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May 12, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-12

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ESTABLISHED
1890

46F
111,0001W
150-OW
AN m
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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 165

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

4 . .

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PREIDENT HONORS
BRTON'S MEMORY
IN SWIN6-UUT TALK
SENIORS STAND UNCOVERED OUT
OF RESPECT FOR LATE
LEAERr
BAND LEADS MARCH
Classes Of '26 Appear For First Time
In Caps And Gowns To Attend
Traditional Gathering
Requesting the members of the
classes of '26 to rise and stand uncov-
Bred for a moment as a respect to the I
memory of the man who was the head
of the University during the major
part of their careers here, Marion Le-
Roy Burton, President Clarence Cook
Little lauded his predecessor in the
opening remarks of his address at the
Swing-out ceremonies yesterday after-
noon in Hill auditorium.
"The triumph of your social obliga-
tion over self is the highest achieve-
ment you can ever expect to accom-
plish," President Little went on to tell
the seniors. "What is it you have in
common, what is it that unites you in
life?" he questioned, "it is, that in the
present generation, educated men and
women are on the edge of a social
point ofrview-selfish, individual view-
points are for the past.
"Insofar as you have lived a part of
this University, you can never leave
It; you can never leave Michigan,"
President Little continued. "Now is
the lowest ebb of your feeling to your
alma mater; the spirit will begin to
rise as soon as you leave here, and
continue from then on.
"You have in you. power of infinite'
good," the President told the seniors.
"If there is one thing that I would like
to leave with this afternoon, it is
this: so live during the next month
so think, and so consecrate yourselves
to this University, that you might be
a living exponent of what you want
for the classes to come"
Long, flowing gowns,-dark tassels,
bright tassels, yellow, red, orange, and
blue tassels,-and colored, graceful
hoods, all formed a part of the wind-
ing procession that filed into the side
entrance of Hill auditorium yesterday
from the Library. The Varsity >and
played from the beginning of the
march at thehLibrary until the last
group had entered the auditorium.
Harry G. Messer, president of the
class, who presided at the ceremonies,
led the two-columned procession with F
Kenneth C. Kellar, president of the
Student council.
Rev. Henry Lewis, rector of, St.
Andrews' Episcopal church, delivered
the invocation at the assembly. The
organ selections were played by Philip
E. La Rowe, SofM. Singing of "The
Yellow and Blue" preceded the reces-
sional, after which the seniors march-
ed out of the main entrance across the
campus, and finally ended up on the
steps of the Library where pictures
of the classes were taken.
This was the first official appearance
of the seniors in their caps and gowns.
The garb will be worn today and each
Wednesday following until Commence-
ment on June 14.
Fresh Air Fund
Tag Sale Raises
$450 On Campusl
Contributions totalling more than
$450 were made yesterday to the Fresh
Air camp fund by students and towns-
people who bought tags on the cam-
pus. This figure is not quite as high
as that of last year, but it is expected
that the contribution of the organiza-
tions, which is not included in the
above figure, will be larger than last

year due to the new method of solicit-
ing them.
All houses are requested to send in
their donations to the chairman of the
Fresh Air camp drive as soon as pos-I
sible so that an accurate reckoning
can be made. The combined dona-
tions of organizations and indepen-
dents last year amounted to more than
$1,200 -and the committee expects that
This year's total will exceed that.
Members of Kappa Phi will present
a play, "The Valiant" by Halworthy
Hall at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Wesley hall. The cast includes Mar-
garet Feair, '27, Earl Sawyer, '27,
George Douglass, ,'26, and Donald
Timerman, '26. A moving picture of
Aesops fables will also be shown,
after which the audience will descend
to the "Bohemian Restaurant" in the
basement for refreshments.

