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May 06, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-06

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]PACE POUJR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSIDAY, M AY 6, 1 -26

,- : I I llllllllllllm

Published every ,morning except Monray
luring the University year by the 15ao In
r. Control of Student Publications.

I

Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-I
titled to the use for republication of all newsa
dispatches credited to it or not otherwiseC
credited i. this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor.
Michigan, astsecond class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
naster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building; May-
mard Street.
Phones: EditorIal. 492%; bnslae, N1214.
P1WOIg0AL BTAFa
. elepbone 4928
MA14AGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIB
Chairman, Editorial Board.... Norman R. Thal
~News Editor ...........Mh'anning Housewortb
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor........... """.oseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Wathour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Ca'iy Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykki W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
;twin Olian Frderick H. Shillito
Assistants

Such meets are by no means with-
out precedent, since Yale and HarvardfetOASTEDROLL
for anmrofyears mtCambridge I
and Oxford in track events, and///
Princeton and Cornell have arranged THE
for a series with the two English GENERAL
schools. STRIKE
In another field, Michigan has had
ample proof of the value of meetings
our English brothers-the interna- having gone on general strike in sym
pathy with the poor workmen c
tional debates. Besides the better un- ameri hothe tooworkwenthe
dertaningofeac otergaied n. America who have to work while thei
derstanding of each other gained inm nEgadgtaltee(a
these encounters, there has come a brother in England get all these day
off, this issue can only be 'put on

MUSIC
DRAMA

r d

a
nt
n-
of
sir j

IL.

TONIGHT: The Mimes present Eu-
gene O'Neill's "S. S. Glencairn" in the
jMimes theatre at 8: 30 o'clock.
, * *

40ENIORS

Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.

ys
ut

I

C AAI

nwstyl of b ~ting, con ras ing
greatly with the accepted methods
here.
Perhaps our track team would not
be introduced to new technique, but
at any rate it would bring about a
closer union between the Old schools
and the New.

because the various members have
agreed to write on the strike which1
they are maintaining. They claim
that by doing this they are not break-t
ing the strike.
We must admit we fail to see their
point of view, but nevertheless we i
have to give in, so this will be the1
official strike issue.

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
William Breyer
Vbilip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Carleton Cham pe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
James T.. Herald
usllHitt
Miles Kimball
Marion Kubik
Hlarriett Levy

Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Yokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

TO GREENLAND-IN 1927 * * *
Friends of Prof. William Herbert
. a IWhat we would like to know about'
Hobbs read with regret in yesterday's this general strike is just what hap-
Daily of the postponement of his main - gnrlsrk sjs htepdto oGenad ceue o pn e h aepstosuo
Spens men who have positions upon
epledthi re ,b wededmoewhich a whole city or country is de-
than gratified t mer, but were more pendant. What do the men working
l rin Electric power and light plants do?
further that a preliminary trip will Men working in the hospitals? We
be made during June and July to haven't been able to learn whether or
make certain of the success of the ex- .thengts t nigh indonear
pedition next year. not the lights at night in London are
pdonexyt ear. ason or off, or whether laboring men in
Undoubtedly it was a severe disap- hosptials etc quit or not, but it must
pointment to Professor Hobbs that be a very complicated situation, For
the main expedition had to be post- instance if all the wardens in the
poned,but the scientificdata obtain- pr struck te ro e would
ed in the preliminary trip will com- rsn tukth rsnr ol
p enatein omemeaureforthede-either escape or starve to death. May-
pensate in some measure for the de- ealtsemnd no cm n-
lay of the main one. Two months will be all these men do not come un-
be spent in Greenland this summer ler the head of organized labor. At
investigating certain geological prob- any rate we hope not.-
lems, and the trip will have an im- POSSIBILITIES OF THE BRITISH
portant bearing upon the matter of STRIKE
procedure for next year. Five million people in Great Brit-
The assurance by Professor Hobbs ain are on strike. If, as in the case
that arrangements will be continued of Passaic, New Jersey, the same num-
for the main expedition in 1927, and bers are used to quell the laborers,
that the expedition will definitely take there would be a good deal of trouble
place, makes the outlook for the fu- when the two contending parties start
ture brighter. Professor Hobbs has fighting. Because, you see, Great
given much to the University, and it Britain is rather a small country, and
is fortunate that his project is merely a good deal of the space is taken up
postponed, and not abandoned, for with factories, Oxford and Cambridge,
lack of funds Westminster Abbey, and cricket fields.
Where will the fighters congregate to

