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May 09, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-09

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ESTABLISHED
1890

.4iHt fia

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tl

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

<>fTY. VVVTIY wi.. ynn

I

VUL. XX.XVI. No. 163

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 9, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

_ ,_ _

.,

BRD IN CNTRL APPOINTS
EXECUTIYES OF PUBLICATIONS;
CADY, OLMSTEAD HEARDDRDILY,

GRARA1I BUSINESS MANAGER OF
'ENSIAN; GARGOYLE HEADED
BY ThREE
ABOLISH BANQUET
Will Hold Meeting Tomorrow To Act
On Chimes And Summer Da-y;
Name Board Nominees

ASK MORE APPLICATIONS
I FOR SUMMER DAILY POSTS
Further applications for the
positions of managing editor
and business manager of
( The Summer Daily will be re-
ceived by-the Board in Control of
. . Student Publications until tomor-
I row afternoon when the board
( will meet for the purpose of act-
ing on all applications for these
( positions in addition to the trans-I
( action of other business. All ap-
I plications must be filed at the
I business office of the board in the
I Press building by 2 o'clock to-
morrow.

!Convocation,
Musicale For
Mothers Today
Visiting 'mothers will be the guests
of the Student council and the Wo-
men's league at the second of their
non-denominational convocations this
morning at 11 o'clock in Hill audi-
torium. Dr. Willard L. Sperry, of the
Harvard Theological seminary, will
deliver the main address on "Our part
in the Work of the World."
The School of Music will offer a
program of music for Mother's Day
at 4 o'clock in Hill auditorium to
which all mothers and visiting guests
of students are invited. Palmer Chris-
tian, University organist, Samuel P.
Lockwood, violinist and several other
artists will play.
More than 300 mothers were enter-
tained at the tea and reception given
in the ballroom of the Union by the
Mother's Day committee. There an
opportunity was given for the mothers
to meet members of the faculty with
whom they wished to talk.

Appointments of the Managing Edi-
tor and Business Manager of The
Daily, executives of Gargoyle, and the
business manager of the Michiganen-
sian for next year were made yester-
day by the Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications as well as the nmi-
nation of candidates for student mem-
bers of the board. The annual publi-
cations banquet was discontinued, up-
per .staff appointments to be made by
the executives of the various publica-
tions as soon as desirable, and sepa-
rate banquets to be held early next
fall. Another meeting of the board
will be held tomorrow afternoon for
fihe purpose of determining the future
policy of Chimes, and the appointment
of the managing editor and business
manager of that publication in addi-
tion to those of The Summer Daily.
Smith H. Cady, Jr., '27, was appoint-
ed Managing Editor of ThesDaily for
next year, and Thomas Olmstead, Jr.,
'27, was named Business Manager.
William F. Graham, '27, was selected
as business manager of the Michigan-
ensian, the board having appointed
Louis Robertson, '87, managing editor, 4
a week ago. The position of manag-
ing editor of Gargoyle was discon-
tinued, the editorial staff to be headed
by Fred Hill, '27, as art editor, and
C. R. Swinehart, '27, as literary edi-
tor. John Halstead, '27, was appointed
business manager of Gargoyle.
Nine candidates were named for stu-
dent offices on the board for next year,
three of whom will be elected at the
spring elections next Wednesday. The
nominations were as follows: Fred'
Glover, '27; Forrest Heath, '27; Thom-
as Koykka, '27; Charles Lee, '27; Wil-
liam Mullin, '27; Calvin Patterson, '27;
Sylvan Rosenbaum, '27; Tyler Watson,
'27; and F. E. Wilmot, '27.
In discontinuing the publications
banquet, the board decided that the an-
nual dinner was too large, being usu-
ally attended by 400 or more students
working on campus publcations, and
that it was necessarily held too late
in the yeariwhen functions are nunu-
erous. In its place, banquets will be
held by the staffs of individual publi-
cations shortly after school opens next
fall. It is expected that managing
editors and business managers will
soon announce their upper staffs for
next year.
The future policy of Chimes will be
determined at the board meeting sche-
duled for 4 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon. A number of students now
working on various publications will
be asked to attend the meeting and
give their views relative to the policy
of the campus literary magazine which I
will be followed next year. Those in-
vited to the meeting tomorrow are:
Paul Arnold, '27E; Rudolph Bostel-
man, '27; Smith Cady, Jr., '27; George
W. Davis, '26; James Day, '27; Tleo-
dore Hornberger, '27; William Mullin,
'27; and Neil Staebler, '26.
Other Games
IOWA CITY, May 8.-Iowa lost her
fourth straight baseball game here to-
(ay when itfa ll before Northwestern
11-7 in a ragged game featured by
home runs by Johnson, Wildcat short-
stop, and Perry, outfielder for the
Hawkeyes.
SOUTH BEND, Ind.,May 8.-- Iowa
defeated Notre Dame in a track meetI
here today 76 1-2 to 49 1-2. The west-
erners were strong in the hurdles and
field events and were able to keep even
with Notre Dame in the track events.

