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May 05, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-05

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PAGE F'OU~R

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1926

a i
Published every morning except Mowuay
during the Univ it year by the Boar In
Control of Student Publxcations.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled tothe use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lisped therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
tichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Fost-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.4; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: EditorIal, 4s5; Lssfnes, st24.
5DITOEIA STAI
7lephone 4921
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Cbairman, Editorial Board... .NormanR Thal
News Editor ..........Manning Iousewortb
Women's Editor............ Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor .............. Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor..........William Wathour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith' H. Cs"iy Leonard C. Hall +
Thomas V Koykk W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
William Breyer
Vilip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gtitekunst
James T. Herald
Russell Hitt
Miles Kimball
Nfarion Kubik
Harriett Levy

Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
1ouis Tendler
Henr Thurnau
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

is surprising that publications of the
middle west have not fallen into step
and made an attempt to combat the
ever-increasing crime tendency in the
same way. Chicago, Detroit, and
other mid-wester-n cities have a higher
percentage of crime for the size of.,
their populations than any other cities
of the country, and yet their news-
papers, the great thought-molders,{
continue to publish only stories ofI
crime and criminals. Little or no
publicity is given to the majority of!
convictions and sentences, and the
underworld continues to think itself
safe from punishment.
Unless people realize that the teeth
of the law will close on them when
they offend the laws, unless they are
brought to a realization that there is
a certain rule of retribution in so-
ciety, crime can never be reduced.
Newspapers can and should assist in
bringing this knowledge to the poten-
tial criminal; they can be one of the
greatest single factors in combating
disregard for the law.
ASSOCIATED PENS, INC.
The bringing together of the jour-
nalists of the world in a union for
their intellectual, physical, and pleas-
urable profit is the aim of the foun-
ders of Press City, ex-Congressman
and Mrs. Charles D. Haines, of Alta-
monte Springs, Florida. The city is
to be built, according to the plan, on
a 1,000 acre tract of land in Florida
given by the couple, and will not only
be a home for the indigent, a hospital
for the sick, and a sanitarium for the
jaded members of the press, but will
also be a center for journalistic en-
terprise for the whole world.
If plans are carried out, every state
in the union and every nation in the
world will have buildings there. Out
of this city should come a strong,
concerted brotherhood that will have
great power in destroying racial and
national misunderstandings, the ig-
norance of "the other half of the
world," which often leads to wars. A
central body of journalists will mould
and wield in the right fashion the
greatest power on earth - Public
Opinion.
Working separately, the various
presses of the world have been so
powerful that they have influenced the
growth of nations, have caused and
prevented wars, and are continually
changing the aspect of civilization.
And now they have an opportunity to
work together. Cooperation and world
peace will result when all the nations
understand each other, and this
knowledge will best be distributed by
the press; therein lies the place, of
Associated Pens, Inc.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

PRACTICALLY
FREE
s SPEECH
We hereby offer our services at a
nominal fee, to any local politicians
who are starting their campaigns, and
for various quite easily imagined rea-
sons, find themselves unable to write,
their own speeches. We will gladly
offer them the correct remarks for
any occasion; all they have to do is
be able to read.
We have prepared in advance sev-
eral timely and witty after dinner ad-
dresses, formal political speeches, and
countless campaign slogans and
planks, boards, and whole platform.
Any and all of these may be had for
a rediculously small fee by applying
at this office.
We have, for instance, one address
entitled "The Importance of Local
Politics" this of course, is of a rather
humorous nature. Another is called
"What Is Wrong with This Campus"
and is very penetrating, although we
fear it is too long for average use.
"What the Student Body Wants" is
the name of another of our products.
This is of the after dinner variety,
and deals with nothing in particular
in a light and frothy way. The prize
s peech along this vein however, is
"What I Will Do if Elected" people
to whom I have read this seem unani-
mous in declaring it 'a perfect
scream.'
A few of them require a few simple
props, such as a small Michigan pen-
nant, to be waved at the psychological
moment. The talk in which this is
used is not yet completed, but it is
developing nicely. We think it will
be called, "Hurrah for the Yellow and
Blue" and we can promise that it will
be stirring to the core. A few more
samples of titles for the humorous re-
marks are: "Reforming the Union,"
"The Power of the Council" and "The
Michigan Spirit."
* * *
TIIANI{SGIVING
(Upon completing the study of Identi-
cal twins. See Heredity)
I
Thank God I am not born identical
twins
Thank Heavens there's not two of us
My friends and relations have suffered
chagrins
I've at least spared them double the
fuss.
II

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA

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E
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THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ Ie-
cital by G. Calvin Ringgenberg in hill
Auditorium, at 4:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT: Eugene O'Neill's "S. S.
Glencairn," in the Mimes Theater, at
8:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Students Recital,
In the School of Music Auditorium, at
8 o'clock.
* * *

I

SE ORS

Consult Us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.

AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising........ ......Joseph J. Finn
Advertising .............Rudolph BRotelman
Advertising.......... .....Wmn. L. Mullin
Advertising.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation.............. .,James R. DePuy
Publication............Frank R. entz, Jr
Accounts.. ...............Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

George H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Bauer
John H1. Bobrink
Sanley S. Coddington
W. J. Cox
Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Havet
harold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Park
I avid Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wi.eC. Pusch
Dance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wm. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

3

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
SCHiOLASTIU EXCELLENCE
For an hour today the University
will pause to do honor to scholastic
eexcellence.

J

AM'S

As it pauses thus, to pay some
slight tribute to approximately 300
students, it will appear in a garb dif-
ferent from that in which it is some-
tit;es clothed by the community of the
outside world. Scholarship will oc-
cupy the position of honor, and in its
name the 300 have been summoned.
Their's will be the seats of honor.
The 300 to whom the student com-
munity will bend its knee, fall into
three divisions, the first, represent-
ing the student group ranking in the
upper ten per cent of the various
senior classes, the second, including
those who have been awarded scholar-
ships and fellowships, and the third,
those who have received various
awards which are conferred primarily
* on a basis of excellence in scholar-
ship, and those who have represented
the University in activities distinctly
intellectual.
It was the desire, of Marion L. Bur-
ton, Michigan's fifth President, to give
to academic excellence some fair
measure of public recognition that
led to the first Honors convocation. It
was his wish that such public mert=
S iings should be an annual event of the
school year; that one day should reg-
ularly be set aside when emphasis
S might be given to the work of those
who distinguish themselves in intel-
lectual pursuits. Today, on the morn
of the third meeting of which Dr. Bur-
ton was the inspiration, the Honors
convocation plan occupies in the eyes
of the campus a position which is
likely to insure its continuance down
' through the years, as the University's
late leader wished.
Fundamentally, the Honors convo-
cation plan is sound. It rests upon
the assumption that an institution of
higher learning should pay tribute to
those who cover themselves with
honor in the field for which the insti-
tution primarily exists. And in a,
measure, so far as a university does
this, it approaches that ideal standard,
characterized by Mark Hopkins and
t Is log.

THE TROUBLE IN BRITAIN
To the Editor:
I should like to clear up a point
stated in the news columns of yester-.
day's Daily on the present state of af-'
fairs in :Britain, as I believe misun-
derstanding on this situation should
not exist at the present moment in
any country. I refer to the bone of
contention in the present strike.
You quote Mr. A. J. Cook, Trades-
Union leader, as refusing to give way
to the government's demands: "The
government right up to the last has
taken the side of the owners, and has
interpreted the royal commission's re-
port to mean an immediate reduction
of wages for the miners. That we
have refused to accept and will con-!
tinue to refuse to accept by the help
of the whole trades union move-1
Ient."
It is necessary to say that this is a
deliberately one-sided statement. It
ignores the alternative government
offer, namely, to keep the wages
status quo o condition that the min-
ers' working day be extended from
six to seven hours. This is essential
if the owners are to make the mining
industry profitable, as up to the pres-
ent it has been worked at a loss in al-
most every case.
One would not object to the princi-
ple of paying the maximum wages
possible if the Workers would fulfill
their side of the bargain, giving as
their share at least an averagej
amount of energetic work. But at
present, the worker's trade union for-
bids a man to work five minutes over
his scheduled six hours even if he
wishes to do so in order to make ex-
tra money on his own. And even
within those six hours, the men do not
put their heart into their work. It
amounts to this: the men are paid to:
work and therefore make a showing
of doing so, but do not exert them-I
selves beyond the necessary amount.
The status of the British workmanf
is not deplorable. He has short lioursI
and high wages; the majority of the{
miners are earning more than the
teachers and school directors who{
give their children free education.I
tT T p o fl ( e111 flfl C t V toUinnnv i 'ndi

