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May 08, 1926 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-08

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4 ...

ESTABLISHED
1890

4lkPP
t an

uiI1 A

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

---- --------- --

a

,

VOL. XXXVI. No. 162

TWELVE PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1926

TWELVE PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

THREE HOM RUNE
FEATURE MICHIGAR
WIN OVER BAD6ERS
BADGERS GAIN EARLY LEAD:
WALTER FINISHES GAME
ON MOUND
GAME ENDS 6 - 4
Loos And Wilson Hit Home Runs For
.Michigan'; Miller Lost To Teamn
For Both Gaines
TEAM LEAVES MADISON
(Special to The Daily)
MADISON, Wis., May 7.- MIchl-
gan's baseball team left here to.
night for Minneapolis, where they
will' meet the Minnesota team to-
morrow in the second game of
their road trip. Immediately after
the Gopher contest, Coach Fisher's
men will entrain for Ann Arbor,
where they will meet Iowa on
Monday in their sixth Conference
game.

r
'I

_I

II

i

HEADS OF PUBLICATIONS
TO BE APPOINTED TODAY

i

Annual appointments of the
managing editors and business
managers of The Daily, The
Summer Daily, Gargoyle, Chimes,
and the business manager of the
Michiganensian will be made this
afternoon by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Other business that will be
transacted by the board will be
the nomination of student mem-
hers of that body for next year,
three of whom will be elected at
the spring elections Wednesday.

fI
.(.

l

MADISON, Wis., May 7.-Michigan's
Varsity nine defeated Wisconsin here
today by a 6-4 score in a game that
was featured by three home runs,
Miichigan players making two and
Murphy of Wisconsin the third.
Badgers Take Early Lead
The Badgers started off with a rush,
getting to Jablonowski, Wolverine
hurler, for a run in both the first and
second innings. Michigan's first tally
came in the third inning after two
were out. Jablonowski drew a base
on balls, Loos singled, and Wilson
scored the pitcher with a double, Loos
stopping at third. With a man on sec-
ond and third Lange hit an easy
grounder and the side was retired.
Walter went to the mound for the
Wolverines in the last half of the
third inning and with the exception of
the sixth and seventh innings held the
Badgers helpless.
Loos hits Home Run
Michigan took the lead in the fifth
inning when Loos hit a home run withI
a man on base ahead -of him. Two
more counters were added by the Wol-
verines in the sixth.inning when Oos-
terbaari singled and scored on Puckel-
wartz' double. Pucklewartz scored on
an error.
Wisconsin broke into the scoring
column again in the last half of the
sixth inning and pushed their final
run across the plate in the seventh
frame. Captain Wilson concluded the
Michigan scoring when he drove the
ball into deep left for a home run in
the seventh inning.
Miller Out Of Gamie
Don Miller, star right hander, who
was expected to start against Wiscon-
sin today was unable to do so on ac-
count of illness and will also be un-
available in tomorrow's contest with
Minnesota as Coach Fisher has sent
him home to Ann Arbor in the hope
that he will have sufficiently recover-
ed on Monda to see service either on
the mound or n left field against Iowa1
on Ferry field.

}.

