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May 02, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-02

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PAGE 1'Oi IC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 2, 1926

Published every morning except Mondiay
duringthe University year by the Bu m in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication' of all news
dispatcheshcredited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50, by mail,
* $4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. May-
sard Street.
Phones: Editorial. 4921; busIaeus, :24.
DI'OR1AL BTAF
Telephone 4988
5A
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
g CharmanEditorial Bo.....Norman R. Thal
ty Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor............Manning Housewortb
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor .............. "Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistaat City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude Bailey Harriett Levy
Charles Behlyiner Ellis Merry
George Berneike Dorothy Morehouse
William Breyer, Margaret Parker
: Philip C. Brooks Stanford N. Phelps
Farnum Buckingham . Archie Robinson
Stratton Bick Simon Rosenbaumn
Carl Burger Wilton Simpson
Edgar Carter Janet Sinclair
Joseph Chamberlain Courtland Smith
Meyer Cohen Stanley Steinko
Carleton Champe Louis Tendler
Douglas Doubleday Henry Thurnau
Eugene I. Gutekunst David C. Vokes
Andrew Goodman Marion Wells
ames T. Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Russell Hitt Thomas C. Winter
Miles Kimball Marguerite Zilske
Uarion Kubik '
BUSINESS STAFF
feephone 2114
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRONW. PARKER
Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising............Rud(lph Bo telman
Advertising............Win. L. Mullin
Advertising........homas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation.... ........ James R. DePuy
Pubhlication.,.......Frank R. Dentz., Jr.
Accounts.................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable, Jr, Prank Mosher
W. Carl Bauer F. A. Norquist
John H. Bobrink Loleta G. Parker
!-"ianlcy S. Qoddibgton David Perrot ,
W. J. Cox dg Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
Mary Flintermnan N'ance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Have# Win. J. Weinman
arold Holmes Margaret Smith
Os~car A. Jose Sidney Wilson

The student body need not rise in
angry protest at the "iron-handedEOLL
methods of a ruthless faculty" to se-
cure that measure of self government ; h/J,,r////4
that is implied by the phrase "student s
governinent." Students need only EYFRYQUIZ
show some manifestation of interest _
in that government which is now
theirs, dominated and controlled by Someone could write a stunni
them, and the more earnest and in= play in one act centered about a clas:
spired members of the group will room during a quiz. There would ce
achieve the rest. In other words, if tainly be the necessary conflict Pro
students at Michigan are to secure vs. class, and the humor of the si
their own, their student, government,
they must show that they are awake well as the pathos won
and interested by taking part in their be striking. The idea strikes ou
own elections next week. imagination so vividly that we fe
tempted to write it ourselves.
AUTOMOBILES AND FISH Let us call it:
A X ..._- .. .._ .,.: . ... 1_._.,. 7_..... I- 1] 1 ChAT :T n1'4 n "

music
AND
DRAMA.

III

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIAL
STATIONERY FOR MOTHER
A box of fine stationery with a special cover bearing a beautiful reproduction of an
oil painting, together with appropriate lines from Edgar Allen Poe for Mothers Day.
Special, 9Sc

ng
fs
,r-
of.
it-
ski
ur
gel

THE MAY DAY FETE
A review, by Marian Welles.
Russian music, at once western and
oriental-visions of peasants in holi-
day attire, folk dancing, Wagner-
program was complete. Joseph Sain-
ton told all about it and Ethel Lewis
and E. Bruce Metcalf proved that it'
was true.
Mr. Sainton gave first a sympathe-
tic biographical sketch of Richard
Wagner. He pictured the great mu-
sician as we like to think of him: an
idealist, a free spirit, careless of con-
ventions, forsaking his friends and
yet living on them. Then Mr. Metcalf
sang Wagner as we like to hear him
sung. His interpretations were sin-
cere and deep. He brought out the
refined volume that an artist finds in
Richard Wagner.

W~rapped for i3alinig.

Limited Number of Boxes.

AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

Many complaints have been laid ata
the garage door as to the troublest
brought on by the rapid increase int
automobiles. But the most recent is
more unusual than most of them: that
the asuto has been the cause of thet
scarcity of game fish. It was brought
out recently by the war department,t
which was defending itself against a
charge that its dams were depleting ,
the fish supply.
Much can be said for the truth ofl
the assertion that the auto, by bring-
ing the lakes and streams within
easy reach of many persons, has re-
duced the numbers of fish. Whereas
formerly it was necessary for the'
sportsman to journey for half a day
to reach the fishing grounds, now he
can get there in a few hours. Then,'
too, the popularity of traveling out to
summer cottages every night from the
office has sounded a death-knell for:
the fish.
However, there is the fact that, for
many, golf clubs have been substitit-
ed for bamboo poles. And also, many
who formerly spent the day waiting
for a thrill from fishy depths, now go
out and find them in dodging other
auto drivers. At any rate, the war
department has provided a servicable
and authoritative alibi for the luck-
less Isaak Walton.

"ONE O'CLOCK"
the time of the quiz, and let us choose
for the characters.:
Assistant Professor Angelo B. Swill-
snitcher.
Mr. Andrew J. Fork-who wants to
talk all the time-and say nothing.
Mr. Simon N. Nife-who would like
to keep quite as possible.
Miss Sadie Spoon-who thinks she
knows enough to talk a great deal.'
Mr. Hiram L. Plate-who, would
like to get the prof. started on some-
thing else.
Miss Minnie Cup-who knows noth-
ing but doesn't even know that.
'Mr. Eli C. Napkin--who is given to
slumber in class.
And eta.us take for the topic under
consideration, the electoral college.
The roll has been called, and then:
Ass. Prof. Swillsnitcher:
Now,,fJor-the topic today, let us first
consider the Electoral College, er Mr.
Plate, has this college any actual
power?'
Plate:
Well, that depends, now what 1
don't understand, Sir is just how in
Roosevelt administration they came
out the lway they did because
Profi We shall stake up that later
Mr. Plate, but first let us consider the
topic
Plate: Yes Sir but that is just what
I don't understand, because last week
you said that it was
Prof: Yes, we shall come to that
presently but first
Plate: But I can't answer that un-
less I know, -
Prof: (evidently rather experienc-
ed) Very well, that is what I wanted
to know, Thank You.
(Plate continues object by loud
whispers and pantomime to the effect
that it is all a jip, and that he knew
that stuff cold but.)
Prof: Miss Cup, would you answer
the question?
Miss Cup: Yes sir it has a great1
deal of power. It elects the presi-
dento of the United States....
Prof: But has it any power of
choice? Has it the right to decide
which--
Cup: Oh, yes, there are usually
two or three candidates and the elec-
toral chooses one. It has the power
of choosing one of the three.
Prof: Well how is the electoral
college chosen?
Cup By the congressmen Sir.
Prof: Hardly Miss Cup-er-Mr
Cup: But what I meant was the

MANNES c
SALE
MAN C Bxr 0 F
OF FELT HATS
We are closing out all of our
SPRING HATS
at Reduced Prices.
No Better Hats Made.
We clean and block hats.
High class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.

Irving Warinolts,D S"C
LIIIROPODIST AND
ORTHOPEDIST
707 N. University Ave. Phone 81212

AUTO PARTS
For All Makes of Cars.
TIRES FOR SALE.
JUNK CARS BOUGHT
PHONE 3035.
KESSLER BROS,, Canal Street

A

II

i
1
3
1
,
i

Sunday Dinner, $1.00
Evening Steak Dinner, $1.00
Norm Gilmore's Five Piece Orchestra
from 1:00-2:30 and 6:00-7:30
CHINES GARDENS

PLEASE
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

Now that London men have decided
to discard vests during the summer,
we can hope that soon they will roll
up their shirt sleeves and get to work.
A submarine detector has been
perfected, which enables ships to dis-
cover the presence of the man-made
fish at great distances. And now for
one that will detect real fish.
The biggest piece of money in the
world is an old Swedish coin, two feet'
by one foot, weighing 32 pounds7'
Imagine the size of the slot machines!.
Versailles, France, will soon have a
street named Rockefeller. Chorus:
"Paved with gold."

