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May 04, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-04

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0

PA~F FO~r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUES~DAY, MA'?'4. 1024

s vy.ti,..,t a r .,. ... _,.

Published every morning except MonAay
during the University year by the Boat in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news1
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
tredited in this paper and the local news pub-
limhed therein.

q,
1;'
6

with such immense responsibilities as
government ownership of industry im-
plies.
CONVOCATION-A SUCCESS
It was an embarrassing day Sun-
day, for those who with smug com-
placency announced that the Student)
council's plan for holding Convoca-1
tions for discussion of {topics in the
field of religion in which students'
might be interested would attract a
"mere handful." The more than 4,0001
students who filed into Hill auditori-
um Sunday to hear Dr. Alexander
Meiklejohn, former, president of Am-
herst college, discuss "The Student
and His Religion," constitute a direct
refutation to such pessimistic asser-
tions.
The 4,000 heard a masterful presen-
tation of a vital subject by an educa-
tor of eminence. But they gained

ED OLL
OVER
YOUR
HE A DS

MUSIC
DRAMA

r

GRA Fl AM19

Entered at the postoflice at Ann .Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. special rate
of .postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master. General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
X4.00.
na-iAnnArbvr Press Building, May-
wtard Street.
Phones: EditoriL 4923; t'ssiness, 01214.
DITORIAL RTAFX
Telephone 4935

We are always reluctant to run ma-
terial which we don't quite under-
stand. How do we know that they
are not subtly salacious or otherwise
distasteful to the readers of this de-
partment? And then on the other
hand we have to admit a strange sort
of admiration and awe for any com-
munication which goes over our head.I
Sometimes we have a vague feeling
that they are just plain dumb and
that we are the same for thinking
that they are too much for us. #

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, 1 ditorial Board....Norman R. Thal
News Editor..........Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor..... ....Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor............Joseph Kruger
T elegraph F~iaor..........William Waithour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smit H. .Cay Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykk W. Calvin Patterson
Asoistant City Editors
Iwin Olian i F Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

+.

Gertrude Bailey
t Charles Beh ymer
* e('orge Berneike
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Can Burger
a Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
James T. Herald
Russell Hitt
Miles Kimball
Marion Kubik
; iarriett Levy

Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rgsenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Hlenry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 31214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising........... . ..Rud olh Bostelman
Advertising...........-.... . L. Mullin
Advertising........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation...............James R. DeP y
Puiblication...........Frank R. Dent, Jr.
Accounts.............--.... Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

something more than this; their's was So you see that running contribu-
the inspiration which cannot but at- tions is not; all pie either. Neverthe-
tach to such a group of young men less its getting toward the end of the
and women. Youth, enthusiasm, vigor, year and everything, and so will take
-they were in attendance. a chance and present this poem by the
Being one of the few occasions in nicotine adict.
the academic year when any appreci- But not before we express our awe
able portion of the student body gath- at the Music and Drama department
er in one building, with common which does not seem to consider theI
thoughts and feeling a common bond superlative as single. For instance
of sympathy, such a convocation if we say that John Smith is the
marks an event in University life. It greatest ventriloquist in the world, we
makes for a feeling of unity, a feeling generally mean to imply that there ame
Of "one-ness," in the student bod no other ventriloquist in the world to-
of onenessin thestudet bod
which ordinarily is lacking. It is only day who are equal or superior to Mr.
rarely during the year that such an Smith. In other words that Mr. Smith
opportunity is given the University's excells them all.
students. During the football season, Not so our neighbor. Mr. Shaw for
the seasons of othersports, and at pep instance shares the honor of being
meetings, students do eet around a the world's greatest playwright with
meetingsNsillents dhares tratndame
common rallying point, and a unity of Mr. O'Neill, who shares that same
thought and interest does exist. How- honor with Mr. Williams. And then
ever, with the air highly charged, and of course, Holberg and Gilbert are the
with an electric thrill stirring the world's greatest playwrights, too. It
student group,. such a meeting is in seems to sort of class of people.
Now take Mr. Shaw's works for in-
sharp contrast to the quiet, yet inspir-snOf akMrhas worksforhin
ing convocation of Sunday.stance. Of all the plays that he has
Quietly the 4,000 filed into the audi-- written "Catherine" is the cleverest
torium, as though to a church. There and most amusing. But on the other
was a conscious feeling of restraint, hand the most amusing as well as the
which continued only until Dr. cleverest is "You Never Can Tell."
Meiklejohn began the presentation of This sort of thing puzzled us for quite
his subject Then it disappeared,- a time. Now we think we have it all
melted slowly. As he concluded, the doped out. The idea is, we believe
audience, as with a single thought, --at any play which is presented in
and quite forgetting the earlier feel- Mimes theatre is automatically given
-ing of constraint, burst into loud ap-the title of the World's greatest play.
plause. Itrwasn artin conclusionIt is like the president of the United
plause.thItewas anfyittingfconclusion
for an inspiring service; a tribute to States there is only one of them at a
a masterful speaker. j time but they still are called presi-j
SThefstrf vo sak hb..dent when they get out, and above all,
fistConvocatio has been suThe there will probably be a lot more of
And it has been a success. Threethm
similar meetings will follow during them.CON FORZA.
the month of .May; upon the recep-O
tion accorded them will depend the I
ion ccodedthe wil deendtheMusic had power to shake an ancient
continuance of such a series of meet- ow en
ings next year. : town
___s__extyear._"By faith the walls of Jericho fell
down."
"Radio Music Law Is Urged"- That power persists and will not peter
headline A lot of it ought to be ruled T p e s we

