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May 09, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-09

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PAGE. FOUR

THEW MTC-IT( N fDAIL'Y

SUTNDAY MAY 9. 92

_..1 1"I

A7 V i T. .lF7. 1 iTiL i 1 !7 4 V

Published every morning except Monkay
during the University year by the Buas in
Control of Student Publications.

,{ '
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Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the usefor republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
*Entered at the postoffice at Ants Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
snaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $ .US; by mail,
4.00.
Offices: Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
hatd Street.
Photes. 4jtorl, a; bUinslas, O02.
~DTORIAL 5TAfl
Oelephene mUE
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board.... Norman R. Thal
News Editor..........Manning Housewortb
Women's Editor........... Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor........... oseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor .i am Walthour
Music and Drama....... Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykka W. Calvin Patterson
Auistant City Editors
Irwin Olian a Crederick I. Shillito
.Assistants

Gerirude ailey
Charles Behymer
Gear gleBe neike
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
'Earl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Carleton Champ.e
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
James T. Herald
ussell Hitt
Miles Kimball
Marion Kubik
Harriett Levy

Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehiouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
'Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

BUSTNESS STAFF
Telephone 1214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..... u......Rdolphb &ottelman
Advertising..............Wm. L. Mullin
Advertising........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation............. .James R. DePuy
Publication ..............rank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts...........,..........Paul W. Arnold
Assistants >
George H. Annable, Jr. Frank Mosher
W. Carl Bauer F. A. Norquist
John H. Bobrink Loleta G. Prkr
Stanley S. Coddington David Perrot
W, J. C' Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wi. C. Puch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderlad
T. Kenneth Iaves Win. J. Weinma
Harold Holmes Margaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson
SUNDAY, MAY 9, 1926
Night Editor-LEONARD C. HALL
THE UNIVESITY WELCOMES-
In th past, the University has play-
ed a willing and an important part
in the periodical entertainment of
high school delegations coming to
Ann Arbor, whether it be for ath-
letic meets, for journalistic coiyen-
tions, or for other forms of high school
competition. Tomorrow night, not
only the University, but every Ann
Arborite, is offered an opportunity to
play the equally, willing position of
host to the teams and representatives
here for the annual state high school
championship debate.
These students come to Ann Arbor
with something of an expectant ideal
of University life, eager to see and
become acquainted with all it may
have to offer them in the future. Un-
consciously, they are influenced by
the tenor of their reception while
here, and it remains an obligation to
welcome them cordially, and a privi-
lege to make their visit here a suc-
cess, for they represent the best in I
the state.
The debating activities of these
young people du'ring their season of
state debating league competition in-
clude a number of surprising ac-
complishments. With 1,000 pupils en-
gaged in considerably more than 500
debates, and these heard by a total
audience of 100,000, the extent of state
interests in high school debating be-
comes readily apparent.
Not so apparent, but there just the
same, is the sound value of this activ-
ity to the participating teams. The
two teams pitted againsteach other
tomorrow night have already been
successful in twelve league debates,
not taking into account numerous oth-
er , In these contests, they learn to'
thick clearly, accurately, and quickly,
in addition to gaining an intimate
knowledge of current world affairs.
If these two teams, sponsored by a
university organization state-wide in
scope, are acclaimed by the appreci-
ative presence of a gathering inter-'
ested hi hcarhing their efforts, they
can be made to feel that the Univer-
sity is genuinely interested in them
nud anxious to have them return. At c
any rate, they are our guests, and as
such are entitled to a welcome, not
by the few, but by a group represen-
tative of a great university.
THREE MILLION SLAVES