WHYTE ISCUSSE[S
INDIAN SELF-RULE1
Believes England Is Not Cause Of
Failure Of India To Gai
Self-Governient
OUTLINES DIFFICULTIES
India's difficulties in achieving
self-government are not due to the im-
perialism of Great Britain, but to
causes inherent in India itself, stated
Sir Frederick Whyte, former president
of the legislative assembly of India,
yesterday in the last of a series of
three lectures. The chief of these
causes, according to Sir Frederick, are
the Indian religious beliefs, the ac-
quiesence to any political status, and
the lack of a tradition of military ser-
vice.
India., the speaker asserted, has
gained the greater profit of the two in
the existing relationship between
Great Britain and its eastern depend-
ency. The imperial executives in
India are still apparently as dicta-
torial as ever, but they are encour-
againg the development of self-gov-
ernment. That the subject people are
responding to that encouragement is
shown by the recent action of the leg-
islature in passing a tariff on import-
ed steel, including that from England,
and by the "Indianization" of num-
erous institutions and industries.
Although there is no actual provi-
sion in the constitution of India mak-
ing the ministry responsible to te
legislature, they are in fact responsive
Ito it, Sir Frederick continued, and the
part of the assembly in the govern-
ment is becoming increasingly impor-r
tant.
The first change from an unmitigait-
ed aristocracy in the Indian govern-
mnent came in 1909 under Lord Mor-
ley, it was explained. In 1919, there
was a reform in the constitution re-
sulting in the present administrative
system, characterized by an increased
participation of the individual natives
in civil and administrative service,,
and a realization of the Indian gov-
ernment as an integral part of the
British empire.
The Indian religious ideas, Sir Fred-
crick stated, are such that the natives
believe in working out their salvation
by forsaking the earth, while the west-
ern world's aim is to take an active
part in the affairs of the world. This
difference, he said, tends to create a
lack of interest in western political
methods on the part of the Indians.
The natives have not cared greatly for
the form of their government, and
have been acquiescent under any kind
of administration. In recent years,
however, the awakening of a spirit of
nationalism has started India on its
progress toward self-government. 1
VARSITY BAND TO PLAY
FOR TRACK MEET TODAY1
For the first time in the history of
the organization, the Varsity band will
play at the track meet, which will be
held at 2:30 o'clock today at Ferry
field.-
The work of the band at the football
games is traditional, but due to the
efforts of Capt. Wilfred Wilson, di-
rector of the band, and Gordon Pack-
er,,d major, the organization
has enlarged its scope of activities.
Besides the usual concerts and ap-
pearances at games, the band has giv-
en a recital of classical music in Ann
Arbor, concerts throughout the state,
including a concert with the Glee club
in the Coliseumin Detroit, and will
now appear in uniform at the track
meets.

Oppose Changing
Prohibition Law
(py Associated Press)
ATLANTA, Ga., May 7.-Resolutions
opposing modification of the prohibi-

S. C. A. Will
Ask Funds For
Vacation Camp
Opportunity will be given on Tues-
day to every student, faculty member
and townsman to contribute to the]
sixth annual drive for funds for thej
University of Michigan Fresh Airj
camp, which is conducted by the Stu-
dent Christian association, according1
to John S. Denton, '27, chairman of
the, drive committee. The committee
will attempt -to raise $1,500 to cover!
the expenses of giving vacations t1
more than 400 poor and needy boys in
this part of the state. Ten day vaca-
tion periods with all expenses paid,
are given to groups of youngsters
chosen from the community centers of
Detroit, Ann Arbor, Flint and a few
other cities.
The policy of the camp, as outlined
by Egbert Isbell, '26L, superintendent, I
and which the leaders contract to car- I
ry out provides for the teaching of
the wonders and beauties of nature-
the essentials of personal hygiene,
first aid and swimming-how to co-
operate and live with others, involv-
ing fair play and sportsmanship-and
withal to foster and develop a genuine1
reverence for the sacred things of
life and a quest for the best that life
has to offer.
This drive has been made every year
on the campus for the past five years;
last year more than $1,200 was collect-
ed on the day of the drive and more
came in later through check subscrip-
tion. Several campus organizations
will be engaged in putting this drive
across. Sphinx, Triangles, Druids and
the "M" club will solicit subscriptions
at various places on the campus on the
day of the drive.
Hover Predicts
Good Choruses
In Next Opera!
Prospects for exceptional chorus
work again in next year's Union opera
are already apparent, according to
Roy Hoyer, who is in Ann Arbor ar-
ranging the musical comedy's dances
for the sixth year. Despite the fact
that Mr. Hoyer arrived only last Mon-
day, coming direct from Albany, N.
Y., where "Stepping Stones" finished
its season on Sunday, he stated yester-
day that he is highly pleased with theI
rudimentary work of the chorus try-
outs already displayed.
"Even though the choruses of "Tam-
bourine" were the most oustanding:
they have ever been in the history of1
the opera, the talent shown so far this
year in both the men's and women's I
groups is fully equal to that display- I
ed a year ago,' said Mr. Hoyer. "In ,'
the short space of less than two weeks1
one group has already completed a<
routine."
It is quite possible that the women'sc
pony chorus will be revived in next
year's opera, Mr. Iloyer believes, in
view of the unusually large number of
tryouts this year and the likelihoodf
that such a chorus can easily be I
adapted to the book for next winter.1
Special dance numbers will also be c
featured by at least a half dozen mem-
hers of the choruses.c
(Continued on Page Eight)
Company Sues
Robbery Trios
Suit was begun in Circuit court yes-
terday by the Royal Indemnity coi-
p~any, insurance representatives of the
bijou Theatrical Enterprise, Inc., fort
the amount Mr. and Mrs. Alexander P.
Strauss and Robert L. McHenry, Jr.,,
are accused of taking frm the Ma- I
jestic theater in the counterfeit hold-1
up and robbery on March 8th.

