100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGEDFOUJR

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY7, 1926

_.
5

-- w r

Published every morning except MoVAay
during the University year by the Bua in
Control of Student Publications.
' Iembers of Western Conference Editorial1
Association.,
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to. it or not otherwise
Credited ini this paper and the local news pub-1
lisbed therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
M~'ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier. $3.50; by mail,,
$4.00.
Offices: Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
ward Street.
Phones: Editorial,4 9z; ltalasess, 3:224.
11fTOKLAL BTAFF,
Telephone #
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. JPAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
News Editor........t...Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor..... ..Helen S. Ramsay
Spo t's Editor.............IJoseph Kruger
Tlegraph Editor.'...........William Walthour
Music an Dtama....,..Robert B. Henderson
' Night Editors
Smitb H Cs - NihLeonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykk4 -W. Lalvin Patterson
Assistaat City Editors
Iswin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude Bailey Ellis Merry
Charles 'Behymher Dorothy Morehouseo
George Berneike Margaret Parker
William Breyer Stanford N. Phelps
Philip C. Brooks Archie Robinson
Stratton Buck Simon Rosenbaum
(.arl Burger Wilton Simpson
Vdgar Carter Janet Sinclair
Joseph Chamberlain Courtland Smith
Carleton Champe Stanley Steinko
Douglas Doubleday Louis Tendler
Eugene H. Gutekunst Henry Thurnau
ames T. Herald David C. Vokes
Russell Hitt = Marion Wells
tvliles Kimball Cassam A. Wilson
F4arion Kubik Thomas C. Winter
Harriett Levy
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 31114
BUSINESS MANAGER
* YRON W. PARKER
Advertising............. ..Joseph J. Finn
Advertising.............. Rudolph BRotelman
Advertising..................Wm. L. Mullin
Advertising.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
1"irculatidon............. ..James R. DePuy
I'ublication..............Frank R. Dentz. Jr.
Accounts............:.......Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George)L. Annable, Jr. Frank Mosher
W. Carl Bauer 13. A. Norquist
John "1H. Bobrink, I.4leta G. Parker
Staile- S: Coddington David Perrot
W. J. Cox .Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Win. C. Pusch
Mary Flinterman 'Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert' Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
HaroldAHolmes Margaret Smith
Os.car A.. ose Sidney Wilson
FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1926
Night Editor-SMITH H. CADY, JR.

We are far behind the old country
i this respect; very few persons in
t is country know how to utilize their.
leisure. Even the persons who can
afford to do nothing seldom do it.
These persons either (lie of ennui, or
become incompetent through lack ofa
properly directed energy. They be-
come public nuisances, or else pile
tap a great deal of potential energy .
that theyacannever utilize to advan-
tage.
Surely they ought to be taught tol
use this spare time in something
which is at least interesting to them.
The person who employs his leisure
to master some form of connoisseur-
sl ip, to gain a special knowledge, an
appreciation of art, music, or letters;
to enrich his mind by familiarity with
beauty and what is best in this old
world, and lives so that his intelligent
leisure reacts upon society, is doing
as much good as the capitalist and the
"go-getter."
The best use of leisure is for some-
thing better than selfish interests, and
there is more and more opportunity
for int'ligent leisure in this country.
It is a happy thought that Mr. Speare
holds out to our prosperous people, a
means of attaining the useful employ-
ment of spare time.
Mussolini plans to reconstruct two
Roman galleys as part of his program
of reclaiming the glories of that an-
cient empire. But, at the same time,
he is building some more nodern
ships.