George H. Arinable, Jr.
W. l.arl Bauer
John H. Bobrink
Stauley S. Coddington
WV. J. Cox
Aarion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Have
I arold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F. A. Nor zst
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wmn. C. Pusch
Nance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wm. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

..+

TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1926
Night Editor-W. C. PATTERSON
THE RIGHT TO STRIKE
Strike? The one recourse of the

oppressed laboring man, the magic V unconstitutional. Dead Baal still trembles when our
word which he so blindly follows, has singerslshilt.h
again been called in England, and this singers shout.
tine on such a grand scale and with EDITORIAL COMMENT The stern alumnus feels a trifle queer
suhaterrible aspect that the whole C M E T Tesenaunsfesatil ue
such a thWhen "Laudes atque"; steals upon his
structure of government faces a se-
vere test. The old issue of capital vs. A RIFF WHO CAN RUN are moved to tears when crit-
labor has rached its risis. j IAnd"we aemvd-otaswe rt
labor has reached its crisis. (The Boston Transcript) ics solemn
It is true, of course, that any meas- Between sunset and sunrise Ham-] M'ke Shavian music in th' adjacent
ur4 which isfor the benefit of the Imouch ben Hadj, a Riffian soldier . column.m
underdog is worthy of profound con- aged 67, ran one hundred and ten . III
sideratio4i, and that labor, and the kilometers, from the Atlas hills to
metems In youth's bright lexicon of harmless
problems that labor faced, were sadly Oudja, in French Morocco, with ahg
in need of' some remedy for the ills ainFenhMooco it f things
m sessage from Abd-el-Krim's head- What more innocuous than Senior
which a bigoted and narrow-minded quarters for the Riffian representative. Sings?
capitalistic tyranny forced upon it. It Or so, at any rate, a dispatch from Yet here's a fact that makes the ma-
is likewise true, however, that human- Oudja tells us. One hundred and ten sons groan:
ity has certain rights, and that these kilometers are 68.31 miles. This man Music has power to rot away the
rights may stand on a par, if not' of 67, we are informed trotted the stone.
above, those of the employees of a well nigh seventy miles over a rough USTAVA KAEL
single industry. mountain country, in a single night. * *
The strike in England at the present The achievement makes the smartest The night after we saw the 1926
time exemplifies this fact notably; to Marathon run look small. It beats the 'Ensian we couldn't sleep. Figures
paralyzestinsportationin'tnglandps recordeo
paralyze. transportation in England isseventy-mile-record of Saunders, in and names ran through our head like
to wreck an inutterable hardship on 1882, of that distance in 11 hours, 34 railroad trains. One of these days a
the millions who depend on the trans- minutes and 5 seconds. As the time B. M. O. C. is going to have so many
portation systems to bring them from sunset to sunrise on April 28 insr
their daily bread. Lives will be lost the latitude of the Atlas could not activities to his credit that they will
theirttd fteAta ol o fill five activities charts and a whole
and suffering endured by innocent ; have been more than ten and a half page in the 'Ensian. Then the Re,