i

"S. S. GLENCAIRN"
A review, by Theodore Hornberger. G
It all began with the music. The
Man in the Row Behind, authority for;
the time being on the drama, football,
and related subjects, announced di-
rectly that it was weird. Of course he
had to make conversation and he went O
on to remark in the fast-falling black-
ness which went several degress
blacker than one would think possible
that it, the music, was something of a
cross between a bagpipe and a guitar.j
Anyway it was decidedly the righty
music for "The Moon of the Caribees"
with its kaleidescopic mixture of rumY
and moonlight and song and nigger No uncertainty
women. six to twelve t
The audience hoped to be shocked,
in fact it had been promised some- of other males
thing in the handbills-"throbbing
realism, raw and fresh." If it came
to be shocked most of it stayed to be _
thrilled into tenseness and embarras-
sed swallows by a series of plays 1
which possessed more power than ".
anything Mimes has produced this
i year. Eugene O'Neill can claim most
of the credit for "S. S. Glencairn"-
its quick change effect of comedy and
tragedy and always unescapable real- Mm.'
!ANN S c
O F F E LT H AT S
:'We are closing out all of our
SPRING HATS
at Reduced Prices.
No Better Hats Made.
We clean and block hats.
high class work only.

willwant one for your finals.

No

HAM'S BOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

SKILLED REPAIRING

about a Masterpen. It writes at touch-h(
times as much ink, and will outwear sever ; p

l,

┬░ai;n;I_' c.!]'z. iYi; i, mot.

olds
ens
9

24 HOUR SERVICE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
ORGANIZED 1863
I

BUSINESS STAFf
Telephone 1214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising..........-.. Joseph J. Plan
Advertising.............,Rud h Bottelman
Advertising................ L. Mullin
Advertising.........-Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation.............James R. DePuy
blication........-..-Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts......... -.. ....Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

E
t
t
,

Savings

Department

Trust Department
Oldest National Bank in Michigan

George H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Bauer
John H. Bobrink
Stanley S. Coddington
XVTJ. J. Cox
Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Have1
Harold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wn. C. Pusch
Nance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wn. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson____

An Illinois society has printed, onI
paper cups, pleas to save the wild
flowers, the idea being to distribute
them at the springs and wells. Butl
the response is most likely to be
"You're All Wet."
Vanderbilt, Jr., is to sell one of his
newspapers in order to make money
to keep the rest going. Even a Van-
derbilt can't keep up with the cost of
newspaper financing.

do battle?
It is indeed a problem. Ten mil-
lion scrappers -and no place for them
to scrap. The safest way, it seems to
us, is to arbitrate thus: Let the lead-
ers get together and agree in an
amicable way that the same number
shall be bumped off on each side. This
is a rather sanguinary way of settling
things, but after all, it will cause con-
siderably less loss of property. But
will it settle anything?
. * * IFNIF.
Lament

rl

917 Packard Street. Phone 7415.

4
',A

THUVRSDAY, MAY 6, 1926
Might Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
"President Wilson was betrayed
by Colonel House, who was pri-
marily responsible for the down-
fall of the war president's ideals ;
and hopes after the Paris confer-
ence and was the evil genius of
the late president. Secretary of
State Lansing also aided in nulli-
fying the acts of Mr. Wilson.
When the President returned to
America both D ouse and Lansing
got together with1 Clemenceau and
Balfour, the most reactionary
statesmen in England, and this
little group then undid all the
brilliant work of the previous
session and framed the ground-
word of the Versailles treaty,
which was passed on the old idea
of a separate military settlement,
according to the dictates of Mar-
shal Foch."-Stanton Coit of Lon-
don before the Ethical Culture
Society of Philadelphia.
REGISTER
President Coolidge, speaking be-
fore the Daughters of the American
Rtevolution, declared that the ballot
box is the heart of a democratic gov-
ernment and that American laxity at
the polls would lead to the dest'ruc-
tion of such a governing system. To-
day and tomorrow the Student council
will hold registration days in prepar-
.tion for the campus elections- the
forerunner and trainig-school for the
national elections.
Habits formed in college should in-
fluence the actions of the future citi-
Yen, and if the future citizen must
vote to perpetuate democratic govern-
anent, the college man should .vote
today. The less desirable factions
and political combines on the campus'
will see to it that their members are
registered, but their influence will be
small if the mass of students prepare;
1o vota for qandidates who have earn-
1'd positions. Lack of interest in stu-
dent government leads to poor gov-
ernment, and reflects back directly on
those who have neglected to fulfill
their obligations at the polls.
Students who have not registered
will not be allowed to vote. Every
Michigan man-and woman-should
have his or her name on the list of
those eligible to cast a ballot on
'May 12.

