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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-01

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1

P,:OE t OUTR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATRi)AY, MAY 1, 1920

Published every morning except Motnay
during the University year by the Boat In
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
snaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $s.Se; by mail.
$4.00.
Offices: An* Arbor Press Building, May-
ttrd Street.
Phohea: Editoria, 4s; bUslass, 11214.
XDITORMA BTAFI2
Iepboue 415
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R That
City Editor...........Robert S. .Mansfield
News Editor..........Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor.............. Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama........Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeWore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
William Breyer
Philip C. .Brooks
Farnum Buckinghan
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
e hamberlain
M~eyr Cohen
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
Anidrew Goodman
Jaes T. Herald
Jusllitt
Miles Kimball
Ijf.ron Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
D~orothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaumi
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. \okes
Mtarion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

I

BUSINESS STAF
'pelephole 2114 /;
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advrtising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising............Rudol Bhostelman
Advertising.............. "" ..L. Mullini
Advertising........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation.............-.-.James R. DePuy
Publication.............. Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts............ -....Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

now wholly lacking, and should go
a long way toward promoting a group
feeling and loyalty to college; in ce-
menting friendship it should prove
invaluable. More than that, the stim-
ulating nature of such group iifej
should be reflected in increased inter-
est in intellectual pursuits.
At any rate, the experiment in.mod-
ern education which may be tried at
Harvard college, perhaps at Michigan
and other institutions, will be followed
closely by educators. It may provide
a solution for many of the problems
of modern education.
THE VOTE SLACKERS
"The whole system of American
government rests on the ballot box,"
the President of the United States
told the congress of the Daughters of
the American Revolution. "Unless
citizens perform their duties there,
such a system of government is
doomed to failure."
The increasing laxity at the polls
which Pesident Coolidge pointed out
is not easy to combat. The appeal
which he made on patriotic grounds
will not bring many more busy busi-
ness men or their equally busy wives
to the polling places. The reason the
vote continues to fall off is due
largely to the great difficulty of as-
certaining what the candidates really
stand for and to the difficulty of
nominating candidates whose records
are good.
When neither of the two leading
candidates is able to show a past rec-
ord f1ree from graft and charges of
crookedness, and when both side-step
the issues of the campaign with such
agility that no voter can guess what
platform they are running on, it is
hard to persuade busy men and
women that they should leave their
own affairs to take part in an elec-
tion. The general lack of interest in
politics in America accounts for many
of the citizens who fail to vote, and
the general confusion as to the aims
and ideals of the candidates causes
the proportion of votes to fall still
lower.
The future of the nation does rest
on the ballot box. And if candidates
can be persuaded to declare definitely
that they are "wet" or "dry," "pro-
World court" or "anti-World court,'-
on one side or the other and not in
the typically American position of "on.
the fence"-it will be a much easier
task to get the citizens of the country
to go to the polls and vote for the
men who stand for their beliefs in
American life.
A FORECAST
Just before the battle the freshman
> class will meet around the festive
board to pep up for the big spring
drive. No campaign is complete
now-a-days without a big opening
banquet; no big action can be put
across without a meeting to arouse
the proper degree of spirit.
Then, of course, there is the fac-
tor of fellowship which is promoted
by such a dinner. Everyone is al-
ways ready for conversation at a ban-
quet-as the lengthy remarks of the
toastmaster indicate-and an oppor-
tunity to meet others is thus opened.
And as a means of hearing those who
will lead the class in the Spring
games, it is a necessity for the proper
conduct of the affair. This banquet
will serve as an indication of the
strength and spirit of the freshmanr
h class, a forecast of the results of th
d games.
The Ku Klux Klan idea has been
e introduced into India, a hooded or-
d ganization being formed among the
I British in Bombay. Their slogan will
d be "India for the British."

c

TOASTEDROLL
ODERN
FOLK
~ILOREL

I

}.
t:.