Attorneys of the company filed a
writ of garnishment claiming the sumI
of $5,000 from the defendants. Upon
their declaration that Sgt. Frank Keihl I
of the police department had in his
possession money belonging to the de-j
fendants, Sergeant Keihl has been'
summoned to the court and asked to!
surrender the property.
The police sergeant is reported to
have accompanied Alexander Strauss
to Detroit shortly after his arrest andi
to have received a check for $2,500,(
Strauss' share of the money. Sergeant
Keihl claims that he is holding the
money, pending the outcome of the
criminal proceedings.

FRESHMEN CAPTURE
LEAD IN STRUGGLE
SOPHOMORES WIN ONLY ONE OF
THREE HEATS; ARE
OUTNUMBERED
WILL CLASH TODAY
Horse And Eider Contest, Obstacle
Race, And Rope Tying Event
Will Decide Games
TODAY'S PROGRAM
9:00-Sophomores meet at Water-
man gymnasiunm; Fresh.
'men assemble at the
Union.
9:30-Fresluen march to South
Ferry field.
9:10--The second year class
leaves for the contests.
10:00-The Spring games start.
With the decision in the second and
third tugs going to the freshmen, two,
points toward the Spring games were
awarded the class in the tug-of-war
yesterday. The sophomores were able
to capture only the first of the three
pulls.-
Frederick M. Asbeck, captain of the
freshman, won the toss of the coin
just prior to the games and chose
the east bank of the Huron river for
his class. The sophomores arrived at
the scens of conflict first, followed by
their opponents, both classes' led by
their bands, composed of members of
the Varsity Reserve band together
with other members of the respective
sides. The sophomore band took a
position in the river where they re-
mained during the entire contest. Only
the freshmen were daubed with paint,'
their opponents refraining from the
use of the customary red for the after-
noon.
Sophomores Win First Heat
The first pull was between picked
teams of 50 men, and resulted in a
win for the sophomores, who dragged
the opposing group 30 feet, according
to the dcision of Harry I-awkins, '26E,
referee of the games. In the secondl
tug, the first year men gained an ad-'
vantage of 25 feet during the 10 mi-
ute period.
With a win for each of the classes,E
the result of the afternoon contest1
depended upon the free-for-all. The'
sophomores were outnumbered, as ist
customary in the spring events, and1
although they gained a few feet onr
their adversaries at the outset, it was1
soon lost and they were dragged<
across the river. The entire team1
took the ducking, refusing to drop theP
rope until they had reached the op-1
posite bank and the contest had been
closed by the referee's gun.t
Today's struggle between the under-
classmen will consist of three events,t
starting at 10 o'clock, the first off
which will be the obstacle race. It
will be a relay run of three heats,
four men on a team, and the partici-
pants will be compelled to leapt
hurdles, crawl through barrels, andl
climb fences during the run. The
winner of two of the heats will receivet
one point in the games.r
Horse And Rider Contest <
For the first time in several years,
the horse and rider contest will be.
used in the Spring games. Each class1
has 11 man teams, each consisting of
a man who is the "horse" an,1 hisr
rider, the object being to unsaddle as
many riders as possible, one point go-
ing to the side acgomplishing this re-
sult.
The games will be closed by the cus-
tonary rope tying contest ill which
the classes will participate as a body.
Ropes will be furnished the contest-
ants, who will be given a 15 minute
period to catch, tie their opponents, I

and place them in pens, which will,
be constructed at each end of South1
Ferry field. The class which succeeds1
in tying the most men will be awarded t
one point toward the games. It will
be necessary for each side to keep
their captives in their pens until after
the 15 minute period as, unlike pre-1
vious years, they will not be counted
until after the contest.
All "M" men and junior honorary
society men are again asked to of-
ficiate at the games today. They will
meet at 9 o'clock at the Union.
Henry Ford Helps
To Put Out Blaze