Committees Report In Second
Meeting Of Fraternity Alumni

Reports on fraternity scholarship,
deferred rushing and pledging, the
liquor problem, and permanent or-j
ganization occupied the second meet-
ting of the fraternity alumni of the
University, which was held last night
at the Union.
The committee on prohibition en-
forcement, of which M. Hewitt
O'Brien, '98, was chairman, reported
that in the opinion of the committee
the responsibility of enforcement of
the prohibition law rests primarilyl
with the national and local officers.
The report suggested that the threat,
of padlocking a fraternity which rep-!
resented a considerable investment on
the part of the alumni might be suf-
ficient to force the alumni body tof
demand more strict observance of the
rules. "The methods to be used should
be persuasive, rather than compul-
sive," the report stated. A motion to
accept the report and place it on file
was carried.
Delos Smith, '17, gave the report of

F I

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the committee on scholarship, oi
which he was chairman. The report
proposed that social honors be given
only to fraternities on the upper 25
per cent of the fraternity scholarship
rating and that elective honors be
given only to members of these fra-
ternities. It also provided that ap-
pointments from fraternity men must
go to those in the upper half of their
respective fraternities in regard to
scholarship. The motion that the
sense of the meeting was to approve
the report was carried.j
The committee on deferred pledging
suggested that the Inter-fraternity
council reconsider the question of de-
ferred pledging, since the committee!
had found that such plans have suc-
ceeded in other universities.
Mr. O'Brien then gave the report of
the work of the committee on perma-i
nentworganization and it was decided
to notify the various fraternity alumni
associations of the proposed consti-
tution and ask them to accept by mail.

fidial

Ballo

ALL CAMPUS ELECTION, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12

INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a cross in the square ([ ])l
the name of the candidate for whom you wish to vote.

b

efore

Michigan Union
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT

Students' Christian
Association
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

CHIEF SPEAKERAT
FATHERS'_BANQUE1T
ARRANGEMENTS ARE NEARLY
COMPLETE, CHAIRMAN
ANNOUNCES
PREPARE FOR 500
Cap Night, Tours Of Campus, Football,
And Convocation Also On
Week-End Program
"What a Father Expects His Son to
Accomplish at Michigan" is the topic
that has been selected by Former Con-
gressman O. J. Larson, '94L, of Du-
luth, Minn., for the principal address
at the fourth annual Fathers' Day
banquet Saturday night at the Union.
Since his two terms in the house of
representatives, Mr. Larson has been
practicing law in Duluth where lie is
one of the most prominent attorneys
and speakers in the state of Minnesota.
He will arrive in Ann Arbor Friday
for the week-end program and will be
the guest of his son, Robert Larson,
'27, while here.I
Arrangements for the banquet are
practically complete it was stated yes-
terday by Paul Starrett, '27A, chair-
man of the Union Fathers' Day com-
mittee. Dean Henry M. Bates of the
Law school, who has been actively
identified with the Union since itst
initiation in 1904, and who directed
the financial campaign a few years
ago which made possible the erection
of the present building, will be the
toastmaster. Dean Edmund E. Day of
the School of Business Administra-
tion will be the faculty speaker. His
topic has not yet been announced.
William L. Diener, '26, president of
the Union, will be the final speaker on
the program as representative of the
student body.
The banquet will begin promptly at
5:30 o'clock Saturday night. An or-
chestra will play during the meal,
and entertainment will be provided
during the speakers' program by a
quartet of the Clea club and a student
ventrilo'quist. The Union is making
preparations to serve nearly 500.
Most of the fathers are expected
to arrive Friday in time for the Cap
night ceremonies in Sleepy Hollow
that evening. Tours of the campus
will be made Saturday morning and
the football scrimmage at Ferry field
attended in the afternoon. The ban-
quct Saturday night will not be of
long duration, in order that the fath-
ers may spend most of the evening
with their sons as they choose. Many
of the fathers plan to attend the con-
vocation at Hill ,auditorium Sunday
morning where Dr. Albert Parker
Iitch of Carleton college will give the
address.
Chairmen of fraternity Fathers' Day
committees and others are urged by
the Union committee to procure tick-
ets for the banquet at the main desk
of the Union immediately as the ac-
commodations in the assembly hall
are limited. The ticket sale reached
300 late yesterday.-
Meetings Hint.
British Strike
May End Soon
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 12.-Prolonged secret
discussions at Trades Union head-
quarters which lasted until an early
houT this (Wednesday) morning si-
multaneously with a special cabinet
meeting held in the House of Com-
mons which was followed by further

ministerial conversations in Downing
street were taken as indicating that
an important peace move was afoot.
Consequently there is strong hope in
some quarters that the strike may be
Fcalled off before long.
While it is impossible to obtain any
authoritative statement on what pass-
ed at Union headquarters, it is evi-
dent the matters under discussion
were of great consequence.
If there were no other grounds for
this deduction, the fact that the pre-