No great work of art or science was
ever created in summer. We don't
know the statistics on this matter,
but we make this sweeping statement
on our own experience. For we can
even create a small number of inch
of printed words, with or without any
meaning during this heat.1
Formerly in the nice snappy days
of autumn and winter we could dash
off a column single handed and start
another equally rotten, without feel-
ing it. These days it takes all our
energy to write one complete one
and were it not for the brilliance of
certain contributing members of the
board, we would have to leave large
white spaces on the editorial page.
It is not that we have nothing to
say,. or have run out of ideas, for in
tis sort of stuff, one idea is as good
as another, and everyone has ideas,
you can't help it. The difficulty is m
pounding the typewriter. The amount
of breeze in this office is such that
were one to stand a match on end it
would never be blown down, save if
someone. sneezed.;
Thus one can readily see what a
task this must be......All we want
is a slight recognition of well meant
effort.-'
WHY PROFESSORS DON'T WEAR
PRINCE ALBERTS IN CLASS
ANYMORE
A Folk Tale.
Many years ago, my little friends,
it was the custom for members of
the illustrious faculty of Michigan to
wear Prince Alberts or frock coats to
classes. As many of you have noted
these same men do not wear they
any more. They are replaced by plain
business suits or golf suits or unclas-
sifiable suits. Mostly the latter.
The reason for this may awaken
some curiosity in your little hearts,
so we will tell you. Originally pro-
fessors all wore glasses and never at-
tended class without forgetting some
part of their apparel, be it ever so
small or important. They always car-
Tied umbellas, rain or shine and were
never sen when they were not either
lecturing or reading. This was part
of their system, just like porters in
stations wear red caps, and artists
longhair. No frater in Universitas
could even hope to apply for a job
without the necessary appearance.
We remember distinctly one man
who was nearly a pauper because the
optician had told him i t would "ruin
his eyesight to wear glasses, especial-
ly when reading. Hence he was in a
nost terrible plight, since he had
t either to give up glasses or reading,
ad this kept him out of a job for
many years. Finally, we understand
he moved to England where he had no
trouble at all since he could wear
a monocle on one eye and read with
the other. This only one example
of the importance of the frock coat or
Prince Albert as it was sometimes
called.
But now, my dear young friends,
everything has changed. Somewhere
some unknown professor after getting
his job and being sure of keeping it,
took off all the trappings of his as-
sociates and wore plain, civilian or
business .clothes, according to what-
ever the local terminology is. This
started a fad which has never ended,
Nowadays every professor makes it a
point to look as human as possible.
Some of them, it is true, have a pretty
hard time, but they all at least de-
serve credit for trying. Now that golf
has become the rage they are even
seen in knickers and some even go as
far as 'wearing white knickers!
The obvious reason for this new
attitude is that the more modern mem-
bers of the faculty have had college
educations in the modern sense. Be-
sides learning Latin and other such

s matters they have learned how to
t dress and be generally "smooth."
t And now, my friends, who scan say
e that the world is not moving forward?
*I . --- * *

THIS AFTERNOON: The May Day'
Fete in the Michigan Union ball room
at 3 o'clock.
TONIGHT: Comedy Club presents
Bernard Shaw's "You Never Can Tell"
in the Mimes theatre at 8 o'clock.
, *

Wrapp~ed for IMaillltf.

AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIACONAL

THE O'NEILL PLAYS
When the Provincetown Players of j
New York produced Eugene O'Neill's
cycle of sea plays, "S. S. Glencairn,"
for the first time last November,
Arthur Hornblow, editor of the Thea-
tre Magazine, wrote the following
criticism:
"These three plays," he says,
"though never before given on a sin-
gle bill, were so intended to be pre-
sented, and the Provincetown PlayersT
have rendered aservice to the Eng-
lish-speaking drama by so giving
them.
"They are of distinctly unusual}
merit, and none of them could have
been written by anyone other than
O'Neill. The best by far is the final!
act, 'In the Zone,' because it posses-
ses something more than a mere faith-
ful photographic representation of
life. An exception, too, should be
made of the first piece, 'The Moon of
the Caribees,' for though the earliest
of the cycle, it is informed with a
poetry lacking in the others. 'Bound
East for Cardiff' is a powerful melo-E
drama, skillful enough of its kind, but
in essence simply a slice of life.
"'In the Zone,' however, has a
dramatic story-that of a sailor on a
ship passing through the submarine
zone, whose box of love letters is
mistaken by his shipmates for a
bomb-a story shot thorugh with an
ironic comment of life and character
over and above the mere detail of the
story. But the culminative effect of
these three dramas is what is really
important. It shows the advance of
O'Neill as a dramatic artist and an
interpreter of human emotion. With-
out them 'Anna Christie' and 'The-
Hairy Ape' would have been impos-
sible.
"The acting and the production
were alike admirable. The parts were
all quite frankly types but they were
finely differentiated by the various
players who interpreted them."
The production by the Mimes on
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday of next week will be the firstI
performance of the cycle as a whole
outside of New York city. The de-
l miand for seats for "S. S. Glencairn'"
has been greater than any previous
production in the Mimes theatre, and
over five hundred tickets have been
sold in advance of the public sale
which opened at the State Street
bookstores yesterday morning.
THE WAY FESTIVAL-II.
SECOND CONCERT-Thursday, May
20, ,at eight o'clock.
SOLOISTS
'MARIE SUNDELIUS, Soprano
JEANNE LAVAL, Contralto
CHARLES STRATTON, Tenor
THEODORE HAR.RISBN, Baritone
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
PROGRAM
"ELIJAH". ............ Mendelssohn

Osteopathic Physicians Dial 7451
Drs. Bert and Beth Haberer W
Corner William and Maynard
Ann Arbor, Mich. == Student Car at a Hot Price?
One Ford Coupe, good tires and motor ..........$30.00
For All Makes of Cars.
TIRES FOR SALE. a One Chevrolet Sedan, extra good motor, fair tires.... .$50.00
JUNK CA RS BOU QHT
PRONE 3.335. One Overland touring, late model ...............$45.00
KESSLER BROS, Canal Street
-And Plenty of Others.
PLEAE ACHEVROLET SALES
shley and Huron Streets Dial 9314
D O N 'T . !1![![![[I 6[ [ [ [[ [[t[ ! [[ 1 [ I IiI [!!['g

Srr r i n mr'. 1 i rit Intlml il~Ifl,&dt

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t

PATHS

I --
am M.
I #

K I N N E YS
Latest style Men's Black or Tan Oxfords.
Exceptional quality. Priced at

Music
AND
DRAMA

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIAL
STATIONERY FOR MOTHER
A box of fine sationery with a special cover bearing a beautiful reproduction of an
oil painting, together with appropriate lines from Edgar Alien Poe for Mothers Day.
Special, 98c

MAN NS c r
I u 1 I.

Limited Number of Boxes.

.1'

George H. Annable, Jr.:Frank Mosher
W/Carl Bauer E. A. Norquist
JhAn H. Bobrink L-oleta G. Parker
Afiley S. Cgddingtonl David P~errot
W. 1.yCox' g Robert Prentiss
N aron A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
ary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan ijlbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kennieth H~av Win. J. Weinman
] arold Holmes Aargaret Smith
Oscar ,A. Jose Sidney Wilson
SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
"Womena have qualities of mind
peculiarly feminine; but they are
not the tntellettual equalsof men.
Their intuitive sense is the big-
gest thing that they bring to poli-
tics. Combined with 'the thinking
qualities of men, this makes a
splendid working team. It would
be better for women to use the
abilities they have and not attempt
to do what they can not do."-
Mrs. Henry Moscowitz, chairman
of the Democratic publicity com-
mittee.
THE COLLEGE-GROUP SYSTEM
With educational institutions grow
ing tremendously in size, bringinge
vast andanew array of problems whicr
demand consideration if colleges an
universities of the nation -are not tc
slip complkely into a system of fac
tory routine, there comes a possibl(
solution in the form of the so-calle
"college-group 'system." Many uni
versities, no:' doubt, have considere
the wisdom of adopting such a meth
od; it rAquires that existing collegeE
be broken :up into smaller units; i
ains to promote more effective stud:
and to foster greater social contacts
At Michigan, proposals of a some.
what ;imilar nature are being consid
ered as possiblities of the future
Whether or not they can be worker:
out, .;remains to be seen. But fron
Harvard ,college comes the latest pro
nouncement of support for the grou.
plan.
i Harvard, in common with other grea
institutions, has certain problems re
lating to the social contacts of in.
dividual 'members of the student body
As pointed out in a report of the Har
yard student'council, eating in com
mons brought students together in th
early days of the university, and a
a .result, all' shared in the opportuni
ties of healthy social intercourse anm
stimulatipg interchange of ideas.
IHowever, with the growth of th
institution, and since "it is no longer
fashionable to eat in commons," vari
ous clubs have come into existence
These now provide for the social lif(
of a large portion of the student body
For the great majority, however, ther
remains no common rallying poini
there is no common ground, and a,