EDITORIAL COMMENT

I can buy 'em sodas,
and Sundaes,
LABOR'S SELF-EMANCIPATION and Pop
(The Christian Science Monitor) But when it comes to Powd
It may be taken as an established There is where I stop.
fact that nothing has contributed so Cost a Dollar Fifty,
much to the emancipation of the wage Made out of Tin, and Zinc
earner in America as education. De- Nothing but some perfumed
spite this, there have been indications is inside, I think,
that even some of the more ardent I never even look inside,
champions of unionism and the de- Though Mamie gloats, and h
fenders of aggression in enforcing the But all it does for me is get
demands of organized labor sometimes On my coats and collars-
fail to recognize the actual means I can buy 'em sodas,
which have contributed most to La- and Sundaes,
bor's advance from a condition ap- and Pop
proaching servitude to one of indus- But when it comes to Powder
trial and social equality. Looking There is where I stop.
backward it is possible, if conditions;
are surveyed and analyzed without * * *
prejudice, to trace the influence of the THE GREAT STRIKE
schools and colleges in establishing ANN ARBOR, Mich., May
this better status. Arbor today is in the thro
In the course of an educational con- great strike, probably the gi
ference in Wisconsin, recently, called all history. Last night at
by the State Federation of Labor, Dr. the Student Council called a
Glenn Frank, president of Wisconsin strike" on all schools, ins
University, emphasized the import- with the striking Lawyers. T
ance of realizing the need of pursuing tation is at a standstill s
the search for an education 'even be- Transportation Workers Un
yond the schools. This advice is of joined in the walkout.
peculiar value to those who are com- The lawyers are holding ou
pelled by circumstances to go imme- I the faculty of that school, de
diately from the primary or grade I a better building. The facu
schools into the mills or shops. But that the administration sho
the matter of chief significance dis- vide a subsidy for that purpo
cussed was that of enlisting the work- ever the administration says
ers in the campaign to stamp out present state of economic c
illiteracy in the United States. Labor in the university makes it ir
indicates its readiness to volunteer to do this.
in this service. Its leaders, 'realizing IJPresident Little warnedf
the benefits which have come to the ulace to be calm and to co-o
masses through education, declare every way possible. He den
their determination to see that the the Soviet was suspected of
hope of making the United States "100 the strike.
per cent literate by 1930," is realized. Delegates from all the sch
It is to be the special effort of the at the Union yesterday and v
Wisconsin Federation of Labor to I powers to the Student Counc
bring education within the reach of thereby becomes the represen
all, and especially to advance adult student opinion.
education. The need was emphasized Great suffering and muc
of helping "more persons to find the resulted from the action of t
sphere of activity for which they are which suspended publication
best suited." I pathy with the movement.
It is in such a manifestation as stormed the newspaper's o
this that there is seen the confident hours, pleading for their dai
assurance of the permanency and of news, humor, feeling absol
staiblity of American ideals. While I able to begin the day withou
it is realized that education alone read ROLLS.
does not constitute character, it is Chimes appeared on the
undeniable that literacy is an aid in for the first time- with n

er-boxes,
chalk,
hollers,j
Boxes,
W. E.
E
5.-Ann
oes of aa
reatest in
midnightj
"general
sympathyI
Transpor-
ince the
pion also
ut against
emanding;
ulty hold
Duld pro-
se. How- f
that the
onditions
mpossible
the pop-
perate in
nied that
starting
ools met
voted full
il, which
ntative of
h rioting
he Daily,
in sym-
Crowds
office for
ly ration
utely un-
ut having
streets-
ews, the

