing negotiations on the controversy,
contains the following points:
First-The coal subsidy is to be
renewed for such reasonable time
as may be required.
Second-Creation of a national
wages board, including represen-
tatives of the miners, mine own-.
ers and neutrals, with an inde-
pendent chairman to revise the
miners' wages.
Third-it is understood there
shall be no revision of the pre-
vious wages without sufficient as-
surances that reorganization of
the coal industry as proposed by
the Toyal commission shall be
executed.

Stanley Baldwin
British premier, who is making ef-
forts to reconcile the leaders of theI
miners, who are still on strike in
spite of the settlement of the general
strike yesterday.
DESIRE INCREASE
ILEAGUE COUN CIL
Plan Urged By Brazil And China
Would Involve Immediate Addition
Of Three New Members
ILL RESULTS FORESEEN

ANTI-GOVERNMENT FORCES TAKE
CASTLE, PREMIER'S IIOME,
FOREIGN OFFICE
OFFICIALS RESIGN
Governnient Takes Measures To 1)-
hold The Conistit ition And IMaintahaii
Law And Order
(By Associated Press)
WARSAW, Poland, May 12._-
The government announced in a
communication this afternoon that
it was in control of the situatlon
caused by a military mutiny.
PARIS, May 12.-'I ie Ilavlas
correspondent in Warsaw says
the semi-official Polish telegraph
agency today issued a coninuni
que confirming that several de-
tachinments of troops have Inuti-
Wed.
BERLIN, May 12.-Reliable advices
from Warsaw say that severe fighting
occurred in the streets of the Polish
capital this afternoon, many persons
being killed or wounded.
Anti-government forces are reported
to have occupied the castle, the pre-
mier's residence and the foreign of-+
fice, and to be marching on the pres-
ident's palace at Belvidere.
It is additionally reported that the
government has resigned and that the
president's resignation is expected.
Cominuauicalion Crippled
Telegraph and telephone communi-,
cation from Warsaw is badly inter-
rupted, but the Polish agency at Dan-
zig sends out the information that
troops loyal to the government have
occupied all the public buildings.-
NEW YORK, May 12.-The mutiny+
among Polish troops is confined to the'
detachments stationed at Rembertow,
according to an official dispatch today
from Warsaw to the Polish consulate
general here. The government has
taken "all necessary measures to pro-
tect the constitution and to maintain
law and order," the massage said.
The dispatch, filed in Warsaw late
today, follows:
"Propaganda hostile to police, which
has been active for some time has re-
sulted in bringing about some regret-
able manifestations of breach of dis-
cipline among a detachment of troops
stationed at Rembertow, near War-
saw.

Entertainment
To Be Donated
For Cap Night
As a feature of the traditional Cap
night ceremonies which will be held
tomorrow night at Sleepy Hollow, the
local Butterfield theaters will present
a free motion picture performance and
vaudeville act in Hill auditorium im-
mediately following the scheduled ex-
ercises.
It was the preference of the But-
terfield organization to hold the show
in the Majestic and Arcade theaters,
but, inasmuch as their combined seat-
ing capacities total only 3,500 in con-
parison to 5,500 for Hill auditorium, it
was decided to give the entertainment
in the latter place. In this way, all
students present will be able to see1
the vaudeville act which could other-
wise be seen only by those at thea
Majestic theater.
No announcement has been made in f
regard to the name of the picture, ex-1
cept that it will not be any of those1
which are now being shown at the
local theaters, and will be presented
in Ann Arbor only at this special per-
formance.
English Debate
At Live rpoo01

KUENZEL WINS SECRETARYSIIW
BY 121 VOTES IN FOUR.-
CORNERED RACE
LIKERT HEADS S. C. A.
Lester Johnson, '27, won the Union
presidential race yesterday, defeating
Daniel Warner, '27, the only other
candidate by the overwhelming ma-
jority of 692 votes. Johnson received
a total of 1437 ballots as compared
to 745 for Warner.
Walter Kuenzel, '27E, was elected
recording secretary of the Union in a
four-cornered contest, defeating his
nearest opponent, Howell Russ, '27,
by 131 votes. Kuenzel polled 678
votes against 547 for Russ, 441 for
Paul Starrett, '27A, and 295 for Robert
Price, '27.
For the vice-presidency of tire Union
representing the literary college,
Elliott Chamberlain, '27, had little dif-
ficulty in winning over Gordon Van
Loan, '27, receiving 673 votes as com-
pared to 210 for Van Loan.
George Stanley, '27E, was elected
vice-president of the Union repre-
senting the engineering college, poll-
ing 209 votes against 170 for Law-
rence Buell, Jr., '27E.
The Union vice-presidential contest
in the Law school was exceedingly
close, John Bennett, 127L, winning by
the narrow margin of six ballots.
Bennett polled 138, Elmer Salzman,
'27L, 132, and Francis O'Brien, '27L,
1 43.
George Likert, '27, was elected
president of the Student Christian as-
sociation by 151 votes over his near-
est opponent, ArnoldvAndersen, '28.
Likert received 069 votes, Andersen,
518, Merriam Herrick, '27E, 329, and,
Albert Flindt, '27 120. Andersen, as
the runner-up for the presidential
office, is automatically given the vice-
presidency of the Student Christian
association.
In the Oratorical association elec-
tion, J. B. Mikesell, '27L, easily won
the presidency over Emanuel Harris,
spec., by a majority of 467. Mikesell
polled 1231 votes against 764 for
Harris.