parties, and these for no purpose what- hours, the man must have run nearly gents will have to pass a rule say-
soever except to show that the rail- seven miles an hour, and over moun- ing that a"student'can't participate in
road workers are in sympathy with tain roads, within that time. This is more than ten activities while he's in
the miners. The result will be in- not Marathon speed, but it is more the University.
evitable,-if the strikers remain firm, than Marathon duration. An English But think of it! Suppose, let us say,
the people of the nation will be forced runner, Dixon, has run fifty miles in that a B. M. O. C. is a fraternity man.
to relieve the situation, through their 6.18.26. That's one thing. Suppose also that
government; and the exercise of this The natural comparison of the feat i he has made one of the athletic teams.
force on the Dart of the strikers, leav- is with the performances of the Ro- Another. Then let us say that he is
ing, as it does, no alternative for the man and Turkish couriers, or the An- Managing Editor of The Daily in his
people who suffer, is tyranny just as dean Indians of Peru and other South senior year. That makes three more
surely: and just as dangerous as American countries. We read of the things. to put down, because it's cus-
that of. capital itself. Force is always Persian couriers in the service of the tomary to pick the M. E. from one of
a dangerous weapon, and a thousand Ottoman sultan who ran from Con- the other upper staff positions. Thus
times so when wielded in such a stantinople to Adrianople and back, a it would make it run So-Arid-So, Dina'
short-sighted manner as it often is by distance of 220 miles, in two days and Mita Blasta, tennis team (2), Daily
organized labor. nights. The Peruvian or Andean (1), (2), Night Editor (3), Managing{
The right to strike is perhaps a couriers exceeded even such records Editor (4). Then since he is a B.
necessary safeguard in the present as this, their extraordinary staying M. O. C. Extraordinary he will prob-
system of society, but it can never be powers being attributed to the sus- I ably make Pi Delta Epsilon, national
an unmitigated blessing. It is eco- taining effects of coca leaves, eaten honorary journalism fraternity, and
nomically unsound in the first place, on the course. Michigamua. Suppose, then, that he
since it involves the loss of time by Such masterly performances as the goes into one of the professional
the working man and the loss of Riffian Hammouch belong, of course, schools. He makes a professional fra-
money by the capitalist; and it is un- to the domain of stamina rather than ternity. Another -line in the 'Ensian.
sound from a humanitarian viewpoint to that of speed. It is nothing great Too, he made Phi Beta Kappa, and in
because labor, in its ignorance and to run a short distance at the rate of his sophomore year was a member of
the ignorance of its leaders, has gain- more than ten miles an hour. It is, Adelphi and played in the Opera and
ed the impression that the only way however, something very great to run the annual Comedy Club production.
to accomplish the desired end is by seventy miles in ten hours, by night, Since he continues university his
'ni~~kino''th, nPso'n1cP cifft.r until the ,. . r ,(. - , A. -- .. - A1. ._..«_ ,81 ..«7. . . . ... .. -