E. lortilner Shuter
E. Mortimer Shuter, who is direct-
ing the production of "S. S. Glencairn."
ity in which he has somehow injected
more romance than the giddiest mu-
sical comedy ever achieves. But one
wonders a deal about this cast, pro-
claimed as real bruisers picked out
from Phi Beta Kappa and the Daily
and a few other places, announced as
types not actors, supposed to be pick-
ed up almost from the streets.
If Mimes and Mr. Shuter can pick
up this sort of stuff from the street
they should go into the business per-
manently. These fellows had some-
thing that no other cast has had this
year, a facile, inevitable way of slip-
ping into their parts and being valu-l
able if only as a background. They
had everything the play gave them;
unforced song good enough to be pro-
longed, which is unusual in campus
theatre, several effective fights, friend-
ly of course and only for entertain-
ment but mighty good entertainment,;
sailor drunkenness without seeming,
effort, mob scenes without loss of
realism, and each following the other
without a break.
Ordinarily that would have been
enough. But ' to show that theyI
weren't lost when separated they went
on to show "Bound East for Cardiff"
with its extenuated tragedy and shook
all that was in it out until the end
was almost a physical effort in the
audience. And the surprising thing is
that the men who carried the whole
thing were new; Lorain Norton as'
"Yank," Donald Lyons as "Driscoll,"
Abraham Sachs, Richard Woellhaf,
Leonard Hall. Where did Mimes find
them-still on the street.
So much for superlatives. The first
play is shocking enough to satisfy the
promises of the advertising, it finds
one or two gaps. But on the whole
the laughs come where they should,
there isn't much to blush about even
if blushes could be seen. The second
play has more than enough of the
other sort of thing to satisfy the most
rabid uplifter of campus morals. The
contrast is striking.
"S. S. Glencairn" is unusual in thatj
it has somehow escaped the polite
polished sort of thing that is so often
evident in campus dramatics.
* * *
THE MAY FESTIVAL-VI.
SIXTH CONCERT-Saturday, May
22, at eight o'clock.
SOLOISTS
Florence Austral, Soprano ......ElsaG
August Lenska, Mezzo-Soprano..
...... ... . Ortrud

PLEASE
DON'T
MAK E
ON T HE

-a
OING to th
same thing
comes monotonc
Step away froi
mer-experience
exotic joy of vi
different people
scenery.
Think of goin
a CUNARDER
'irie for furtlhcr par
CUV'NARD & ANOHO
1211 Wash. Blvd. D
or Local Agent

,~,~-~,~-~~~

I h
iC
e same places and doing the
;s vacation after vacation be-
auS.
m the commonplace this sum-
the thrill of adventure, the
siting another world with its
different customs, different
g to Europe and returning on
at the low cost of
ticulars to
R LINES R u d rp
etroit Round Trip
S TOURIST THIRD CABIN

TA S TY
TOASTED
Sandwiches

709 North University
Near Arcade Theatre

on
VACM

"Watclh Ann Arbor Grow!"
FRATERNITIES-SORORITIES

RESIDENCES AND
ROOMING HOUSES

An attractive house, in a setting of beautiful
trees and shrubbery. Recently decorated. Two
baths, sleeping porch, library. Price around
$30,000. Very good terms.
1706 CAMBRIDGE ROAD
Eleven rooms, four fireplaces, large lot, finest
location for Fraterniy or Sorority now avail-
able. Price $30,000. Terms.
1000 EAST ANN ST.
Fifteen rooms, lot 60x132, steam heat, tiled
baths and showers, room for 28. Price $21.000.

4 1601 GRANGER AVE.
Six room bungalow, sleeping porch, water soft-
ener, screens, awnings, garage. Priced right.
EAST OF CAMPUS
Seven room house, stucco, all modern, tlied bath,
den, large fireplace, hot water heat, water lift,
lot 66x200, two-car garage. Price $16,500. Terms.
ROOMING HOUSES
Thirteen rooms, near hospital and campus, oak
floors, fireplace, large income. $12,500. $1,000
down.
Eight rooms, near campus, all modern, bringing
inmo of8 ner month and housing small

i

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