1ABO BRINGS UP
SECOND DEFENSE
LINE IN ENGLA
TRADES UNION CONGRESS MAY
CALL OUT ELECTRICAL
AND GAS WORKERS
BRITAIN IN GLOOM
Question Of. Funds To Support Strik.
ers Is Now Becoming Acute
Due To Increase In Numbers
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 8.-Labor's "second
line of defense" is beginning to be
utilized in th-egreat struggle between
!the Trades Union and the government.
These workers were not included in
the general strike which began at
midnight last Monday.
The Trades Union congress has not
yet issued a call to this second line,
and there is grave apprehension that
the leaders may officially call out both
the second and third lines of defense,
thus increasing the number of strik-
ers to possibly six millions.
"The second and third lines of de-
fense" are composed of electrical and
gas workers and those engaged in
other public utilities, numbering from
two to three million men. Such work-
ers are customarily permitted by the
Trades Unions to remain at their!
posts for the purpose of furnishing the
absolute needs of tne nation.
Gloom such as Great Britain has notf
known since the Great War ended has
settled over the British Isles as the
first week of the general strike drew
to a close. It is just one week ago,
May day, that the miners laid down
their tools and abandoned the mine
fields to the "safety men." They
numbered more than a million, and
the other workers who joined them
increased the number to about three
million.
(Continued on Page Three)
GOPHERSDEFEATE
BY~~~~ MIHGNC5

II
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Announcement
Of Cap Night
Speakers Made
Cap night, the traditional ceremony
where the freshmen burn their grey
"pots" to signify their entrance into
the ranks of the sophomore class; will
be celebrated next Friday night in
Sleepy Hollow. On this occasion the
class of '29 will form a huge circle
around a bonfire and throw their caps
into the fire to the singing of "Where,
Oh, Where are the verdant freshmen?"
Three speakers have been chosen to
give addresses to the assembled un-
dergraduates, Frank L. Mulholland,
'99L, will represent the alumni, Shir-
ley Smith, secretary of the University,
will represent the faculty and William
Cudlip, '26L, will speak for the stu-
deist body. Mr. Mulholland is an
alumnus of prominence, having been
president of Rotary Internationale and
an attorney of note in Toledo where
he is now practicing
Coach Fielding H-. Yost, Director of
Intercollegiate Athletics, will present
the "Al" blankets to the senior ath-
letes who have won letters in the ma-l
jor sports. Kenneth Kellar, '26, presi-
dent of the Student council will in-
troduce all the speakers.
Members of the committee for Cap
night are working on a plan to pro-
vide a free show for all students after
the ceremonies are over. Definite an-
nouncement of the plans for this en-
tertainment will be published in a few
days.
,SOPHOMORES TAKEG9 IS -1

i
r
I
i

' COMPULSORY CHAPEL IS
DISCONTINUED AT YALE
(By Associated Press)
NE HAVEN, Conn., May 8.
The discontinuance of compul-
sory chapel for Yale university
undergraduates was approved by
the Yale corporation today, Sec-
retary R. M. Hutchins announced.
The move was made after "due
consideration of the recommen-
I dation of the faculty of Yale col-
lege that the requirements of at-
tendance at chapel services be
discontinued," the announcement
states.

Michigan
One

Leader PIartIcipates In Only
Event; Places First In
Mlfe Run

WLVERINES WIN DUAL MEET
WITH BUCKEYES,----53, AS
__ OHIO'S TRAgCK CAPTAIN STARSH

OfIdia

GUTHRIE MAKES 11 POINTS; CAP.
TURES TWO hURDLE
EVENTS
HESTER TAKES 100

Ballot

ALL CAMPUS ELECTION, WEDN4ESDAY, MAY 12

INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a cross in the square([
the name of the candidate for whom you wish to

]) before
vote.