ing numerous difficulties, and are
gaining ground but slowly.
Reports from Bombay state that the:
Barnard expedition, sent out by the
Burma government, has liberated 3,-
445 slaves in the Hukawng valley.
Use of the telephone and gramaphone,
which to the natives were means of
communicating with the unseen world,
and remuneration for the masters,
were the only things which accomp-
lished these results without blood-
shed. Yet, in spite of these. inven-
tions and the moral and financial sup-
port behind these expeditions and
missionaries, we find 3,000,000 slaves
in the world today, according to an
estimate made by John H. Harris, ex-
missionary and traveler, speaking'for
the British Anti-slavery society. The.
League of Nations commission of in-
quiry has found slave trading car-
ried on in 19 political areas .of the
world.
It is hard to realize that at present
there are so many human beings in
subservience to others. Slavery un-
doubtedly will be eradicated to such a
point in time that there will not even
be a report on it made to the League
of Nations committee, if there be one
then. In the meantime, we in this
country can sit back comfortably and
be thankful that our forefathers
brought about its expulsion here..
FLAMING YOUTH
It is always the charge leveled at
the younger generation by the older,
that youth is headed straight for de-
struction and worse. Such is the fond
prediction of reformers and those
dedicated to the uplift of the human
race.
Following upon countless charges
of license and liberties taken by the
young of the land, thundered from the
pulpit and the lecture platform, from
the press and the publicist, comes a
refutation of these charges in the form
of a report based on extensive studies
the nation over by the Children's bu-
reau of the United States Department
of Labor.
New York, Gotham,-the city of a
thousand pitfalls,--shows, over the
period of the last ten years, a de-
crease from 11 to 6.8 cases of juve-
nile delinquency to every thousand of
the city's population. And Chicago!
That much maligned city, the alleged
resort of all sorts of horrid despera-
does, shows a similar record. Like'
wise, similar reports come from other
centers of population, Washington;
Boston, Buffalo, New Orleans, Rich-
mond, Providence,-scores of others.
Perhaps, after all, the "shik," and
the "flapper" too, do know how to
take care of themselves. Perhaps they
are not traveling the scarlet road as
rapidly as many claim;-perhaps not
even as rapidly as did the generation,
once removed, which now laments the
"license of youth."
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will e
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
A CORRECTION
To the Editor:
I should not care to have it thought
that I underrate the efforts of the
British Trades Unions to regulate a
decent day's work for the workman,
and therefore correct a detail printed
in my letter, two days ago:-the Brit-
ish working day is seven hours, and
not six as was stated. And the govern-
ment commission's alternative pro-
posal was therefore to raise the work-
ing day from seven hours to eight,
and not from six to seven as was
stated..
This is a correction in detail which

alters in no way the principle under-
lying these facts: that other ways
than reducing wages have been offer-
ed to the trades unions as at any rate
an experimental solution of the in-
dustrial difficulty.
I think I made myself sufficiently
clear in my letter and therefore will
not repeat myself..
-G. E. E.
(of S. Wales, England.)

IF

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OUrR
SWAN'SONG
Within a few days, now our suc-
cessor will be appointed (do we hear
mingledcheers and sobs?) and so it is
with great sadness that we write these
few last issues. We merely mention1
this in order that the reading public
might get the pathos of the clown
who must be funny though his heart
ix breaking (see "He Who Gets Slap-]
ped") and all that sort of thing.
The pathos of the new appointee is
also moving to the experienced ob-
server. Previous to and following his
appointment he does little else but
discuss the radical changes he willi
never bring about in all sincerity.
This paper has been functioning since
1890, during which time there have
been approximately 550 appointments
to various positions on the staff of
this paper, that is the editorial staff.
Nevertheless human nature is built
upon just such little illusions, and
who are we that we should adopt an
air of cynicism toward it all. First of
all we are among the 549. If this de-
partment were anything like we
thought it would be just about a year
ago, the Daily would have lost a
columnist to the New York Times or
the United States Daily long ago.
s * *s