The labor upheaval in Great Brit-
ain involves 2,525,000 workers in
most of the principal industries of
the country. Againistthese the gov-
erment can at need muster the
500,000 men in the army, navy, air
force and militia and the 75,000 vol-
unteers in Admiral Viscount Jelli-
coe's organization for the mainten-
ance of supplies.
The trades affected by the strike
-the general council of the Trades
Union congress has designated
which are to quit-and the number
in each are:
Mimers .................. 1,120,000
Railway men............410,000
Railway clerks .......... . 60,000
Builders ................ 300,000
Transport workers........330,000
Seamen..................60,000
Printers ..................120,01)0
Ironworkers............. 100,000
ElectriciansS.....;......25,000

f

CAMp PUS PPARS
TO HONOR MOTHERS,
(Guests To See Spring Games Today;
Will Tour Campus And Attend
Faulty-Student Tea

ON FARM RELIEF
Representatives Near Conclusion Of
Ha ugen, Tincher, Curtis-4swell
Controversy

Why of British Strike; Men Involved

MAY HEAR DR. SPERRYIPROHIBITION DISCUSSEDI

Mother's Week-end activities startI
in earnest this morning with the
Spring games on south Ferry field at
10 o'clock, when the visiting mothers
will have an opportunity of seeing the
semi-annual struggle between the two
underclasses. The tug-of-war held
yesterday afternoon was a preliminary
to the final-contest this morning.
In the early afternoon, the guests
will have the option of taking a
tour of the campus, visiting all the
more important buildings, or attend-
ing Michigan-Ohio track meet, which
will be held on Ferry field at 2:30
o'clock. A faculty-student tea and
reception will be held in the main
ballroom of the Union at 4 o'clock,
where the mothers may meet members,
of ;the faculty and their wives. All
members of the faculty have been' is-
sued a general invitation and it is ex-
pected that several hundred of them
will be present. Through a recep-
tion committee of students, it will be
possible for any mother to meet any
member of the faculty with whom she
may wish to talk. For a short time
during the reception, music will be
rendered by students of the School of
Music; but no definite program will
be presented. Tea and refreshments
will be served by a committee under
the direction of Mrs. Fielding H.
Yost and wives of several other fac-
ulty members. Decorations have been
furnished from the University bo-
tanical gardens.
Tomorrow morning, the second Stu-
dent council convocation will be open
to all the visiting guests. Dr. Willard
L. Speery, of the Harvard Theological
seminary will be the main speaker at
this time. A program especially ar-
ranged for Mother's day by the School
of Music will be presented in Hill
auditorimn at 4 o'clock in the after-
noon. Palmer Christian, Samuel P.i
Lockwood and several other artists
will appear in this concert. All visit-
ing mothers and guests are cordially
invited to attend.
Daugherty, King,
Miller Indicted
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, May 7.-The special
Federal grand jury investigating the'
sale of the American Metal company,
today indicted Harry M. Daugherty,
former United States attorney-general,
Thomas W. Miller, former alien prop-
erty custodian, and John T. King, for-
mer Republican national committee-
man, for conspiracy to defraud the
government.
The grand jury, concluding investi-
gations begun last January, charged
Daugherty, Miller, and King with' con-
spiracy to defraud the government in
connection with the transfer of seven
million dollars of American Metal
company bonds from the custody of
the government to Suissgpour Daleurs
De Metaus, a Swiss company alleged
to have been German owned.
TirviN.T 11oinDip

Box sc
Loos, ss..........
Wilson, lb.......
L.ange, if ........
Edgar, c.........
Oosterbaan, rf.
Puckelwartz, cY..
Kubicek, 2b......
Frideman, 3b.....
Jablonowski, p ....
Walter, p........