Michigan Union
(All Men Vote)
(Vote for One)
PRESIDENT

Students' Christian
Association
(All Men Vote)
(Vote for One)
PRESIDENT

i

Third Succe'she Victory For
O f' Scoria; Takeo All
Secolld-D~ay Evenits

CltSSI

[
c
cI

]
]
]

DANIEL S. WARNER
LESTER JOHNSON
HOWELL RUSS

[
[
[

}
J

MERIAM C. HERRICK
ALBERT O. FLINDT
GEORGE II. LIKERT

Fuckelwartz, Edgar Star At
Jablonowski Pitches
Good Game

Bat;

[
[
[

]I
]
]

RECORDING SECRETARY
PAUL STARRETT
ROBERT F. PRICE
WALTER A. KUENZEL
LITERARY VICE PRES.
(Vote Only for One and Only
in Your Dept.)

Those who vote express themselves
as being in favor with the objects of
the Student Christian Association.

I{
[
[

I
11
1

ELLIOTT CHAMBERLAIN
JOHN M. HALSTED
STANFORD N. PHELPS

Oratorical
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
ROBERT S. MILLER
EMANUEL J. HARRIS
VICE PRESIDENT
JAMES T. HERALD
JEROME MEITZEL

ENGINEERING VICE PRES-

I[
[

]
]

II
[

7
]

[
[

]

LAWRENCE BUELL, JR.
GEORGE M. STANLEY
LAW VICE PRES.
FRANCIS T. O'BRIEN
JOHN M. BENNETT
ELIMER II. SALZMAN
MEDIC VICE PRES.
ROBERT W. WILKINS
KENNETH M. DAVENPORT
COMBINED VICE PRES.
RUDOLPH E. LARSON
LEE C. FOWLE

[

I
]

FRIEDMAN INJURED
(Special to The Daily)
MINNEAPOLIS, May 8.-Michigan
"efeated Minnesota today in one of
the hardest fought games that has
ever been played on the local dia-
nond. Rain threatened to take the
game from the Wolverines, but after
three halts the sun broke through and
from then on either team could have
taken the game. Michigan had her
biggest thrill in the ninth inning, when
Ascher, the first man up, tripled. Ser-'
line followed with a hard grounder
to Neville, who made a beautiful stop,
throwing Serline out and holding
Ascher at third. Jablonowski struck
out Mason, Edgar tagged Ascher at
the plate retiring tue side.
The tenth proved fatal for Ander-
son. Wilson, first inan up, walked.
Lange followed with a single. Ooster-
filled, Edgar singled and two runners
crossed the plate. Puckelwartz and
Edgar starred at bat while Neville,
was easy the shining light of the in-
field. Friedman was forced to leave
the game due to an injury. Jablonow-
ski pitched a great game allowing
only five hits which were well scat-
tered. The Gophers scored two runs
when Puckelwartz dropped an easy
fly.
Michigan is playing by far the best
ball she has played this year. A vic-
Cory over Iowa Monday would
strengthen her championship hopes
considerably.

HEAT DOWNS SEVERAL
Capturing all three of the events
yesterday, the sophomores overcame
the 2-0 lead that the freshmen had
secured when they took the tug-of-war
Friday, and won the Spring games by
a final score of 3-2. This was the'third
successive victory for the class of '28
in tire conflicts between the under-
classmen.
In the obstacle race, which was the i
first event yesterday, the sophomores
took two consecutive heats, thereby
winning one point. The second heat
was contested because the sophomore
runner picked up the wromng baton atj
the first wall in the course. Both menI
reached the wall together tossing their
batons over ahead of them. Thel
sophomore sprinter scaled the wall
first and in looking for his baton
picked up the wrong one, delaying the
freshman. It was the officials' de-
cision that, in fairness to the first'
year class, the lap should be ru n
again, The same men participated and
the race was again won by the soph'o-
imores.
The horse and rider contest, taken
from the games of several years ago,
went to the sophomores also, who un-
seated seven of their opponents, while'
only four of their own riders were
forced to the ground. This event
counted one point toward the games.
With the score 2-2 the final success
depended upon thesoutcome of the
rope tying contest. Although thej
sophomores were outnumbered, during
the 15 minute period they succeeded1
in tying and confining in their pen 73
freshmen to their adversaries' 51.
There were no serious injuries inI
the contest although several partici-
pants were overcome by .the heat and
the exertion of the conflict. They were
revived within a short time and werej
reported by the officials to be without ,
injury.
Instead of having the customary
pick-up bands to play for the games,
members of the Varsity Reserve bandi
formed the nucleus of each organiza-
tion.
MA WILL PROTEC
NICARAGUN PROPERTYi
MANAGUA, Nic., May 8.-United
States marines have been landed at1
Bluefields to protect American lives
and property, as a result of the cap-;
ture of the town and El Bluff by lib-
eral revolutionists. The Nicaraguan
government is watching all ports to
guard against the importation of arms
from Mexico to assist the revolution-
ists.
I )IIMES WILL GIVE EXTRA
i# 1 WING O F "GLENCAIRN" II
~ ~ ~~t