AS

(By
LIVERPOOL,
The University

Cablegram)
England, May 12.--
of Michigan English

UNION EXECUTIVE

(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, May 12.-Brazil

and

China caused consternation in theI
secret sessions of the commission
studying reconstruction of the League
of Nations council today by urging
that the number of permanent mem-
bers of the council be increased to 10.
As the tendency of the commission's
majority has been for no increase in
the number of permanent members,
today's development is regarded as
seeking ill for obtainment of una-
nimity in the report which the com-
mission will make to the council.
With Germany's entrance, the coun-,
cil will have five permanent members,
while two places always are to be
held in reserve for the United States
and Russia. The recommendation of
Brazil and China would mean an im
mediate augmentation of three new
perpetual members.
The commission's deliberations have
been marked to date by the exercise
of courteous but firm diplomatic pres-
sure on Brazil and Spain, the two
main aspirants for seats: This has
been done by provisional adoption of,
the Cecil project, providing that non]
permanent or elected members will
take office as soon as they are elected.
Under this arrangement, if Brazil and
Spain are not re-elected in September,
they can no longer prevent the en-
trance of Germany by threatening a
vote.
Having suggested this possibility of
non reelection to Brazil and Spain,
the representatives of the great pow-
ers sought to satisfy the former's am-
bitions by indicating indirectly they
should virtually become permanent'
members by being reelected for all
time.
Future assemblies, however, must
decide whether special states can be
reelected for virtually an unlimited
period and it is admittedly doubtful
whether Brazil or Spain would be;
contented with such an arrangement.
Brazil shows she was not satisfied
whel the commission to permit freer!
discussions went into secret session
to debate the problems of to what'
extent the council should be enlarged,
if at all. It was then that Brazil and
China demanded an increase in the
number of permanent seats to ten.
[OurWeatherN4,h

debating team arrived here today from
Quebec on the Doric, sister ship of
the S. S. Regina.
The Michigan team was scheduled
to arrive in England May 10, and the
itinerary called for a debate with Liv-
erpool university for that date. Prof.
Thomas C. Trueblood, of the public
speaking department, said last night
that no doubt there would be changes
in the itinerary to make possible the
first debate with Liverpool. Oxford
is on the itinerary for this week, and
Cambridge for next week.
William W. King, Jr., '27L, E. R.
Gomberg, '27, and Gerald E. White,
'27, make up the Michigan team. Prof.
It. D. T. Hollister, of the public speak-
ing department, is accompanying the
team as coach and manager.
After Oxford and Cambridge areI
met in debate, Bristol, Leeds, Man-
chester, Sheffield, and Exeter in Eng-1
land, and St. Andrews in Scotland will
be debated.
ROALO91 AMUNDSEN FLIES r
ACROSS POLE IN NORGE,

Orders Were Fo
"To obtain such a r
lrders have been delibe
by unprincipled conspi
Polish government has ur
necessary measures to
constitution and to main
order throughout the cou
"The president of the
the supreme chief of thee
pealed to those guiltyp
nation, as well as to allc
ing them to maintain the1
INITIATES 12 AT

rged (3y Associated Press)
esult, forged NEW YORK, May 12.--The New
rately issued York Times and the St. Louis Globe-
rators. The Democrat announced at 10 o'clock to-
ndertaken all I night that no dispatches had been re-
protect the ceived from Roald Amunden's airship
tain law and Norge since the message sent at .3:30
ntry. o'clock this morning, Norwegian time,
republic as 9:30 eastern standard time, that thel
army has ap- airship had crossed the North Pole.
of insubordi- It was estimated that the Norge
citizens, urg- would reach Alaska in about 25 hours
law." if she maintained the speed made on
-- the flight from King's Bay to the pole.a
[llflr(!The next news of the explorers wasj
expected to come from Alaska.
Seior Sing Held
I O4. L1 S7 TW 4y a.' is.e-