AND
NAVY
We have just thought of something
Which might make quite an anecdote.
The idea is lased on an absent minded
professor who, walking to class while
his car,.was .being repaired stops and
stands ..ftill whenever he comes to a
cross street. Just as it stands it isn't
much, but maybe someone could make
a good after dinner story out of it.
. *
ROLLS EXPEDITION TO ARCTIC IS
POSTiONED UNTIL 1932
SEASON%
TOO MUCH MONEY IS CAUSE
Ann Arijor, Mich., May 6.-(By B. P.'
O. E.)--The Rolls expedition to Ice-
land schedled to start off to fix up
things in general there will not leave
this year because so much money has
been collected by the speeches of
Prof. Jupiter C. Nobbs that all of it
wilnqt be spent before that time. So
many ships have been offered the
party that were all of them accepted
the fleet would mar all Atlantic traffic
for so long that it is thought best to
have some sort of elimination tryouts
before making the final choice.' Be-
cause of this and also because there
_has been so, much money contributed
that it will just all be spent, if special
.ew.equipinent is made from specially
;grown tres 'and specially raised ani-
nals, aftl this will take quite a time,
t-fe delay has been found unavoidable.
In the meantime, however, a small
party will go to Iceland this summer
in a row boat borrowed from the Bar-'
toil Hills golf club water hazard in
order to pave the way for the larger
expedition to follow. Prof. Nobbs
himself in person and not a false
beard will lead the party. This party
will make plans and maps and all
sorts of things which will be of prac-
tically no use to the larger party, but
wil give the professor lots to do and
say.
Further reports will appear as soon
as further events occur to warrant
them.
* * *
MILITARY *

AND
DRAMA

f
I
k
f
Iy

11 1 offl , , I I I

lddffllft
GRAHAMsS

TONIGHT: Two-Piano Recital
fhe High School auditorium at
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Mimes present f
Sgene O'Neill's "S. S. Glencairn" in t
Mimes theatre at 8:30 o'clock.
*j

in
En-
the

SENIORS

Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.

G 'RAIHAM S BOOK STORIES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

Now that
professor is

a University of Chicago
going to tour the Orient,

looking for the cradle of' the bed-
time stories, we can hope that the
supply will be cut off at its source.
In spite of the weather, we have
decided not to take-..our fur coat out
of storage. We haven't got one.
"Italy, a man's country, restricts
women's rights," says a news story.
(i. e., Mussolini isn't married.)
An Iowa farmer reports the birth
of a two-headed calf. We've seen
funnier calves on the campus.
Static Note: The Socialist party of
America is going to substitute the
radio for soapbox oratory.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. Theenames of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

"S. S. GLENCAIRN"
A review by William Lucas.
To say that "Glencairn" is the best
production the Mimes theatre has
housed this semester is appallingly,
inadequate. It it so refreshingly dif-
ferent-this cycle of three plays, ting-
ed with that pungent, healthy real-
ism that we have come to associate
with the author of Anna Christie. After
all, Engaged, Great Catherine, Why
Marry, et al, excellent productions, it
is true, were so manifestly of the
theatre, and after their facitious hu-
mor, their outrageous burlesque,
O'Neill is like a breath of fresh air-
good salt air, with the tang of the
sea. 4Was there ever a production
more abused than this? Perhaps, after
all is said and done, the S. C. A. may
reflect that he who laughs last laughs,
best.
"Glencairn" is so completely above
those smirking allusions to its sub-
ject matter, as if it were a risque
French farce, a morsel stinking of the
garbage can-; it is poignant, moving
drama, played with a sympathy and
understanding, that puts to shame
these "all-campus" casts we have
been worshipping of late. The cast;j
that is the chief revelation. We are,
or should be, aware of the power of
an O'Neill play, but by who else than
the devoted band at the Provincetown
should we expect them so effectively
done? The players are for the most
part, raw material; that is the sur-
prising thing and perhaps that very
fact contributes to their success.
Those who show the results of ex-
perience havebeen spared the spot-
light of publicity, and they manage to
lose themselves in the performance
with that spontaneity which is the
glory of the amateur theatre at its
best.
"The loon of the Caribees" is per-
haps less effective than its successors,
"Bound East for Cardiff," and "In the
Zone." It servesthowever as an ad-
mirable prelude to the poignancy of
the drama which follows. The death
scene in "Bound East For Cardiff" is"
one not soon forgotten. It is played
by Lorain Norton and Donald Lyons-
and there can be no more said than
this-they lived their parts, and an
audience, not overly responsive at
first, lived with them. But first men-
tion must go to Richard Woellhal in
the role of. Smitty. He proved himselt
an actor of first rate ability, and his
sympathetic interpretation of the
heart sick Smitty deserves to rank
among the three or four truly fine
characterizations made known in the
Mimes theatre this year. And best of
all he doesn't seem to know it.
Carl Nesson, Richard Lutes, and
Abraham Sachs did exceptionally well
in character roles, the latter extract-
ing a wealth of humor from not over-
ly auspicious lines. It is doubtful,
however, whether one is apt to think
as much of the players as the parts
they have created. The directors have
evidently allowed a good deal of in-
dividual initiative in the character
roles.