SPERRY TO SPEAK
A SEVICE TODAYI
Harvard Theological Seminary Dean
Will Discuns "Our Fart In
Work Of World"
WAS RHODES SCHOLAR
Dr. Willard L. Sperry, dean of the
Harvard Theological seminary, will
address students, guests, and faculty
at the second Sunday convocation of
the Student council at 11 o'clock today
in Hill auditorium. Dr. Sperry will
speak on the subject "Our Part In
The Work Of The World."
Dr. Sperry is known as a liberal in'
the Congregational church and enjoys
a reputation in the East as a capable
and forceful speaker. He was gradu-
ated from Olivet college in Michigan
in 1903 and was later selected as a
Rhodes scholar, being in residence at
Oxford from 1903 to 1907. He re-,
ceived his master's degree from Yale
university in 1909. He became an as-
sistant pastor in the First Congrega-
tional church of Fall River, Mass. later
becoming pastor. For two years Ile
was the minister of the Central Con-
gregational church in Boston and in
1917 he became a professor of theol-
ogy in Harvard Theological seminary
He has since become the dean of that
school and occupies an important post
in religious education.
1oward Y. McClusky, of the psy-
chology department of the University,
will give the prayer and William J.
Skeat, graduate of the School of Mu-
sic will be at the organ. Julius Nie-
haus, S. of M., will give a solo as part
of the musical program and a hymn
will be sung by-the audience. "
Members of the Student council ex-
tended an invitation to the visiting
mothers to be present at the convo-
cation, being planned as it is for Uni-
versity students and faculty.
The convocation begins promptly at
11 o'clock.
Track Captain
Awarded Prize
fIn Scholarship
Richard H. Freyberg, '26, star miler
and captain of the Wolverine track
team, was awarded the Conference
medal for all round excellence in
scholarship and athletics for the year
1926, according, to an announcement
made last nightby the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics.
This medal, provided by the West-
ern Conference, is awarded each year
1 by the faculty of each Conference
member to the "student of the grad.
uating class of each institution who
has attained the greatest proficiency
in athletics and scholarship." The
award is made at Michigan by a com-
mittee of seven made up of the ap-
pointed Senate members of th ath-
letic board.
The committee this year, Professor
Aigler said, was extremely emharras:;-
ed in making the selection by the fact
that no less than three members of
this year's graduating class distinctly
merited such recognition as is given
by the medal. Only by a system of
preferential balloting was it possible
for the committee finally to choose the
medalist. Harry Hawkins, '26E, foot-
ball nnd trnack str N P Fn5ninzer.