Thus far from my life I've derived
bits of fun
A wee nitche I have found to con-
tain-
But the place is so tiny there's room
for but one
Were I plural, I could scarce that
maintain.
III
My mind is no giant of power and
strength,
Although thus far it has served me
'tis true
Mayhap it will last me through life's
weary length
But God knows it would not do for
two.
* * *
"DUMB BENNIE"
BlNNIE: Calling his father on the
telephone. The old gentleman is
ha-rd of hearing.) Hello, papa. This
is Bennie talking.
FATHER: Bennie ain't home.
Bennie: Papa, this is Bennie on the
phoie.
Father; No Bennie ain't home.
Bennie: This is Bennie speaking, pa.
Father: No I don't know where he
went. He went out.
Bennie: Pa this is your son Bennie. I
want to tell you that I won't be
home for supper.
Father: Ailright, I'll tell him when
he comes in. Good bye.
NICK.
* * *
"Thaliit isn't gneiss at all," remark-
ed the geology professor as he stoop-
ed to pick up the dock hurled at him
by the student in the back seat.
-Emmell.
* * *
Gaston: Qui etait cette demoiselle
qui vous accompagnait hier soir?
Raoul: Elle n'etait pas une demoi-
selle; c'etait ma femme.
-La Vie Parisienne.
* * *
Above is a little bon mot in the
original- language. It is so typicallyj
Frenih however, that we fear that
even if you did finally get it all trans-
lated you wouldn't make much out of
it.
* * *.
No, this is not meant to be an ex-
ample of typical French life. We are
not as serious as some seem to con-
sider the Gargoyle.
Sir Toby Tiffin.
helping to share the burden which is
on the shoulders of every member of

THE STUDENTS' RECITAL
Eunice Northrup, contralto, assisted
by Thelma Lewis, soprano, will pre-
sent the following program this even-
ing in the School of Music Audi-
torium:
Ah mio cor ..................Handel
Chi vuol la zinorella........ Paislello
Gotine Gialle ................Sibella
The Isle .......................
God Took from Me Mine All......
In the Silence of Night..Rachmaninoff
Chanson Triste ............. Duparc
Les trois Prieres ...........Falsdilhe
Lied Maritime ...............d'Indy
The Forest of Oaks......MacFayden
Jackie.................Mortelmans
In the Wood of Finvara.....Burleigh
Take Joy Home ............ Bassett
Duet from "Madame Butterfly"...
. ....................... Puccini
Miss Lewis and Miss Northrup
* * *
WILLIAM FAVERSHAM, ,AND THE
GRANDi MANNER
A review, by William Lucas.
The ways of the theater are deviosu
and strange-William Faversham as
"guest-artist" at the Bonstelle Play-
house in that ever fanciful vehicle of
his "The Squaw Man." It is a long
time since Mr. Faversham first made
known of the volatile Jim Carson, yet
the passage of years seem not to have
dulled his characterization. This
actor is much of an artist in his limit-
ed sphere. He is possessed of a very
cultured charm, a dignity of speech,
and a prepossessing stage presence,
which have come with his long asso-
ciation with the theater. True, he is
horribly "theatrical" at times, always
a bit poseur, and he plays in the
grand manner of the matinee-idol of
yesterday;-a trick of holding his
head to exhibit a Grecian profile, a
graceful and expressive dalliance of
the arm, the dilated nostrils, the noble
crease of the brow,-Mr. Faversham
knows all these. Yet it is a grand
style,--artificial-but then Jim Car-
son is so patently a type of the the-
ater, it matters little.
The play is a high romantic opus,
improbable and interesting,-sent-
mental at times, and with a good deal
of the bluster of the great open
spaces. The plot concerns an English
gentleman of title, who takes upon
himself the disgrace of a weak-kneed
relative, and then removes to the
United States, where he settles among
the Indians in the Southwest. Jim'
there marries an Indian maiden of
considerable beauty and undoubted
virtue, and when he is called back to.
England refuses to leave his Venus
noire, a scene wherein Mr. Faver-
shain displays his histronic ability
with much gusto.
Strangely enough, perhaps, it all
works out into a surprisingly good
show. Mr. Faversham knows his the-
ter, and Jim Carson, if not a creature
of flesh and blood, (a possibility which
the playwright, not the actor, abso-
lutely precluded), it is a capital dra-
matic exercise, rather a novelty in
these prosaic days of Eugene O'Neill,
"Abie's Irish Rose" and the glorious
sagas of sex, and the American
marines.
* * *
WE RECOMMEND
It is not often that a motion picture
merits comment. But we call to your
attention the fact that John Barry-
more is in a picture at the Wuerth-
"The Sea Beast." It is an exceptional
picture, and John Barrymore is Bar-
rymore, so that we feel no hesitancy
in recommending it,-even at the ex-
pense of missing that sublime artist
of the silent drama, Mr. Harry Lang-
don. It will be a good thing to take
shocked mamas to after "Glencairn."
w w
THE MAY FESTIVAL-V.
FIFTH CONCERT-Saturday, May