The difficulty is the result of a
long drawn out dispute in the coal
industry. The owners contended
the industry could not afford pres-
ent wages unless hours of work
were lengthened. The government
has been paying a subsidy to make
up the existing scale, but this was
discontinued May 1. The owners
refused to pay more and the strike
was called last Saturday.
The government takes the atti-
tude that the men's position is a
challenge to British freedom. It is
prepared to use troops to keep or-
der and voluntary aid to transport
the necessities of life.
The unions say they have been
forced into their present position.
A. J. Cook, the miners' secretary,
issued a slogan for the strike as
follows: "Not a penny off wages,
not a minute on working hours."

core
gall
AB
5
5
4
4'
4
4
3
4
0
3

(By Associated Press
WASHINGTON, May 7-The House
today swung into the home stretch
of the four-day period set aside for
debate on the Haugen, Tincher, and
Curtis-Aswell farm relief bills. The
half-way post was rounded at a ses-
sion Thursday night and indications
.pointed to members again sitting till
well afterdark.
So far only a handful have spoken
and little positive indication has been
given as to the trend of sentiment, al-
though friends of each proposal hold
the drift to be their way.
Each has been explained by its au-]
thor, Representative Tincher, Repub-1
lican, Kansas, completing the trio by
taking the floor in behalf of his meas-
ure Thursday night. As yet, however,
no party leaders have spoken and their'
paternal voices are awaited to give the
first definite clew of prospective line-
ups.
Prohibition, meanwhile, has bobbed
up anew in the situation, with Repre-
sentative Black, Democrat, New York,
contending in a statement that is the
reason farm relief is needed and ass-
serting that "the answer to the farm
problem is light wine and beer."
PLANS LAID FOR SELING
STOCK IN HOTEL PROJECT
After several meetings ending in
dleadlocks, the committees working on
Ann Arbor's proposed municipal ho-
tel have arrived at a decision regard-
ing the sale of stock in the new build-!
ing. According to a statement by the
executive committee, 3,500 shares of
common stock are to be issued at $100
I a share, payable over a period of 14
months.
The organization directing the proj-
ect is to be called the Citizens Hotel
company of Ann Arbor and will build
a structure at an approximate cost
of $488,000, which will have from 100
to 125 guest rooms. Its presence is
expected by Ann Arbor citizens to do
nuch in relieving the housing problem
during the football season.z
Control is to be kept in the hands
of the townspeople, although an oper-
ating company may be selected to
manage the hotel.
ELECTION REISTRATION'
EXTENDED ANOTHER DAY.
In order to provide every oppor-
,tunity for all students to vote at the
spring elections Wednesday, cntin-
ued registration will be held at one
booth on the campus on Monday. The
booth in the middle of the diagonal
opposite the Library will be open to
registration for students of all schools
from 9 to 2:30 o'clock on that day.
Registration the first twosdays ex-
ceeded that of last year by some 500,
it was stated by members of the Stu-
;dent council last night, with' some im-
provement shown yesterday in the in-
terest displayed by women students
over Thursday. From present indi-
cations more than 5,000 students will
be entitled to vote at the campus elec-
tion, it was stated.