106 South Main
T O S

1

MIE SAFEiS'T' GU°7T
IN MOTORDOM"

Dial 5515

I

-- y
SINDAY, MAY 2, 1926
Night Editor-W. C. PATTERSON
A STUDENT ENTERPRISE
SUPPORT IT
A year ago, Dr. Alexander Meikle-1
John, one-time president of Amherst
college, and hailed as the liberal lead-
er of a new movement toward renais-
sance in the American educational
system, appeared in Ann Arbor. With
his earnest attacks upon the "conven-
tions" of present-day education wide-
ly heralded in the press, he stood for
the time being near the focus of stu-
dent attention,- and an audience be-
yond the capacity of Hill auditorium
sought the opportunity to hear the
man who expressed sentiments col-
lided so sharply with the venerated
customs of the past.#
Today, Dr. Meiklejohn comes again
to Ann Arbor. This time he comes as
the first speaker in the series of four
lectures which have been arranged
by the Student council as the Univer-
sity's first effort to promote Sunday
convocations for discussion of non-
sectarian questions believed to be of
vital interest to students. His sub-
ject, "Students and Their Religion,"
Dr. Meiklejohn will, no doubt, develop
in the manner so characteristic of
him. He may say things of which all
do not approve; he may advance
thoughts which he himself will freely;
admit appear highly impractical; but
above all, his addiess, if it follows
the Meiklejohn type, will be one cal-
culated to stir the so-called student
lethargy into serious thought.
At many colleges, especially those
of limited enrollment, Sunday chapel'
is an established part of the school's
program. Students attend in a body;
they listen, sometimes to men of
eminence; and, at least occasionally,
come upon a new viewpoint of ques-
tions which often form the center of
student discussions. Such a plan willi
be Inaugurated today at the Univer-
sit; upon the success of these serv-
iees during the next four weeks will
depend its continuance next year.
Surely, the Convocation series merits
active support.
HAVE YOU NO INTEREST?
If there is anything commendable in
hn institution, that institution is worth
supporting. Student government is!
no exception. If there is anything
worthwhile about student government.

EDITORIAL COMMENT

I

A ROMAN ROW
(The Boston Transcript)
'Justice along the shores of the
Mediterranean was always more or

1Ethel Lewis_____________________
And then Mr. Sainton talked about
Russia. He tracedl the developmen A
of Russian music from the provincial L A N D E R S
folk song, through the first operas of
Michael Glinka to Rachmaninoff and 0 R
Lakowsky. Russia appeared benight- i L O W E R
ed, starting out at a disadvantage, if
oe can c al ta isadvatage to be
restricted to Italian opera, butlbeingS
given an inch it took an ell and so we
have Hiefitz and Korsakov. The story I
was fascinating, romantic, and the
lecturer spent some time on .Glinka.
He called him the father of Russian
music and placed "A Life for theI
Czar" at the fountain head of slavic
music.
Ethel Lewis, clad in a brilliant 320 E. Liberty
costume of the Russian peasantry Da
traced the same history in song. Her
petite figure, her grace and daintyj.
manners, combined with the jeweled
headress and colorful gown made herj
rendition of the folk songs realisticC
and thoroughly charming. "The Girl J's
Who Would Not Dance" and "Little & JWhnbto 's
Zashka" who finally did dance was & Weber's
particularly good, and "A Song of I
India" ever familiar is always appre-, C hocolates
ciated. Mrs. Lewis seemed a figure I. h c l t s
taken bodily from a holiday fete in For Mother's Day
old Russia and transferred to an!-
equally colorful, though less romantic We wrap for Mailing
May fete in the - ball room of the
Michigan Union. =Free
Mrs. lannah T. Vosper, in giving
the tea yesterday afternoon, brought = Magazmes-Films ~.
to Ann Arbor a trio of artists which
were talented, experienced, and if oneO
appreciated. uiyPhamac
* * * 118 North Fourth Ave.
THE MAY FESTIVAL-Il.
THIRD CONCERT-Friday, May 21,
at 2:30 o'clock. Fili11 iIIII IIlIIillliiilillID 1lhIllI {1c i

Every time you see the two glowing amber
balls you will know them as the only head-
lights which make night driving safe.
They are the E & J Type 20-the one head-
light which must supercede all the faulty,
glaring, eye-straining, dangerous headlights
in use today.