i
Entire German
Cabinet .Falls;
.Flag Is Issue1
(Bly Associated Press)
I
3ERIIN, May 12.-Dr. Hans Lu-
ther, the German chancellor, suffered
a personal defeat in the Reichstag
today, when a motion of censure
moved by the Democrats, was adopted
by a vote of 176-146. One hundred
and three deputies abstained from
voting.
The chancellor's downfall was ac-
complished through the adoption of a
Democratic resolution of condemna-
tion because of his attitude on the,
government's flag decree-that the ,
merchant flag composed of the old
(monarchist colors should be flown
side by side with the republican flag'
on new German embassies and con-
sulates abroad.
Dr. Luther's defeat carried with it
the fall of the entire cabinet, which
shortly after the Reichstag anotinced
that it had decided to retire in a
body, in keeping with its previous de-
termination to share the blame of the
flag action with the chancellor.
President von Hindenberg accepted
the resignation of the ministry andl
requested Dr. Luther to carry on un-
til a new government can be formed.
The chancellor's overthrow really
was accomplished through a combina-
tion of the Democratic, Socialist and
Communist's votes-an alliance which,
Reichstag leaders assert eliminates
the Democrats from immediate par-
ticipation in the new government.
Dr. Luther, who is the first of al-
most a score of post-war chancellors
to receive such a personal censure by
parliament feels his position keenly
and has requested President von Hin-
denberg to relieve him of further du-
ties as chancellor at the earliest pos-
sible date. The German people's
1party and Centrists are expected to
form a minority bourgeois cabinet
without the Democrats.
Dr. Luther's friends hhme the Ger- ,

Election Returns
STUDENT COUNCIL
President
Thomas H. Cavanaugh......881
W. Calvin Patterson........631
Thomas V. Koykka........548
Senior Representatives
Theodore Hornberger ......1235
Frederick S. Glover........912
Russell Baker.............853
Kenneth Michel ............ 847
James F. Boyer ............ 665
H. R. Stevenson............610
Lawrence Buell, Jr.......... 602
Junior Representatives
Henry S. Grinnell.........1534
Robert C. Leland...........1032
John F. Cleary.............936
John T. Snodgrass.......... 800
Matthew J. Hudson..........690
Carlton G. Champe .......... 596
MICHIGAN UNION
President
Lester Johnson ............1437
Daniel S. Warner...........745
Literary Vice-President
Elliott Chamberlain......... 673
Gordon Van Loan........... 210
Engineering Vice-President
George M. Stanley...........209
Lawrence'Buell, Jr...........170
Law Vice-President
John M. Bennett...........138
Elmer Salzman ...:........132
Francis T. O'Brien ..........43
Medical Vice-President
Robert M. Wilkins..........82
Kenneth M. Davenport ......33
Combined ice-President
Rudolph E. Larsen..........206
Lee C. Fowle ............... 42
Recording Secretary
Walter A. Kuenze........678
Howell Russ..............547
Paul Starrett ................ 441
Robert F. Price..............245
STUDENT 'CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA-
TION
President
George H. Likert .......... 669
Arnold G. Andersen.........518
Meriam C. Herrick...........329
Albert 0. Flindt...........120
(Anderson, finishing second, will
serve as vice-president
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
President
J. B. Mikesell............1231
Emanuel J. Harris .......... 764
Vice-Presidentl
James T. Herald ...........1063
L. E. Eserman ............. 797
Secretary
Margarette I. Nickols....... 907
Florence Pollock...........832
Treasurer
Robert E. Minnick.........1125
Frederick Schumann.........667
BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT
PURLICATIONS
(Three Elected)
W. Calvin Patterson .........1126
Fred Glover.............1054
Thomas V. Koykka .........993
Forrest Hea1h .:..:..........801
Tyler Watson................739
Charles Lee ................ 515
Sylvan Rosenbaum......... 401
F. F. Wilmot..............347
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
ATHLETICS
Senior Representative
(One Elected)
George M. Stanley ..........1016
James F. Boyer..............995
Junior Representative
(One Elected)
Henry S. Grinnell ..........1401
Norman Gabel .............. 696
LITERARY COLLEGE COUNCIL
Senior Representatives
(Three Elected)
Robert F. Price............575
Tyler Watson.... ...........564
William A. Warrick, Jr......525
Clayton B. Briggs...... 448
Robert Y. Keegan ........... 427
James W. Day ..............354
Junior Representatives
(Two Elected)
George H. Annable, Jr.......442

Jack P. Hedrick...........434
Gordon W. Packer .......... 403
Paul W. Endriss ............ 344
James Hughey, Jr.......... 257
Sophomore Representative
(One Eleted)

Albert 0. Flindt..........
Junior Representatives
(Two Elected)
Charles Wells.............
Lawerence Van Tuyl........7
Wayne G. Cowell ...........I
James G. McKillen, Jr.....7
Sophomore Representative

202
154
148
142

11ORNBERGER, GLOVER, BAKER,
ELECTED TO OFFICE AS
SENIOR COUNCILMEN
2,374 PARTICIPATE
Thomas Cavanaugh, '27L, was chos-
en president of the Student council
in the annual Spring elections held
yesterday, scoring a substantial ma-
jority of 250 votes over Calvin Pat-m
terson,. '27, his nearest opponent.
Thomas Koykka, '27, the third candi-
date was 333 votes behind Cavanaugh
and 83 in the rear of Patterson.
Theodore Tornberger, '27, Fred
Glover, '27, and Russel Baker, '27E,
were elected senior representatives of
'the Student council for next year.
Hornberger received the heaviest vote
with 1235, Glover running second with
912, and Baker nosing out Michel, '27E,
with 853 against the latter's 847.
James Boyer, '27, H. R. Stevenson,
'27E, and Lawrence Buell; '27E, finish-
ed in the order named.
The three junior council representa-
tives are Henry Grinnell, '28, Robert
Leland, '28, and John Cleary, '28D.
Grinnell led the field with 1534 votes,
while Leland was second with 1032,
and Cleary third with 936. John
Snodgrass, '28E, Mathew Hudson, '28,
and Carlton Champe, '28, finished in
the order named.
Calvin Patterson, Fred Glover, and
Thomas Koykka were elected f'rom a
field of eight to serve on the Board in
Control of Student Publications for
next year.
As senior representative oh the
Board in Control of Athletics, George
Stanley, '27E, defeated James Boyer,
'27. Henry Grinnell- won the junior
representative election over Nornian
Gabel.
A total of 2,374 students voted in
yesterday's election which is slightly
below the number a year ago. The
total of three days' registration was
4,121. The women's vote yesterday
was noticeably weak, only 132 casting
ballots.
Modification Wins
In Campus Vote
Results of the campus vote on the
prohibition question shows that 51
per cent of the votes cast were in
favor of modification of the 18th
amendment, 32 per cent in favor of en-
forcement of the amendment and 17
per cent favored repeal of the amend-
ment. The actual count was as fol-
lows: Repeal, 285; Modification, 866;,
and Enforcement, 533.

70

(One Elected)
John R. Gilmartin.........134
Walter C. Chaffee, Jr........112
Donald S. $mith .. .....95

LAW SCHOOL COUNCIL
Senior Representatives
(Three Elected)
Ray Alexander............
James B. Boyle............
Fred F. Eichhorn...........
John W. Conlin...........
Frederick H. Pinney.......
John Barrett ...............
Junior Representatives
(Two Elected)
George S. Haggerty........
Charles S. White.........
Paul W. Bruske..........
Richard L. Laurence.......

207
185
131
129
110
95
152
146
142
127

f

Following a tour of the campus by
' the initiates in board stocks, Barrist-
ers, honorary senior legal society of
the Law school, held its annual initia-
tion banquet last night at the Law-1
yers' club.
Alumni, members, initiates, and the
faculty of the Law school were pres-
ent. The banquet was addressed by
Dean Henry M. Bates. The following
men of the present junior law class
were initiated into the society: R. L.
Alexander, J. J. Weadock, R. D. Doten,
J. D. Wolfe, Trent McMath, R. W.

vri c~a -c~ y
Starting a complete repertoire of
campus songs which will be completed
next week with the second Senior
sing, members of the classes of '26
met last night on the Library steps
and took part in the first mass sing-.
ing in connection with the Varsity
band concert. Popular numbers and
also a few classical selections fol-
lowed; the evening was completed!
with the "Yellow and Blue", and faint
"Good night, Ladies" was heard as the
seniors dispersed from the steps.

DENTAL COLLEGE COUNCIL
Senior Representatives
(Three Elected)
George E. Meads..... :......19
Howard M. Mapes........... 16
Robert I. Bealby............13
Rudolph E. Larson ......... 10
Stuart H. Ward ........... 8
Harris L. Wilson ........ ..6
Juulor Representatives
(Two Elected)
Glen G. MacGilhivary......... 18
Everett W. Gulden .......... 11
John T r(v..n 10

5
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0
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