German Flag
Issue Causes
Party Friction
(By Associated Press)
BERLIN, May 12.-The Parliamen-
tary situation reached a critical stage
by reason of a midnight caucus by
the Democrats who adopted a resolu-
tion that further cooperation With

Chancellor Luther was impossible be-PQ
cause of his procedure in the flag PROHIBITION QUESTION; BINGLE
issue. iBOOTH TO CLOSE AT 4:15
BERLIN, May 11.-The battle for Officers and representatives of campus organizations and two control
and against the colors of the Germanborsfrnx
republic, which were adopted by the boards for next year will be determined today when more than 4,000 stu-
National Assembly at Weimar in 1919,1dents of the University, who have registered for the purpose,- cast their
opened along a. broad parliamentary ballots in the annual spring elections. The Student Christian association
front today when Chancellor Luther has also arranged for a campus vote on the prohibition question today, as
told the Reichstag that the govern- a part of the nation-wide movement which is being made in universities and
ment's recent two flag decree was in I colleges to determine the attitude of students regarding the Eighteenth
force and would remain in force. Amendment. All students, whether they have registered or not, owill be
As a concession to the Democratic entitled to vote on the prohibition ballot.
opposition, the cabinet earlier in the eh
day had voted to suspend the ordi- 'Voting this year will be confined to one booth for all students of the
nance until August 1 when it hopes a University which will be located in the middle of the diagonal opposite the
new national banner will be adopted. library. Several tables will be erected for the purpose. The polls will be
This failed to appease the Democrats open from 9 until 4:15 o'clock.
as they demand permanent suspen- On the official ballot today will appear the names of the candidates who
sions of the government's decree call- are running for offices of the Union, the Student council, the Students'
ing for the joint hoisting on German Christian association, the Oratorical association, and membership on the
embassies and consulates abroad of Board in Control of Student Publications and the Board in Control of Athletics.
the federal banner and the merchant's Wmnwl oeo.sprt alt
flag Women will vote on separate ballots
fla. socalst dean uconitonl for candidates of the Oratorical as-
The socialists demand unconditionalIIflIU A IH I.IV sociation and the publications and
retention of the present republican sUUiatioard then and
colors and Luther's retirement as a H 9 T 0 H HT athletic boards. Bath men and women
decrees willalso1b privieged t
penalty for countersigning the flag1 castdtheir votessfor representatives of
IILL one college council, that being the col-
lege which the student attends. Elec-
- tions will take place in the newly
FRATE NITIE SHOW Sir Arthur Neiisoline Will Denvher created councils of the literary,; en-
Additional Lectures Tomorrow gineering, Law and dental schools,
the candidates for each being listed on
SAnd Fridayseparate colored ballots. The election
in the college council of the Medical
WELL KNOWN AUTHOR school will not take place until next
-- .fall when it will be confined to stu-
Comparison Of Scholarship Standing dents of that school.
For Last Two Years Reveals geregarded as one of the most noted In order to vote today a student
authorities on public health, will will be obliged to fill in a blank at
PHI KAPPA SIGMA LEADS speak at 4:15 o'clock today in Natural the bottom of the main ballot with his

BALTIGIN ANNUAL SPRING
ELECTIONS TODAY WILL SELE-CT~
NEXT YEA'SCAMPUS OFFICERS
S.C. A. ARRANGES FOR STUDENT VOTE ON

(Vote for One)

[
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DANIEL S. WARNER
LESTER JOHNSON
RECORDING SECRETARY
(Vote for One)
WALTER A. KUENZEL
HOWELL RUSS
PAUL STARRETT
ROBERT F. PRICE

[
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GEORGE H. LIKERT
ARNOLD G. ANDERSEN
MERIAM C. HERRICK
ALBERT O. FLINDT

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Those who vote express themselves
as being in favor with the objectives
of the Student Christian Association.

LITERARY VCE PRES.
(Vote Only for One and Only
In Your Dept.)

[
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ELLIOTT CHAMBERLAIN
GORDON VAN LOAN

Oratorical.
Association
(Enutire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
EMANUEL J. HARRIS
J. B. MIKESELL
VICE PRESIDENT
JAMES T. HERALD
L. E. EISERMAN

ENGINEERING VICE PRES.