22, at 2:30 o'clock.
SOLOIST
MISCHA' LEVITZ I, Pianist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, Baba Yaga".....Laidow
"VERKLARTE NACHT"...Schonberg
SYMPHONY, No. 2 in D Major.Brahms
Allegro non troppo
Adagio non troppo
Allegretto grazioso
quasi andantino
Finale-Allegro
con spirito
CONCERTO for Pianoforte and

SKILLED REPAIRING

MANN'S

OF
Ave

SALE
FELT HATS
are closing out all of our
SPRIN(. HATS

PE
0 "
r,'Q '

get a Rider
Maszerewil'Now
You will want one for your finals.
No uncertainty about a Masterpen. It writes at "touch-holds
six to twelve times as much ink, and will outwear several pens
of other makes.

Skidding Garters!
AGRIPPA - WED makes garters act in an i
entirely new way-and only in gostons can
this web be had. Even when worn very loose
it will not slip. It cannot curl and yet it is
remarkably soft and light. Here in act is a
practical, comfortable, ventilated-web garter.;
In many pleasing colors, 50c the pair.

at Reduced Prices.f
No Better Hats Made.
We clean and block hats.
High class work only.
FACTORYr HAT STORE
~17 Packard Street. Phone 711).I

GLO0RG S" 1C0T COM PANY
'O STON

__ . .

I-

24 HOUR SERVICE

PLE ASE
MAK E
ON THE

going to aide a Hammock or Pursue
Other Rough Sports This Summer?

Spring is the
Time to Beautify
the Home!
Let Harding rc-cover your
furniture with attractive de-
signs and colorings.
P. B. Harding

F SO, this won't interest you. But
if you want a chance to test your
mettle, to acquire some valuable busi-
ness training and to pull down any-
where from $40 to $80 a week while you
are doing it, give ear to this.
XWoman's World-a "magazine entering
1,325,000 homes monthly-invites am-
bitious college men to enter its subscrip-
tion sales organization for a special cam-
paign of eight weeks, during the months of
July and August. Under the direction of
I seasoned veterans, you will be instructed in
both the theory and practice of salesman-
ship and you will be paid in proportion to
the enterprise and ability you manifest.
The work is dignified, intensely interesting
and keeps you out in the open. No other
branch of modern business offers such
I large or such quick returns as does the
sales department. This is a real opportu-
nity and we will help you make the grade.
A letter or postcard will bring you full details
without obligation, together with a booklet of let-
ters from other college men who are in our em-
ploy. Write promptly, as units are now being
filled.
AddressMr. P. M. Hinman, Director of Sales
The Magazine of the Middle W
107 South Clinton Street, Chicag

0

- .

I:

GeorgeRogers, 21 ears of
Age, Ha Averaged' $50 a
Week for Eight Months
Mr. nogers left college
in his Sophomore year-
health and finance both
played out. X3or the past
eight months he has been
in Woman's World sub-
scription sales organiza-
tion averaging $50.00 a
week-and he looks like
an athlete.
Vest
go, Illinois

Z18 E. Huron

Phone 3432

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S{(
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THE PUNISHMENT
Attributing much of the suceess of
the combat against crime in New York
to the aid accorded by newspapers, a

.,
.

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