:Headlight

less mixed up with politics, and prob- congressional districts vote on them
ably it always will be. For this rea- not the congressmen themselves.
son the wise foreigner in those parts (A rather loud snore from Mr. Nap-
is careful to keep entirely out of the kin. General snickers and guffaws
clutches of the law. This is generally from most of the class. The Prof. of
an easy task, but it often involves course, didn't hear it.)
keeping one's temper and bridling Prof: You say that the congres-,
one's tongue. It is possible that sional districts elect the electoral col-
young Mr. Abbott of Boston, late of lege. Then how would the voters in
Harvard, who at this writing is the districts choose the president?
languishing in a prison in Rome eu- Cup: Oh, it isn't the congressional
phemistically called the Queen of districts, they voted on the president,
Heaven, was not duly attentive to the but
rule when, in the Eternal City, he fell '(The class titers. At the seat back
into an altercation with a guide, who of Miss Cup Miss Spoon whispers to
is said to have treated him with dis- Mr. Nife something about "it is semi-
courtesy in a public place, and, be- formal." At once Miss Cup contin-
sides beating un the man as a gentle- ues)
man should, himself got into trouble Miss Cup: But-they do it semi-
when the man brought a gang of his annually. That's it.
friends and called Mr. Abbott out of Prof You believe that they vote on
his lodgings. It is alleged by the the president semi-annually?
Italian accuser of Mr. Abbott that he, I (The class contains itself with
the American, used, somewhere in the much effort so)
affray, language derogatory to Signor Miss Cup: (Nervously) Yes sir.,
Mussolini; and such language is now er- that is semi-annually every four
against the law in Italy. Nothing but years.
praise of the great Duce is permitted. (The class can contain itself no
But if we know the habits of -Ameri- I longer, and Miss Cup subsides amid
can university men, this is an unlikely many blushes and dirty looks at the
allegation, because it is customary Prof. who is grinning himself, per-
for educated Americans to be logical hamps, although his moustache hides
in their affrays, introducing no ex- it.)
traneous matters, and Signor Mus- Prof: Well does anyone know what
solini had nothing to do with the when or where the electoral college
question at issue between Mr. Abbott is?
and the Fascist guide, Salvatore As- (The loudness of his tone awakens
trologo. Everybody gets behind Mus- poor Mr. Napkin who seeing his
solini nowadays. It is a fair assunip- chance rises and with a loud voice
tioh that Mr. Abbott, who is said to says:)
speak no Italian, never mentioned f Mr. Napkin: Yes sir, I do. My
Signor Mussolini. I brother went there and he won seven
The affair has some comedy ele- block "E"s.
ments, but it is no joke to stay for Terribly Swift Curtain
ten days in a Roman prison, nor is it * * *
a 'courteous act to a foreign people That ought to give you a rough idea
to deny to an accused man, on whose of what we mean. After four years of
side the presurption of inoffensive- that they give the students a degree.
ness is strong, the ordinary privileges And after seven the prof. gets ,a va-

E & J Type 20 is positively without glare.
It illuminates the whole road perfectly for
distances up to 500 feet and more-twice
the distance of an ordinary headlight. It
spells the doom of the dimmer because it
eliminates the glare. Let us demonstrate
Complete Per Pair, $50.
(Manufactured uner Bone patents.8-30-21 and 1-13-24, other patents perni
Rider'saen Sho
315 State St.

1
t f
i
- I
ti4i 4

c,
3'

k
3

SOLOIST
ALBERT SPALDING, Violinist
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
J. E. MADIDY, Conductor
CHAMBER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
...PROGRAM..........
OVERTURE
CONCERTO for Violin, D major..
...Mozarrt
CARNIVAL OF ANIMALS......
.Saint-Saens
For two pianos and chamber orchestra
RONDO CAPRICCIOSO.. Saint-Saens
CANTATA:
"The Walrus and the Carpenter"
.......................Fletcher
Children's Chorus
VIOLIN SOLOS:
Nocturne in G ..............Chopin
Hark, Hark the Lark........
.Schubert-Spalding
Evening Song .......... Schumann
Palpiti ..................Poganini'
(The important event of the Festi-
val will be the appearance of Albert
Spalding, violinist, at the Friday after-
noon concert..
* * *
)JICIIIGANEYSI A

.... ... .... ... .... ... ... .... ... .... ... ...

May

Festiva

10ckets

PNW'N SALE AT
ii
MAYNARD STREET
SiX Concerts for $5.50,--$6.00--$7,00
(If Festival Coupon is returned from Choral Union Ticket,
deduct $3.00 from above prices.)
ARTISTS ARTISTS
FLORENCE AUSTRAL CONDUCTORS CULES STRATTON
MAM I E SlN1)LIV'S . m I T-n RICCARIDO BONELLI

I

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