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THE ORGAN RECITAL
Due to the absence of Palmer Chis-
tian, who is now on a concert tour,
the weekly Organ Recital will be giv
en by Mr. G. Calvin Ringgenberger,
director of music at Albion College,
Albion, Michigan, tomorrow afternoon
in Hill auditorium at 4:15 o'clock.
The program will be as follows:
Suite Gothique, Op 25.. Leon Boellman
Introduction-Choral
IIMenuet Gothique
Pastorale (Sonata 1, Op. 42).Guilment
Fanfare.........Jacques Lemmens
Fantasie in A ..............Franck
Allegro vivace (Symphony 1)....
.Vierno
Arioso (In the ancient style)....
.........James H. Rogers
Will o' the Wisp..............
.. .......Gordon Balch Nevin "
Foutain Reverie.... Percy E. Fletcher
Festival Toccata......Percy Fletcher
* * *,
"THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE"
A review, by Sir Toby Tiffin.
Add to the list of amateur produc-
ing organizations which are achieving o
something more than conventional
stock interpretations of worthy plays,!
The Detroit Repertory Theatre. Work-
ing under the greatest handicap be-
cause of inadequate stage facilities,1 odd Shae
they give a well conceived and highlyr
enjoyable performance of Shaw's HAL
(seems to us we've heard that name STATE STR
before) "The Devil's Disciple" every
week-end evening.
This play has always appealed to
us as the high water mark of Shavian
endeavor. It does not show anything
particular as to the author's psy- P LE
chological development perhaps, but
it is one of the few cases in which
their is "a real effort at good dramaticD0®
construction, and to Americans at
! least, the keenest satire and most
amusing comedy. Few scenes in all M A
Shaw's pieces can compare with the
Burgoyne scene and few characters
are as richly amusing as "GentlemenPAT
Johnny." It is easy to dismiss Dick
Dudgeon with a "typically Shavian"
and let it go at that. But the devil's
disciple is more than that. He has the
swagger of a Cyrano, the intelligence CAR
of a Washington and the tongue of a CAw
Shaw.
In the performance which Richard
Forsyth gave the intelligence was
made paramount and the swagger
somewhat restrained because of the
dimensions of the stage. He not only
gave a convincing portrait of the lead-
ing part, but added a deal of well
thought out interpretation. It is rare
when an amdteur gives a real inter-
pretation; it is rarer when he adds a
sound bit of character study of his
own. In the third act Dick does not
merely bluster, he is not a completely'
developed character, as in many pro-
ductions, he is faced with death and
enjoys it no more than you would.
Possible because of this, Winnett
Wright, the director, who directorwise
chose the part of Burgoyne failed to
run away with the last act, as is the
usual custom. Although he played it
with intelligence, it was our impres-
sion that he was not truly familiar
with the lines which Mr. Shaw gave
him, and although we do not claim to
know the play by heart, we believe
they lost much of their punch through
improvisation.
The rest of the cast were adquate,
if uneven. Judith was given a color-
less performance by Helen Granzow,
! and Anthony Anderson in the hands
! of Henderson Shields typical minister
and a coward, but never the man of
action which Shaw intended. The set-
tings were very nice indeed.
,* * *
THE MAY FESTIVAL-IV.

FOURTH CONCERT-Friday,l May
21, at eight o'clock.
SOLOIST
GIOVANII MARTINELLI, Tenor I
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
HOWARD HANSON, Guest Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Juventus"... de Sabata
ARIA, "0 Paradiso" from "L'
Africana" .............. Meyerbeer
"THE LAMENT FOR BEOWULF"
(First Performance).... Hanson
ARIA, "Cielo e mar" from "La
Gioconda"............Panchielli
"ON THE SHORES OF SORREN-
TO" .....................Strauss
RHAPSODY, "Italia"........ Casella '
NEAPOLITAN SONGS Six
SALTARELLO .........Tschaikovsky
(The important event of the Festi-
val will be the appearance of Albert
Spaulding, violinist, at the Friday af-
ternoon concert.)
* * *
THE PLAYERS CLUB Al
The following students were elected FLORENCE

-geY a Rider
hiasterp, en"

z-

OWAM

hatch Crystals
LLER'S
BEET JEWELERS

ASE
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THE
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You will want one for your finals.
No uncertainty about a Masterpen. It writes at touch-holds
six to twelve times as much ink, and will outwear several pens

Organizations:
Now is the time to have that
Spring Picture
taken.

Now

./'. . "./" " . //'i'"./. e "./a/~«/'>". d"rI"./' ".Im". ". .ddr*1. :6" I"'. , /".d~.I " .I'd .A ° A. A"./"'. J «/ 'I. I ",/"'.s° ".A"..+ 'r

For the
k of Koi

Amateur Photographer, we carry a complete
DAKS and KODAK SUPPLIES. Prompt devel-

stoc

Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.
ATOTEDSOFTH DA OE
AT BOTH ENDS OF TIME DIAGONAL

cping and printing of films.
sraus >Io
AJ7DL1ID10

24 HOUR SERVICE

of other makes.

C SKILLED REPAIRING H ski o, J

AS7.4

Aqnnounces

'L
c/
t:d

,ancin at 8 o'clock On iht
It .akeside (Formerly Jim Burke's)
Whitmore Lake
nsn by Reuel Kenyon and Hs
U NIVE RSITY R A MBL ERS
Dancing Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday

NO OS ALE AI K TS
MAYNARD STREET
Concerts for $5.509--$6.00--$7,00

(If Festival Coupon is returned from Choral Union Ticket,
deduct $3.00 from above prices.)

RTISTS ARTISTS .
AUSTRAL CONDUCTORS CHARLES S'RATTO-N

-11

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