[
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LAWRENCE BUELL, JR.
GEORGE M. STANLEY
LAW VICE PRES.
JOHN M. BENNETT
ELMER H. SALZMAN
FRANCIS T. O'BRIEN
MEDIC VICE PRES.
ROBERT W. WILKINS
KENNETH M. DAVENPORT
COMBINED VICE PRES.
RUDOLPH E. LARSON
LEE C. FOWLE

[
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Comparative scholastic standings of.
the general fraternities on the campus,
for the first semester of the current
school year, as announced yesterday
from the office of the dean of students,1
shows a distinct improvement over the
standings on the chart issued last fall
to cover the two semesters of 1924-25.
Phi Kappa Sigma holds the first po-
sition with an average of 79.3, as
against a leading average of 77.2 held
last year by Kappa Nu. There are ten
fraternities with an average of better
than 76 forlast semester, as com-
pared to five with this standing on
the previous record. The system used
in compiling th'e results is the same
as has been used in other years, 85.00
being accEpted as a straight "B"
grade. The first ten fraternities with
their averages follow:
Phi Kappa Sigma, 79.3; Sigma Phi
Epsilon, 78.1; Pi Kappa Alpha, 78.06;
Chi Psi, 77.4; Tau Kappa Epsilon,
77.1; Delta Tau Delta, 77.1; Delta Tau
F Upsilon, 76.9; Phi Sigma Delta, 76.6;
Phi Sigma Kappa, 76.2; and Pi Lamb-
da Psi, 76.04.
The other fraternities followed in
the order named: Theta Chi, Kappa
Delta Rho, Zeta Beta Tau, Trigon,
I Delta Phi, Delta Alpha Epsilon, Phi
Epsilon Pi, Kappa Nu, Lambda Chi
Alpha, Phi Mu Alpha, Sigma Phi, Al-4
lpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Lambda.
E Beta Theta Pi, Kappa Sigma, Theta
Delta Chi, Delta Sigma Phi, Phi Kap-
pa Psi, Sigma Nu, Delta Upsilon, Al-
pha Chi Rho, Acacia, Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kap-
pa Tau, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Mu
Delta, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Tau Epsilon
Phi, Gamma Sigma, Alpha Sigma Phi,
Sigma Pi, Phi Kappa, Phi Beta Delta,
Zeta Psi, Hermitage, Alpha Tau
Omega, and Sigma Chi. The following1
fraternities had an average below
70: Sigma Alpha Mu, Omega Psi Phi,
Tau Delta Phi, Psi Upsilon, Phi Del-;
ta Theta, Theta Kappa Nu and Al-
pha Delta Phi.
All three of the leaders of last year
have dropped considerably, Kappa Nu
the former top house now holding
22nd place, while Delta Alpha Epsi-
lon and Zeta Beta Tau who held sec-1
ond and third on the former rating
are now in the 16th and 13th posi-
tions respectively.

Science auditorium. He will also lec-
ture at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow and
Friday. While the order of his speech-
es are not known the subjects have,
been announced as "The Limitations
of Liberty as Related to Communal
Life," "The Growth of Social Insur-
ance in Britain," and "The History of
tire Growth of the Preventitive Idea
in Medicine."1
Sir Arthur gained recognition as
head of the Great Britain health ser-
vice for many years. He is an au-
thority on national health insurance
and it is through his work in this
field that he won reputation.
He is the author of a large number
of books on public health subjects, the
latest of which is "The Ministry of
Health in Great Britain."' He has al-
so written a great many articles of
this nature appearing in English and
American medical journals.
Sir Arthur obtained his medical de-
I gree from the medical school at Uni-
versity college, London, in 1880. lHe
has been a lecturer on public health
topics at both Oxford and Cambridge
universities.-He was made a fellow of
the royal college in 1898.
Seniors To Wear
Caps And Gowns
to Classes Today
Appearing on the campus for the
first of the weekly appearances on
Wednesday, seniors of all schools and
colleges will wear their caps and
gowns today and gather at 7:15 o'clock.
tonight on the steps of the Library,
for the first Senior Swing in connec-
tion with the band concert.
I WILL CLOSE 'ENSIAN
DISTRIBUTION TODAY
Today will be the last day on '
J which 'Ensians will be given out
upon receipts. All books not
called for by 5 o'clock will be
subject to distribution to those
on the 'waiting list'.
j W. F. GRAHAM,j
SI Business Manager,
Michiganensian.