AUTO PARTS
For All Makes of Cars.
TIRES FOR SALE.
JUNK CARS BOUGHT
PHONE 3935.
KESSLER BROS., Canal Street
;MAKE 7 ELL
MAN N'S c
"S A LE
OF FELT HATS."
We are closing out all of our
SPRING HATS
at Reduced Prices.
No Better Hats Made.
j . We clean and block hats.
High class work only.
FACTORY rHAT STORE
b17 Packard StreeL Phone 7415.

Walk-Over

e

$7P5o

A new Sport Oxford in Nude
Calf, trimnwd with white stitch-
ing. Leather sole and heel.

.

IrvingWarmoltsD S.C Big Cashol lobthes
CHIROPODIST AND SS EXTRA MONEY FOR LARGE SIZES SS
ORTHIOPEDIST $1 Extra for Suits Brought o the StO.
707 N. University Ave. Phone 212 D. MOUCHKY ?AoL N5~

P LE ASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

I
I
I
I
i
:

The freedom youth craves
is in these new sport shoes
Youth's scanty, clinging clothes are cut to fit and
free, not hide, the feminine form. Frank youth
reveals a grace more vivid than the world has ever
seen before. - No wonder modern youthful girls
turn to Walk-Over sport "shoes. Here, in the ex-
elusive pear-shaped heel and personal fit of com-
bination ineasurements, is foot-freeing fit that only
Walk-Over shoes can give.
Walk-OverBoot Shop
115 South Main St.
!'T FE

. egistration for the campus
elections next week will be con-
cided today. Men and women
Wo have any faith in the future
of student government, who have
any desire to see truly representa-
tive persons holding campus ofdi-
ces and repr'esenting the student
body before the world outside,
will register today that they may
vot next week.
"AMERICAN" LABOR
One 'of the aspects of the English
general strike which has not been
dealt with so far is the effect it has
had on labor in our own country. In
the eyes of the radical laborer, what-
ever his nationality, this is the time
for him to declare his rights, to makeI
from an already large strike a world
wide declaration of the intent of la-
bor to govern the earth.
Pledges from. trades unions all over'
the world, except America, have beenj
received in England, supporting the
strikers. German laborers refuse to
let coal be transported to England,
French unions pledge their moral
support, Italian tradesmen give aid,
and Russia is heartily in sympathy
with the movement.
The American Federation of LaborI
makes no statement whatsoever of itsI
views. This speaks well for our
American unions, though there is no
reason why labor in this country should
be dissatisfied. The two things which
are directly responsible for the good
condition of our workmen are modern-
ization of machinery and quantity of
Tiower. England and -the other for-
eign nations have neither of these on
any large scale. For every worRman
in United States, there is a force of
three horse power used in manufac-
turing.
Due to this difference in quality of
labor between other countries and
our own, and to the fact that our
trades unions give no support to such
an undertaking -as the English work-
men have adopted, there is reason to
belleve, or at lea.st hope, that capital
and labor in Ainerica are at last coin-
ing to an understanding of mutual re-
spect.
HOW TO LOAF
' President Speare, of Northeastern
university, has discovered a newl
branch of instruction for colleges

CHINESE PATRIOTISM1
To the Editor:
Sir Frederic Whyte. said yesterday
in his talk on "The Political Awaken-
ing in. Asia" that the democratic gov-
ernment in China is a failure and that
the Chinese people lack patriotism. I
am not a student in political science,
so I do not pretend to be able to pro-
duce facts and proofs why we do not
agree with him and why we think we
have patriotism. But I wish to refer
to one insance as an evidence that
we do not need to "accquire patriot-
ism" as Sir Frederic declared.
The spirit we showed in boycotts
Sir Frederic already mentioned and
I am not to speak about again. What
I would like to call the attention to
is the general strike in Shanghai after
the "May 30 Incident" last year. When
the Chamber of Commerce voted to'
join the workers in the strike, it was
not for higher wage and shorter hours,
nor for any other indirect benefit. On
the other hand, those experienced
business men well realized it meantl
a tremendous loss to their respective
business. Then what led them to de-
liberately make such a big sacrifice?
They were called upon to stand for a
national cause and they answered it.
This I call patriotism.
Sir Frederic described well the
revolution in China by saying, "Liter-
ally over night, the Manchu Monarchy
fell and the republic was set up."
But he went on and, without giving
the causes for the present situation,
he concluded "the democratic govern-
ment is a failure." I have no doubt
that Sir Frederic, being a student in
the politics in Asia, fully understandsI
the complicated condition in China to-
day, such as the effects of the military
and diplomatic defeats since 1340, and
the direct and indirect support of the
powers from the different generals at
present. All these have their due
share in delaying our attempt to put
our house in order.
But even if we (1o admit that in
what we could do from our part with
the democratic government, we have
disappointed the westerners is thel
period of fifteen years rather short for
the immense task of evolution from an
ancient and vast empire to a modern
republic? This slow process was not
completed, but merely started on Jan-
uary 1, 1912, and has been going on
ever since.
If the progressive changing west