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6

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Al 1D 7~i~

THE FOSH
It's a long worm that has no turn-
ing, Tiffin. For the lowly frosh have
at last turned on their oppressors
and just naturally ruined them. We
refer not to the games. We, you un-
derstand, like 'you, (being an upper-
classman) can take an unprejudiced
view of things.
But it's a bit thick, you know, when
the tables are turned. It's traditional
for the sophs to take the freshman out
and tan their hides and then cool 'em
off in the waters of the Huron. But
it seems to me that the frash this year
are getting just a little bit above
themselves. Going into rooming
houses, you know, and dragging out
poor defenseless sophs and paddling
them.
Last night after we had successfully
put out the Daily, two of us stood on
the corner speculating (as everybody
on the staff is doing) on this, that and
the other wighty matter of the uni-
verse. Just as we got to the most
interesting part of our conversation,
out of nowhere, it seemed, streaked a
lone member of the class of '28. We
judge that by this time he is' in New
York City; and when we saw him he
was going west.
Anyway, following him dashed half
a dozen fantastic creatures daubed
with green paint shouting, "Kill the
soph! To hell with '28!" And that's
the sort of freshman class we have
this year. When I was a freshman
there was a sort of vigilance commit-
tee (or so the upperclassmen said) to
make us behave. Can't this be re-
vived?
YIFNIF.
JUNE
(A tragedy in several seens)
The curtain rises to disclose a scene
on the Lehigh Valley. UR is a pile of
railroad ties. UC is a moon. UL is the
Iouse that Jack Built. RC are two
wanderers, sleeping. LC is the Great
God Brown, also asleep. Somewhere
a voice is calling-but not in this
theatre. Noe of these objects is visi-
ble, as a heavy darkness has settled
like a shawl over the landscape.
Presently the moon will rise. In the
meantime, enter Lord Whoofsnoogle
(pronounced Whoofsnoogle).
Lord Wh. (Walking slowly from left
to right, and looking about him) June!
Little Eva-June!
Little Lord Fauntleroy-Daddy!
Little Eva-Hot Daddy!
Lord Wh.-(Steadily) Yes, hot.
Lit. Lo. F.-Yes, hot! (As an after
thought,) Very hot!
Lady Astor-It has been so long, so
long. (Sadly) Why does not a sail ap-
pear?
Little Eva-(Passionately) Hot!
L. L. F.-Hot, hot, hot.
Little Eva-See, I have fifteen cents.
L. L. F.-I gotta a dime. Come on,
we can get in.
Lord Wh.-Get in where?
Ludy A.-Did you ever think about
it that way.
Lord Wh.-(Nodding) Yes, hot, very
hot.
Little Eva-June!
LLF--June?
Lady A.-June.
(Curtains-several of them.
The Deacon's Cousin
A JOKE
(Which was invented by ourselves
and appreciated by no one to whom it
was told. We now offer it to the pub-
GUEST: (Visiting the landlady)
Who was that that just knocked on
the door?

l

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA
TIllS AFTERNOON: The Special
Faculty Concert In H111 aditorumn
at 4:15 o'clock.
TOMORROW NIGHT: The Mimes
present Eugene O'Neill's "S. S. Glen.
cairn" in the Mimes theatre at 8:30
o'clock.
* 5 *
ABOLISH CHIMES!
A prominent dean in the University
recently returned from a fourteen
weeks' vacation. Consulted on a pro-
posed season of plays, he found it im-
possible to believe that the produc-
tions of the last semester had attract-
ed audiences for runs of four, six,
eight or ten capacity houses. For years
it had only been the grace of god and
good weather that could draw a
standing-room audience on a single
performance; "S. S. Glencairn," on
the contrary, was all but sold out for
its four scheduled performances be-
fore 'the first curtain rose . . . The
plays this year have been interesting
and original, clever and varied from
comedy and farce through the climax
which has been reached in the flavor
of "S. S. Glencairn." The season has
developed any number of actors, tal-
ent that has been found in the most
unexpected places; it has developed
artists in the settings for "Beggar-,
man" and "Engaged," a director !a
"Why Marry?", and in Mr. Shuter a
manager who can successively pro-
duce the classic comedy of Holberg,
the artificial satire of W. S. Gilbert,
and the robust power of O'Neill.
The last four days have shot the
temperature to a boulevard pitch, but
the houses have piled 'in. Tomorrow
evening it is going to rain, and the
fifth performance of "S. S. Glencairn"
will be sold out by six o'clock.
"SAINT JOAN"
Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan," star-
ring Julia Arthur, will return to the
Whitney theater for one performance
Friday night.
"Saint Joan" attempts to give a new
interpretation of the character of the
Maid, different from the depictions of
her by former writers. In previous
works Joan is idealized, almost deified;
Shaw portrays her as a living, vibrant,
flesh-and-blood girl, with a woman's
strength and a woman's frailties.
The play deals with Joan's demand
that she be allowed to try to raise the
siege of Orleans, her being forsaken
by her friends, her capture, trial and
execution. There is an epilogue, some
fifty years after the death of Joan,
telling of her canonization, and show-
ing that she would be equally perse-
cuted if she were to return to earth
today.
Shavian brilliance :s present in this
play as in all other works of the great
English dramatist. One scene is ex-
cellent in its historical analysis, a
conversation between the Bishop of
Beauvais and the Earl of Warwick,
foreshadowing the destruction of
feudalism and the Church's supre-
macy.
MIMES
There will be a business meeting of
Mimes for the election of new mem-
bers tomorrow afternoon in room 304
of the Michigan Union at four o'clock.
All members are requested to be
present. *.
MISS HARDING 1

g(.
jeL

HConsult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.
G R A H A M S BOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL.