or her name, class, departmQnt, ad-
dress, and hours of credit. This stub
will then be torn off and handed in
with the ballot to provide a check on
the total number of all votes cast.
Members of the Student council not
candidates for office, and a number of
prominent seniors will begin counting
the ballots at the Union as soon as the
polls close in the afternoon.
The prohibtion vote will be made on
separate ballots. Students may an-
swer one of threeaquestions thereon.
The ballot reads as follows:
"Do you favor:
"1. The repeal of the Eighteenth
Amendment?
"2. The Modification of the Vol-
stead Act to permit the sale of light
wines and beer?
"3. The Prohibition Amendment as
it stands?"
Three further changes appear in the
official ballot today which were made
since its publication in The Daily last
Sunday. The name of Robert DeVore,
'27, and Gordon Culverwell,)'29E, were
withdrawn from the list of senior and
junior representatives respectively
owing to ineligibility, and that of Wil-
liam Mullin, '27, was withdrawn from
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications following his appointment as
business manager of Chimes for next
year.
The college council ballots today
will list' the following candidates:
Literary school-(senior representa-
tives) Robert Keegan, Tyler Watson,
Clayton Briggs, William Warrik, jr.,
I James Day, Robert Price; (junior)
Jack Hedrick, George Annable, jr.,
Paul Endriss, James Hughey, jr., Gor-
don Packer; (sophomore) Harlan
Christy, John Knight, Paul Kern.
Engineering school-(senior repre-
sentatives) John Lovette, George
Stanley, Thomas Cranage, Albert
Flindt, Paul Starrett, Clark Center,
Paul Arnold; (junior) James McKil-
len, jr., Charles Wells, Wayne Cowell,
Lawrence Van Tuyl; (sophomore)
John Gilmartin, Walter Chaffee, jr.,
Donald Smith.
Law school-(senior representa-
tives) Ray Alexander, James Boyle,
Fred Eichorn, John Conlin, John Bar-
rett, Frederick Pinney; (junior)
George Haggerty, Charles White, Paul
Bruske, Richard Lawrence; (sopho-
more) to be elected next fall.
Dental school-(senior representa-
tives) George Meads, Rudolph Larson,
Stuart Ward, Howard Mapes, Robert
0Sealby, and Harris Wilson; (junior)
John Galven, Everett Pierson, Glen
MacGillivary, Everett Gulden; (sopho-
more) D. C. Miller, Harlow Shehan,
Stewart Devries.

SECRETARY

[
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FLORENCE POLLOCK
MARGARETTE I. NICKOLS

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TREASURER

[

] ROBERT E. MINNICK
] F. SCHUMANN

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]

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

Board in Control of
Student Publications!

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THOMAS V. KOYKKA
CALVIN PATTERSON
THOMAS H. CAVANAUGH

1
]
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]
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]

(Entire Campus Vote)
(Vote for Three)
TYLER WATSON
CHARLES LEE
FORREST HEATH
F. F. WILMOT
SYLVAN ROSENBAUM
THOMAS KOYKKA
CALVIN PATTERSON
FRED GLOVER

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three).

[
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ii

RUSSELL C. BAKER-
LAWRENCE BUELL, JR.
H. R. STEVENSON
KENNETH A. MICHEL
JAMES F. BOYER
THEODORE R. HORNBERGER,
FREDERIC S. GLOVER, JR.

Board in Control
Athletics
(Entire Campus Vote)
SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE

mier and several other ministers as
well as prominent officers of the labor
department remained at the, prime
minister's residence until, after 1
o'clock in expectation of receiving a
communication from the labor lead-
ers would be sufficient to show the
importance of the discussions.
It became known soon afterward
that a trade union delegation prob-
ably would confer with the premier
and other ministers some time this j
morning after another meeting of the

Bill To Abolish Railroad
Trade Board Passes Senate

(By Associated Press>
WASHINGTON, May 11.-The Wat-
son-Parker bill to abolish the Railroad
Labor board and set up new machin-
ery for handling disputes between car-
riers and their employees was pass-
ed today by the Senate 69-13.1
The measure now goes to President

posing .to give the Interstate Com-
merce commission final authority over
wage awards. This was rejected
64-12.
A surprise was sprung by Senator
Norbeck, Republican, South Dakota
with an amendment proposing to re-
peal the rate-making section of the

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Our We atherllanI

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LAAIWUlj

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IIOJS:EWORTIL AP~POINTED

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