BRITISH STRIKE
REACHES FIFTH
DAY; SHOWS NO
516NSA__ PEACE1
BOTH SIDES AIE READY TO US
STRONGER FORCES IN
CONFLICT
ARE DEADLOCKED
Trades Uion Congress Threatens To
Call Out Two Millioli More
English Workers
SOVIET AIDS STRIKERS
(By Associated Press)
MOSCOW, May 7.-The general
concllof the trades unions of th
Onionof Soiet Socialist Rpub-
lies, has transferred two million
rubles to the British Trades Union
congress. This is the second in.
stallment of the collection being
made among the Soviet unions to
ald the British strikers. Sub-
scriptions are still coming in.
LONDON, May 7.-Neither side of
the strike dispute shows the slightest
disposition of yielding to the other as
Great Britain's great industrial strug-
gle goes into its fifth day today. On
the contrary, there is a tendency to
use stronger forces on both sides. The
government is enrolling thousands of
additional volunteers to substitute for
the strikers and anhounces it will re-
inforce the relief recruiting, if possi-
ble, by 50,000 special constables.
On its side, the Trades Union con-
gress is talking of calling out its see-
ond line of defense which', it claims,
would add another two million per-
sons to the strikers.
As far as the general public is con-
cerned, things seem to be growing
easier daily. The organization pro-
vided by the government and volunteer
efforts, especially for transport, is
continually improving, with a subse-
quent lessening of public inconveni-
once.
No Serious Disorders
A notable feature of the gigantic
conflict, now at the end of its fourth
day, is the complete absence of serious
disorders; not a single death has been
laid to the strike. In almost all pre-
vious miner's strikes, there was con-
siderable trouble in (the coal fields, but
on this occasion they are remarkably
free from disorder.
Although there were vague rumors
today that a possible settlement was
imminent, so far as the general pub-
lie is concerned peace has still made
no headway. Nothing appears as yet
'to have developed from the unofficial
talk between Premier Baldwin and J.
H. Thomas, who, as head of the rail-
way men's union, is looked to as the
man most likely to bring peace be-
tween the government and the trades
Iunions.
"'rhe British Worker," mouthpiece
of the strikers, in tonight's issue, says
that the council of the Trades Union
I congress wishes it to be clearly under-
stood that no official or unofficial
overtures have been made to the go=
ernment by any individual or group of
individuals, either with or without the
sanction of the general council. The
council declared further 'that it is
ready at any moment to enter into
preliminary discussions regarding
withdrawal of the lock-out notices
and the ending of the general stoppage
1 and the resumption of negotiations for
the honorable settlement of the min-
'ng dispute, but added that "the pre-
liminary discussion must be free from
any condition."

Government Reimalis irnm
As the government insists on the
unconditional withdrawal of the strike
notices, there seems no basis of ap-
proach between the two sides. Never-
theless, J. Ramsay MacDonald, the for-
iner Labor premier, and the parhia-
pmentary Labor party are still doing
everything possible to promote peace.
A. J. Cook, secretary of the miners'
federation, and Frank Hodges, secre-
tary of the Miners' International fed-
e ration, who has arranged to go to
Ostend for the International Miners'
conference opening tomorrow, can-
celled their journey tonight. They de-
cided to remain in England over the
week-end, and, with the other trades
union leaders, address the strikers'
meetings Sunday. This sudden change
in plan is taken in some quarters as
indicating the possibility of a new
development.
In the meantime the country is
trying to carry on in as near a nor-
mal manner as possible. There have
l been disorders in London. esnecially

RI
1.
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1.
G

I
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
9

PO A
4 2
6 2
0 0
5 0
2 0
3 0
3 2
J 3
0 1
11
27 11

Totals ....

Tangen, 3b .
Donagan, If
Ellerman, 2b.
Larbon, cf .
Bur bridge, rf
Earnum, c ..
Murphy, lb .
Wiefand, ss .
Stoll, p .....

.... ...3G .
WisconsIm
AB
....... 4
4
4
4
4
4
4

.f
ti

3AHPO A
0 1 43
0 0 3 0
1 0 4 1
1 1 0 0
0 3 1 0
0 1 2 0
1 1 11 1
1 2 2 2
0 2 0 3
4 11 27 10

f

Totals ...........38
Score by innings:
Michigan..........00
Wisconsin..........11

1
L0

022 100--6
001 100-4

Summaries: Home runs-Wilson,'
Loos, Murphy. Two base hits-Wil-
son. Puckelwartz (2),Burbridge, Bar-
S nurn, Wieland. Sacrifice hits-.Kubi-
cek, Tangen. Bases on balls-Off
Jablonowski 2, Stoll 1. Struck out-
iablonowski 1, Walter 4, Stoll 2. Hit
by pitcher-Ellerman by Walter.
OureatherMan

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Ready For ArctiC Ford assumed the role of assistant fireIn Russian Flo
chief today and helped to stave off an
.__ brush fire that menaced the historic
(By Associated Press) 4 Wayside Inn, which he bought a few (By Associated Press)
OSLO, May 7.-A message to the years ago. The flames raced to with- MOSCOW, May 7.-Twenty-two pe
Ostenposten from Spitzbergen says the in half a mile of the inn and nearly sons have been drowned in floo
Amundsen-Ellsworth dirigible, Norge,' cost one life. caused by the overflowing of the V
arrived at King's Bay just in time to A heedlessly thrown cigarette was am river. Much damage has been do

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