By Joseph Kruger
Michigan's well-balanced track team
scored a decisive victory over the
Ohio State squad yesterday afternoon
I at Ferry field in the annual dual meet,
the final total reading 82-53.
Competition proved to be especially
keen in the track events, but the Wol-
verines showed to advantage, in the
field events, slamming in the pole
vault and discus throw. Michigan
scored nine first places, tied for an-
other, and secured eight second and
eight third places in amassing their
grand total.
Capt. George Guthrie of the Ohio
team was the outstanding star of th
afternoon's competition, the fleet
Buckeye star accounting for 11 points,
the highest individual total, and break-
ing the field record for the 120 yard
highhurdles and equalling the field
mark for the 220 yard low hurdle
event. Guthrie also took third in the
broad jump. Leschinsky also tied a
field record when he sprinted his way
to a thrilling victory in the 220 yard
dash in 21 2-10 seconds, after follow-
ing Grimm, of Ohio, who took second,
for the first 100 yards.
Phil Northrop, three event star of
the Wolverine team, accounted for 10
points when he won his favorite event,
the javelin, took second in the broad
jump and tied for second in the pole
vault.
George Hester's brilliant dash in the
100 yard race proved to be another
feature of the meet, the diminutive
sprint star chalking up his sixth
straight victory of the year when he
breasted the tape in first place in :9
7-10. Leschinsky was second and
Grimm, of Ohio, third.
Capt. Dick Freyberg confined hs
day's activities to the one mile run,
which he won with a safe advantage
in 4:24 5-10. The Michigan leader
took the lead at the start of the third
lap and was never headed.
Feinsinger captured the quarter
mile run after one of the most thrilling
races of the day. Feinsinger and
Herrnstein took the lead, but Bevan
Ohio star, passed the latter on the
first turn. The three men then sprint-
ed down the final stretch closely
bunched, and hit the tape with their
positions unchanged. The time waj
49 1-10.
Kennedy, holder of the one mile In
door Conference record, was saved for
the two mile event, and the star Buck-
eye runner took first place in 9:44
1-10, about 40 yards ahead of Roy Cal-
lahan, who took second.
Guthrie had things his own way n
the high hurdles, when he stepped
the timbers in the new record time of
:14 5-10. Snider and Schroeder, of
Michigan finished second and third,
respectively, when Powers, of Ohio,
was disqualified for knocking down
three hurdles. Guthrie took his ninth
hurdle as his rivals were going over
their eighth.
Guthrie was given closer competi-
tion in the low hurdles by his team-
mate Irwin, who took second and Las-
ser, of Michigan, who finished third.
The two Ohio runners were fairly
even for the entire distance while Las-
ser came from seventh place at the
third hurdle to break in the scoring.
Michigam scored her first slam when
Dick Doyle, Schravesand and Mun
took all three places in'- the discus,
Doyle winning with a heave of 131
feet 5 inches. He hurled the discus
137 feet 7 inches, in trying for a nevr
record. The other slam came in the
pole vault when Percy Prout contin-
ued his good work by taking the event
at 12 feet 6 inches. Northrop and Huff
tied for second and third.
Charles Munz made his best mark
in competition when lie threw the shot
45 feet 5 inches in trying for a record,
after winning the event, while Harry
Hawkins threw the hammer 149 feet
11 inches in his attempt to set a new
mark for the event.

SECRETARY

[

]
]

FLORENCE POLLOCK
MARGARETTE I. NICKOLS

TREASURER

[
[

]
]

[L

]

THOMAS V. KOYKKA
ROBERT E. MINNICK

C
[

3
]

Board in Control of
Student Publications
(Entire Campus Vote)

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
- PRESIDENT

1
3
7i

THOMAS KOYKKA
W. C. PATTERSON
WILLIAM MULLIN
FRED GLOVER
TYLER WATSON
CHARLES LEE
FORREST HEATH
F. F. WILMOT
SYLVAN ROSENBAUM

BOX SC
Michig
Loos, ss..........
W ilson, 11) ........
Lange, if..........
Oosterbaan, rf ....
Edgar, c ..........
Puckelwartz, cf ....
Kubicek, 2b.......
Friedman, 3b......
Jablonowski, p ....
Neville.............

ORE
;an
AB
3 0
4 1
4 1
4 0
5 1
4 1
5 0
2 0
3 0
0 1

LAFAYETTE, Ind., May 8.-Taking [
all places in the broad jump, highI [
hurdles, and low hurdles, the Uni- [
versity of Chicago downed Purdue
here today 79-56. McKinney, Chicago,
was high scorer with 18 points.
[
BLOOMINGTON, May 8.-The Ohio j[
State university golf team defeated [
Indiana 13-11 here today.[
-V.atherMia [
FRKHIR~mMTOGWR same -11

i
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1
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1

II
0
0
1
1
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2
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0
0
0

PO
0
6
5
2
12
1
0
'1
0

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2
1
0
0
1
0
1
2
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1

]
7

THOMAS H. CAVANAUGH
THOMAS V. KOYKKA
CALVIN PATTERSON

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES

J
7

JAMES F. BOYER
THEODORE R. HORNBERGER
FREDERIC S. GLOVER, JR.
RUSSELL C. BAKER
LAWRENCE BUELL, JR.
ROBERT T. DEVORE
II. R. STEVENSON
KENNETH A MHICHEL

Board in Control of
Athletics
- (Entire Campus Vote)
. ,1VI ~ itIl - TP 7yk, rl Ari . A .II

S
G
N
A
S

Totals ...........34 5
Ytinnesota
AB R
tark, ss........... 6 0
uzy, lb..........4 2
ydahl, If.......... 3 0
scher, 31) .........4 0
erline. cf ........ 4 1

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HI
0
0
0

PO
2
13
2
2,
2

A
0
1
0
2
0

E
0
0
0
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8 30 10 3

IAROUSES SE T INTEREST
PHILADELPHIA. May 8. - Bible

is

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