SKILLED REPAIRINGNED
~get a Rider
Now
You will want one for your finals.
No uncertainty about a Masterpen. It writes at touch-holds
six to twelve times as much ink, and will outwear several pens
of other makes.

AUTO PARTS
For All Makes of Cars.
TIRES FOR SALE.
JUMK CARS BOUGHT
PHONE 3035.
KESSLER BROS., Canal Street j
MANN'SC01_ E CMl
For Your Inspection-
A wonderful line of Yeddo Straws
and Panamas at prices that are
RIGHT.
Panamas and, Straws
Cleaned and Blocked with
all new trimmings.
(No Acids Used)
HIGH CLASS WORK ONLY
FACTORY HAT STOREI
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.

Make Mother's
Enjoyment Complete
She will enjoy a light lunch,
or an Ice Cream Sundae at
* etsy R-oss Sh op
The popular Sunday evening refreshment parlor.
Betsy Ross Shop

*

ider s PenShop
124 HOUR, SERVICE-

NICKELS ARCADE

is....

:..

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
OF! THE
CAMPUS

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EDITORIAL COMMENT

PRESIDENTITIS
(The New York Herald-Tribune)
This malady is only mildly conta-
gious, but having been once contfact-
ed leads rapidly from one stage 'to
another till it becomes incurable. It
is, however, never fatal, save to the
peace of mind. Its most serious effects1
are a chronic irritability and a gen-
erally morbid outlook on life. Yet'it
at the same time causes a species of
optimism that is unknown in any other
disturbance of like character, an
optimism which plays havoc with the
judgment and destroys all sense of
proportion.
A statesman who has not been
touched by the disease after servingI
three terms in the same high office,

Ann Harding-she of "Stolen Fruit"
and the Detroit company of "The
Green Hat"-is now booked for a two
weeks run at the Garrick theater in
Detroit in the role of Letita Tevis in
Gilbert Emery's "Tarnished." Missj
Harding has a pa'rt with rather mea-
ger possibilities as the slavey of a
mother whose chief enjoyment in life!
is being chronically ill and a wander-I
ing father, nicely boulevardier, but
she has built a quite convincing type
as the New York reviews indicate.
"Tarnished" is not a particularly
nice play-it has even been called
sordid by some critics-but it is a
nicely cut out picture of American life
and manners, and has continued to
draw full houses in Detroit. Letita
Tevis is an amiable little Pollyanna,
believing that God is in His heaven un-
til her father cashes a check for $500
and spends it on a scheming manicur-
ist, the Lady of Easy Virtue, played by
Marion Evenson. Letita then goes on
mission to save her father from the'
heavy siren, Nettie Dark, but finds her
lover in that lady's apartment in a I
very evidently clandestine meeting.
Then follows a rather nasty scene
with the gentleman, played by Rollo
Peters, the naughty lady, and Letita
wherein rather dirty remarks are
passed by all concerned-as Alexander
Woolcott cheerfully remarks in tho

Johnston's
& Weber 's
Chocolates
For Mother's Day
Toilet Articles
Stationery
City Pharmacy
118 North Fourth Ave.
Near Bus Station

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Martin Hailer

Furniture-ugs

112 East Liberty S

Leonard Refrigerators
Bear inspection from every angle-Solid ash
cases, pressed corkboard insulation, sealed with
wool felt and asphalted felt, all metal ice rack,
removable drain pipe-white enameled lined
or porcelain lining. There's a size and style
for every purse!
A Three Door Box That Actually
holds 100 lbs. of ice ......$31.5(
"We Ire Headquarters for Leonard Refrigerators.

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How about Sunday dinner
at the Arcade? A delight-
ful meal to be sure and a
pleasure the whole family
will thoroughly enjoy!

3

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