OF
We

FELT HATS
are closing out all of our
SPRING HATS

$3.98

4 ,98

r--
-. ,p y " A

at Reduced Prices.
No Better Hats Made.
We clean and block hats.
High class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE

L F71A t P own

112'

S. MAIN STREET

Packard Street.

Phone 7415.

- $x.90

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it
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EDITORIAL COMMENT

OUR INTEREST IN DISAR3IAMENIT
. (The Illinois State Register)
The United States will spend thi
year on its military establishment
nearly $600,000,000. Whether thai
amount be too much or too little ther
is no question that it is based upon
the amount of money to be expended
by European nations for the same pur-
poses.
Therefore it is easily seen that the
United States has a vital interest in
the work of the preparatory commis-
sion for the disarmament conference
which will meet at Geneva, May 17
We may not be concerned about any
European quarrels, but we have oui
own defense to look out for. The
problem of reducing armaments ough
to be of as much interest to us as the
defense of our country against out-
side attack.
What of the growing competition ir
10,000-ton cruisers, the limit fixed by
the Washington Conference? Is thi
of importance only to England, Japan
Italy and France? The United State:
has deliberately 'refrained from rush-
.. r. n t n it~ s . hn i cr 1li

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A CRIB FOR THE CI'RRENT
EVENTS CONTEST
Find the, answers to the following
questions and you will get the $200
prize in, the current events contest
this morning. The list is given out at
the last minute in order that the com-
mittee in charge cannot suppress the
paper. ,
1. HoW often is the Atlantic Month-
ly published?
2. H6w often is the Century maga-
zine published?
3. Who-was murdered yesterday in
Chicago?
4. What is the amount of bootleg
brought in across the border every
day? Have you found it good?
5. Who is ruler of Italy?
6. What is the longest knownj
speech of Coolidge, and why was he
ii Ito int nih

Jeanne Laval, Contralto

(The important event of the Festi-
val will be the appearance of Albert
Spaulding, violinist, at the Friday
afternoon concert.)
THE MAY DAY FETE
Mrs. Hannah T. Vosper is giving a
May Day Fete in the form of a mu-
sicale for the benefit of the Women'sr
League building this afternoon in theI
ball room of the Michigan Union atj
three o'clock. The program will in-
clude as guest artist Joseph Sainton,1
director of the Toledo Opera Associa-
tion and conductor of the Toledo
Philhnrmonie orchestra. assisted by

Electricity, which can release
woman from her burdens, has
already created a revolution in
American industry. Wherever
mankind labors, General
Electric motors can be found
carrying loads, driving machin-
ery and saving time and labor.
And there is no branch of elec-
4.-:nl dAnn1- - fn m -na

In a field in sunny Spain stands a stoile mortar.
Crows hover around it, picking up bits of grain and
chaff-cawing.
Here Marcheta, in the fresh beauty of her youth,
will come to pound maize. For years she will pound
maize. The stone will stand up under the blows;
not a dent has the muscle of three generations of
women made upon it. But the crows will hurl their
black gibes upon a woman aging early and bent
with toil. Old Marchet'a-still in her thirties.
The American woman does not pound maize. But
she still beats carpet; she still pounds clothes; she
still pumps water. She exhausts her strength in
tasks which electricity can do better, and in half
the time.
The high ideals of a community mean little where
t:n- " ;e if-;11 A^ -- a ..A~~... D~nre P1+ a o vnir_.

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