The suggestion has come that
scholarship is a military activity, and
the speaker carried out the figure ad-
miably. But the point could be car-
ried a little further. This idea of sol-
diers marching around the campus
interests us.
Of course the faculty would be
graded in the regular army style,
stuztin4 with sergeant and working
up'to Pr.Pesident Little as Commander-
in-chief of the Ann Arbor expedition-
ary force. This would provide a lot
more ranks than the present system,
and so there could be a lot of distinc-
tions drawn.
Classes would be called by the
bugle, and dismissed by the same
method, the improvement being obvi-
ous-classes could not be held over-
time, or else the general of that de-
partment would court-martial the in-
structor-beg pardon-officer.
Thenthere wouldbe less A. W. O.L.
on the part of the students and in-
structors both. Such action would
bring a day or so in the guard-house-
which would be Tappan hall
Although some of the professors
might 'object to the military uniform,
still if they think they can pass in
knickers they ought to be able to
stand the nattier costume,
, Taking the place of the Spring
ganes and other inter-class activities,
there would be sham battles, the uni-
versityibeing divided into two armies
accordijg to schools, the Lits and
Laws against the Engineers and
Dents. The Medics would be neutral,
serving. as the Red Cross. -
In place of track meets with other
colleges, there would be field days,
with competition in drilling.
Rlather than football, there would be
picked regiments to battle with other
universitie's, using blanks in their
guns whenever possible.
But the worst of it as we see it is
that anything said in ROLLS could be
made the subject of a court-martial,
and this idea of standing before a
firing-squad isn't pleasant.
And if you didn't do an assignment
for some class, the officer could make
you stand at attention for the rest
of the hour, or something like that.
At rest!
--Timothy Hay.
* * *
- FIRST ENTRYN!! -
Dear Mr. Sir Toby Tiffin:
Enter me in the S. A. contest that
was announced in ROLLS early last
I week. I think it is the finest thing
that you could have started. I'm sure
that I can easily capture first prize.
The girls insist on following me
everywhere I go...tish..tish. My pho-
tograph will reach you in the next de-
ivtry of the mail.
Bashfully yours,

3
r
t
I
i
)
i
v
I
i
a
i
ti
L)
t
i
>,
,
,,
I
i

I
}

.-.. ~ > -

I1

d I

~1

~I %.

P
rfgy
I
is
5
Z

6I

F-'"

aPTo I

I

,tQ,
h
O

'j

r
.
n
1

I

.

Ai

" gAf't
* ', , Y b~
' i . 41
*~ ' 5, ~
, S. t
S , j

i_; .
s
,
, "''

Giovani Iartineli
The fourth concert of the annual
May Festival on Friday evening will
be given by Giovanni Martinelli, tenor,
of the Metropolitan Opera company.
* * *
TRlE TWO-PIANO RECITAL
Miss Davies and Miss Hauser, pian-
ists, two advanced students of Guy
Maier of the University School of Mu-
sic, will present the following pro-
gram this evening in the Ann Arbor
High School auditorium at eight
o'clock:
Gavotte and Musette........... Raff
Six Love Waltzes......Brahms-Maier
Danse Macabre .........Saint-Sains
Miss Davies and Miss Hauser
Sonata: in G minor.........Schumann
Miss Davies
Prelude and Fugue in B flat
minor..................Bach

,,:.
+ , ,

refinement

An added betterment is the reason for
Lucky Strike popularity. Distinctive
flavor comes from 45 minutes of toasting
- this added process develops the hid-
den flavors of the world's finest tobaccos.
MoofC

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan