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May 01, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-01

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ESTABLISHED
1 890

C, , r

anp

~ait

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

OL XXXVI. No. 156 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1926 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FRENCH NORDEBT
MHEETS OPPOSITION
ISENATE DISPUTE
BORAH WOULD INQUIRE INTO
FRANCE'S CAPACITY
TO PAY
ASK INVESTIGATION
Coolidge Recommends That Settlement
According To Present Terms
Be Approved
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, April 30.-The
French war debt settlement was trans-
niitted to Congress today by President
┬░Coolidge and it immediately met with
'n outburst of opposition in the Sen-
ate. Demands that the finance com-
niittee make a thorough-going Inves-
tigation of all the facts upon which
t:e American debt commission acted
were made by Senator Reed, Democrat,
Missouri; Chairman Borah of the for-
eIgn relations committee and Senator
Harrison, Democrat, Mississippi.
Chairman Smoot of the finance com-
mittee, who is a member of the debt
commission said he would have no
objection to calling on the treasury
for all documents and papers relating
to the settlement.
Asks Cooperation
"Butwill the senator cooperate in a
real investigation?" demanded Senator
Harrison.
'I am not going to cooperate to hold
this settlement up until after adjourn-
ment," replied Senator Smoot.
Senator Reed warned that unless
the committee examines every docu-
mnent, every paper and the minutes
of the debt commission, if any, touch-
ing on the settlement there will be
"difficulty in getting Senate action on
the agreement.'
Chairman Borah wanted the com-
mittee to go out of the field suggested
by other senators and inquire into the
real capacity of France to pay since
'that principle had been made a basis
of the settlement.
"France is the most prosperous na-
tion in Europe", he said, and "has
been prosperous for the last three
years. If we cannot collect more than
fifty cents on the dollar it is because
the French citizens are not willing to
pay taxes commensurate with the ob-
ligations placed upon them by the
original agreemet.
Proceeded by nator Reed, Mr-
Smoot went into some of the details
of the negotiations disclosing that
after rejecting the first French pro-
psal last Monday the American com-
mission had made a counter-proposal
which the French government accept-
ed yesterday.
"How long did the meeting of yes-
terday list", asked Senator Reed.
"It was brief," replied Senator
Smoot, "the French accepted our pro-
posal and all that was necessary was
to sign."
Senator Reed reported that there
had been more secret negotiations in
the foreign debt settlement than there
were surrounding all secret treaties I
"down the ages" which President Wil-
son denounced.
In transmitting the debt settlement,
President Coolidge sent only a brief
message to Congress. After formally
announcing the signing of the agree-
ment under the provisions of acts of
Congress he said:I
Calls Agreement Fair
" I believe that the settlement upon
the terms set forth in the agreement
is fair and just to both governments
and recommend its approval."
While the agreement contains no
security clause relating to German
reparations it carries provisions simi-
lar to those of the other debt settle-

ments ,providing for temporarily post-
poning annual payments in cases of
emergencies. Under the terms of this I
clause up to 1932 France upon 90
days notice can suspend for three
years that p-art of any annual pay-
ment exceeding $20,000,000 while after
that year it can suspend all of any
annual payment for a like period of
time.
Seniors Swing
Canes Sunday,
Members of the class of '26 will ap-
pear on the campus tomorrow with
their walking sticks to observe Cane
lay, the first of the official traditions
$bserved during the final month be-
'fore Commencement.
Our~eserAn

Convocation Plat
In Eyes Of T
Michigan's convocation series, which
will be opened by Dr. Alexander
Meiklejohn, former president of Am-
herst college at 11 o'clock Sunday
morning in Hill auditorium, has gained
favorable comment in the columns of
the Christian Century.
The Christian Century magazine.
which is published in Chicago is a
non-denominational church press or-
gan with an international circulation. '
The new plan of the Student coucilj
to hold student services each Sunday
morning at Hill auditorium during
the month of May has also been re-
ceived with cordial interest by local
pastors. The article in the Christian
Century entitled "Michigan Students
Plan Own Services" is a manifestation
of the new plan's reception in national
theological circles.
'BRATTONCONTEST
Although Republicans Control Upper
House otion Is Approved
Without Protest

a Wins Favor ALL LITCHFIELD RACE BALLOONS
ILOISTSheologicalWrldREMAIN IN AIR;_S-20 MAY WIA
!zolgialWoldTf l______ 011101~

7

A ll 1111II IIU.%1"%5111111%

The novel plan of having a new ; U 1IU L U d LJdLL 1IULd
speaker on the program at each con- t
vocation has been highly praised. The
idea of a rotating college preacher 9T 105PITAL I1ED
has never gained much momentum in
state universities where the accom- ONE DAY MEETING PLANNED
paniment of compulsory attendance AS PART OF ANNUAL
has not been possible, but it is hoped
by the sponsors of the convocations COVENTION
,here that the services planned are sup-
plying a need that has been prevalent jSTUDY X-RAY WORK
on the campus for a long time. The
article continues: "These are days of Visits Through Research Laboratories
youthful initiative. But perhaps this,
is the first time that college youth Included In Program Announced
have asked for more religion and set By Dr. Hickey
themselves to secure it and secure it
on their own terms. Many eyes will More than 200 radiologists from all
be watching the experiment at the parts of the country will convene here
University of Michigan." May 19 when the American Roentgen
Ray society will hold a one-day ses-
sion of scientific demonstrations and
lectures in connection with the 27th
annual meeting of that organization,
to take place the week of May 17 at
the Book Cadillac hotel, Detroit.
SThe organization is national in its
Storm Hampers Work Of Fire-Fight- scope and composed of physicians who
ers As Flames Sweep Standard 1 have achieved prominence in the field
of roentgenology. This will be the
Oil Reservoir second medical organization holding a
national meeting in Detroit to arrange
LIGHTNING IS CAUSE for a session at the University hos-
pital this year.

CHARGES KEPT SECRET
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, April 30.-Without
discussion or a roll call, the Senate
today agreed unanimously to dismiss
the contest brought against Senator
Bratton, Democrat, New Mexico, by
Holm 0. Bursum, former Republican
senator.
Although the Republicans control
the Senate the resolution of the elec-
tion committee recommending dismis-'
sal bf the charges, offered by Sena-
tor King, Democrat, Utah, was adopted
without a protest.
This action was in sharp contrast
to the Iowa contest, which has ab-
sorbed the attention of the Senate for
weeks and resulted in the unseating
of Senator Brookhart, Insurgent-Re-
publican, in favor of Daniel F. Steek,
Democrat.
The New Mexico senator never
broke through a veil of secrecy. The
exact charges against Senator Bratton
were never made public, though pub-
lic hearings were held most of the
arguments were made in written
briefs, the few made verbally being in
executive session. After the investi-
gation, the committee voted unani-
mously to dismiss the'charges.
Today's action leaves only one elec-
tion contest to be disposed of by the
Senate, the Minnesota contest brought
against Senator Schall, Republican,
by Magnus Johnson, former Farmer- I
Labor senator.
FRESHMEN NAMED1IENER
BANQUT TOSTMSTER,
Class Will Choose Captain Of Spring
Games; Finn, '26, WIll Talk
William L. Diener, '26, president of
the Union, will act in the capacity of
toastmaster at the annual spring ban-
quet of the freshman class next
Wednesday night in the assembly hall
of the Union, it was announced last
night. Diener presided over the af-
fair a year ago as underclass chair-
man of the Union.
The underclass department, work-
ing in conjunction with the social
committee of the freshman class, has
completed arrangements for a combi-
nation banquet and pep meeting. The
freshman captain for the spring
games next week-end will be elected
at the banquet, which in the past has
been done -at yearling pep meetings
just before the games.
Joseph Finn, '26, chairman of the
spring games committee, will address
the first year men relative to the an-
nual freshman-sophomore classic, and
will explain the 'rules in detail.
Entertainment provided for the ban-
quet, will include several selections
on the xylophone. Lester Johnson,
'27L, chairman of the underclass de-
partment, will speak.
Cards reminding freshmen of the
banquet have been mailed to all mem-
bers of the class as well as letters to
all campus organizations asking their
cooperation with the Union in spon-
soring the affair.
Tickets in large numbers have been
disposed of by members of the class,
the committee reports. There is a
limited number still available at the
main desk of the Union. They are

i

I

(By Associated Press)
BAKERSFIELD, Calif., April 30.--
Hampered by a storm which washed
out embankments and covered high-
ways, hundreds of workmen today bat-
tled a fire of a 500,000 barrel crude oil
reservoir in West Kern river storage
farm of the Standard Oil Co., of Cali-
fornia, five miles northwest of here.
The fire, which was started Thurs-
day night by lightning, is in the cen-
ter of a field of underground reser-
voirs, each with a capacity of 500,000
barrels. Many of the containers are
not full. It is estimated 6,000,000 bar-
rels of low gravity oil are stored on
the farm. Two miles away, on the
main storage field of the district,
there are 40 such reservoirs, each five
acres in extent and covered with wood
and asphalt roofs.
Fifty-eeveu lives and approximately
$15,000,000 damage is the toll of oil
industry disasters in the west and
southwest for the month.
FATHERS' DAY1PLAN
COMPLETED BY UNION~
All men students on the campus1
who plan to attend the fourth annual
Fathers' Day banquet at the Union
with their fathers Saturday, May 15,
are asked by the committee in charge
to procure tickets at once for the
affair due to the large demand which
has been made the past few days. The
tickets are on sale at the main desk
of the Union priced at $1.50 each. This I
Includes special privileges for fathers.
Paul Starrett, '27A, chairman of the
Fathers' Day committee of the Union,
stated yesterday that the entire pro-
gram, starting with the Cap Night
ceremonies Friday, May 14, and clos-
ing with the Hill auditorium convo-
cation Sunday, is now complete. From
all indications there will be more
fathers in -attendance than in any
previous year.
500 COPIES OF
'ENSIAN REMAIN!
Less than 500 copies ei the 'Ensian
remain to be given out. As only a
few additional copies were ordered,
j most of these are books not yet called
for by purchasers.
The regular distribution will be
continued at the business office at the
Press building until Tuesday night,
May 11. Holders of receipt stubs
must call for their copies at once;
after May 11 books still uncalled for
will be forfeited. The office wIll be
open from 1 to 5 o'clock every after-
noon except Saturday, when the hours
are 9 to 12 o'clock.
Police Would Halt
Playing In Streets
Rpeated warnings have failed to
stop the baseball playing in the
streets and lawn extensions, accord-
ing to Chief of Police O'Brien, and all
violations of the ordinance which for-
bids it are being prosecuted.
Numerous complaints have come
from residents concerning students
n0vn helinte71?taadn np

i

Will visit Laboratories
The Ann Arbor program is under
the direction of Dr. Preston M. Hickey,
professor of roentgenology at the hos-
pital. In addition to numerous talks
by members of the medical faculty
it will include a demonstration in the
research laboratories of the physics
department of the University and an
inspection of the roentgenology divi-
sion of the hospital.
The delegates will arrive in Ann
Arbor by bus at about 10:30 o'clock
in the morning and will proceed di-
rectly to the physics laboratories,
where Prof. Harrison M. Randall, di-
rector of the laboratories will conduct
a demonstration of radio research.
The party will then be taken to the
hospital and make a tour of inspection
of the X-ray department. Luncheon.
will be served to the members of the
society at the hospital at 12:30 o'clock.
The afternoon will be given over
to a series of lectures in the hospital
amphitheater, beginning with an ad- t
dress by President Clarence Cook
Little at 2 o'clock. The President will
discuss "The Occurrences of Struc-
tural Abnormalities in the Descend-
ants of X-rayed Mice." le will be
followed by Dean Hugh Cabot of the
Medical school who will . describe
"Renal Cases Illustrating the Value of
Oblique and Lateral Roentgenology."
Dr. Max Peet of the surgery depart-
ment will give a "Report of Brain
Abscesses Localizable Only by Ventri-
culography," and Dr. A. E. Pohle of
the roentgenology department a "Dem-
onstration of a Recording Roentgen
Dosimeter."
1rWison To Give Paper
A "Comparison of the Information
Gained by Roentgenographic, Cardio-
graphic, and Physical Examinations in I
Diseases of the Heart and Aorta" will
be made by Dr. F. N. Wilson of the
internal medicine department at 3:20
o'clock. The electric stetophone wil
be used for this demonstration. The
concluding part of the session will
consist of a report analyzing the re-
sults of a questionnaire sent out to
radiologists under the direction of the
sex committee of the National Re-
search council. The analysis wil be
made by Dr. Hickey. _
Veasey Finishes
Lecture Series
James A. Veasey, general counsel
for the Carter Oil company, concluded
a series of five lectures on "Oil and
Gas Leases" yesterday morning at 11
o'clock. -
Mr. Veasey dwelt at some length
upon the various kinds of leases which
might be drawn, pointing out the ad-
vantages of each and citing numerous
cases ifrom various states. He also
mentioned the comparative youthful-
ness of the industry, and the fact that
there was no large capital invested
in it until 1876.
"At least 75 per cent of all wells
drilled are unproductive," lie said,
"and it is probable that there has
been more money invested in oil than
has been returned by the productive
fields."
Cestre Ends Work;
To Lecture In West

(By Associated Press)
LITTLE ROCK, Ark., April 30.-All
of the nine entries in the Litvhfield
trophy -and national elimination race
that started here late yesterday, were
believed to be still in the air tonight.
The pilot balloon, Skylark, landed
in eastern Tennessee about noon to-
day. At last reports most of the bal-
loons were over eastern Kentucky
traveling in an easterly and north
easterly di-rection that would carry
them over the Allegheny or Blue
Ridge mountains into West Virginia,
Virginia, and possibly Pennsylvania.
The last balloon reported early to-
night was a U. S. army balloon which
passed over Winchester, Ky., at 3
o'clock this afternoon traveling to-
ward the northeast. It was thought
probable here that this balloon was
the S-20 which this morning reported
its presence overRumsey, Ky., in the
jnorthwesteren part of the state in a I
telegram addressed to the Associated
Press and dropped by the pilot Lieut
W. E. Gray. The S-20 is from Lang-
ley field, Virginia. She was the most
northerly of the balloons reported to-
day and stood a good chance it was
stated, by officials of the race here,
to catch a 40 mile southwest wind
that would drive her almost northeast
over Pennsylvania.
From the balloon race will emerge
as victors the three who are to fly
huge 80,000 cubic feet balloons filled
Iwith coal gas in the Antwerp meet,.
and thea1926 holder of therfamous
Litchfield cup.
Maj.-Gen. Mason M. Patrick and
such notables as Commander John
Rodgers, chief of the Naval air serv-
ice, Orville Wright, pioneer in air- 1
plane invention ani chairman of the
contest committee of the National
Aeronautic association, Qodfrey L.
Cabot, president of that organization,
and Col. John A. Paegelow, command-
nig officer at Scott Field, Ill., vho lost
a dirigible in an untimely accident
yesterady, are present for the meet.
SENATORSPPROVE'
Interstate (ommerce Committee Of
Senate Will Report Shortly
On Dill Measure
HOOVER IS CRITICIZED
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, April 30.-The Dill
radio bill, which would set up an in-
dependent commission with complete
power over broadcasting, was ap-
proved yesterday by the Sen-ate
interstate commerce committee with
indications pointing to an early fa-
vorable report to the Senate.
Taken in the face of repeated warn-
ings from President Coolidge against
establishment of any more separate
government agencies, the action had
the effect of side-t'racking the White
bill, backed by the administration,
providing for an advisory committee
to work with the commerce depart-
ment in controlling the industry. This
bill has passed the House.
Meanwhile, Sec. Herbert Hoover,
whose department recently lost in the
federal courts the 'right to assign
wave lengths to radio stations, took
exception to statements recently made
in Congress to the-effect that he was
attempting to become "dictator" of the
radio world.
"It's the last responsibility I want,"
he asserted.
He reiterated his opposition to any
plan leaving to any one official the
responsibility of determining who
shall broadcast and on what wave
lengfh, because of the expense and
bureaucratic tendencies involved..
These duties, he said, should be
placed on a semi-judicial board or
commission, -as provided in the White

1 bill, and the administrative or en-
forcement end left to an existing gov-
ernment department.
"So far as the commerce depart-
ment is concerned," lie added, "we
have no feeling as to what depart-,
nent does the administering."
LAWYERS HOLDI
SECOND ANNUALI
SPRING FORMALI

iil

WI LL OLD CURRENT
EVEINTS TEST TODAY
Select University's Representative
In Competition With 11
Other Schools
AWARD $250 TO WINNER
Michigan's entrants in the New,
York Times intercollegiate current
vents competition will meet in the pre-
liminary examination at 9 o'clock this I
morning in room 2003 Angell hall.
The winner of today's contest will re-
ceive $250 from the Times, and will
represent the University in the com-
petitive examination to be held be-'
tween 11 institutions May 15. Medals
will be given to the winners of both
preliminary and final tests.
Events of permanent significance,
worthy of the front pages of metro -
politan dailies In three separate cities, t
will be considered eligible material '
for the examination. As the contest
is being held on short notice this year,
only the period between October 1,
1925, and May 1, 1926, will be covered.t
There will be four sections of ques-
tions, the first two solely factual and
the last two involving interpretation.
At the beginning, there will be a large1
number of "true and false" state-
ments, followed by another large1
group of factual questions to be an-
swered in a few words. In the sec-
ond part, the first section will include!
points to be taken up briefly, with1
some interpretaton, and the last set
will consist of five or six subjects to
be discussed in 150 or 200 words each.
Each contestant must bring a sealed1
envelope, containing his real name on
the inside, with a fictitious name writ-
ten outside, which is also to be writ-
ten on the test paper. This is in order
that the judges will not know whose
work they are grading.
The examination, which is to be
three hours long ,will be conducted
under the proctor system in general
use at the University. After consider-
able discussion at the general com-
mittee meeting in New York, it was
decided to leave the question of honor
examinations up to the individual
universities. Those at Virginia and
Princeton will in all probability be
conducted under the honor system,
while the other institutions have not
yet announced their intentions.
20 WILL MAKE
INSPECTION OF
HOSPITAL TODAY
More than 20 hospital directors and
superintendents from the eastern part
of the country will be in Ann Arbor
today to inspect the University hos-
pital. The party will spend the day
observing the organization and build-
ings of the local plant and will be the
guests of the hospital staff at
luncheon.
The group comes here from Detroit
xwhere yesterday was devoted to in-
spection- of the new out patient de-
partment of Grace hospital and the
i nurses' home of the Henry Ford hos-
pital. Heading the delegation are Dr.
Winefred Smith, director of Johns
Hopkins hospital, Baltimore, and Dr.
Frederic A. Washburn, director of the
Massachusetts General hospital, Bos-
ton. Hospitals in New York, Roches-
ter, Montreal, and Providence will
also be among those represented.
WILL REPEAT SHAW'S

COAL STRIKE IINENT AS
ENGLAND'S SUBSIDY ENDS,

(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 1.-Cessation of
all work in the British coal
mines, beginning today, seemed
inevitable in the early hours of
this (Saturday) morning. Mid-
night, when the government's
subsidy ended and the mine own-
ers lockout notices were to go
into effect, passed without an
agreement being reached between
the parties to the dispute. Thus
unless contrary instructions are
forthcoming from the miners'
federation the men will remain
away from their work today, and
the country will be plunged into
another coal strike such as par-
alyzed the industry in 1921.

l

PITCHiNG BATTLE
MARKS WOLVERI1NE
WIN OVER ORANGE
IMLLER'S HURLING IS FEATURE
OF CLOSE CONTEST WITH
EASTERN INVADERS
ALLOWS SIX HITS
Syracuse Threatens To Score In Sixth
But Miller Tosses Three Balls
To End Dangerous Inning.
By Joseph Kruger
Don Miller, once the pride of Syra-
cuse, N. Y. when he was a high school
pitching star, yesterday twirled the
Wolverine Varsity nine to a 3-0 vic-
tory over the Syracuse university team
in the first contest of a two game
series. The two teams will meet again
at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon.
Miller pitching his first full game
since the spring trip, held the Orange
players to six hits, and sent nine back
to the dugout via the strike-out route.
On the two occasions that the visitors
threatened, the husky moundsman
tightened up and struck out the next
batter, each time with but three pitch-
ied balls.
Oosterbaan Gets Homer
Benny Oosterbaan, playing in Mi-
ler's place in right field, provided the
batting sensation of the afternoon
wh'en he slammed one of Schlegel's
offerings far over the left fielder's
head for a homer, in the sixth inning,
this being the first run of the close
contest.
Schlegel and Miller engaged in an
interesting twirling duel, both pitchers
allowing but four hits in the first six
innings, and it looked like anybody's
game until Oosterbaan's four base hit.
The substitute outfielder again
started trouble for the Syracuse pitch-
eer when he singled into right field
after Jablonowski, who was stationed
at third base, went out in the eighth
frame. Loos was then safe on a
fielder's choice, Oosterbaan being
tagged out by Hanson. Wilson fol-
lowed with a single and then Lange
sent both runners across the plate
with a two base wallop.
The visitors threatened to score in
the sixth inning when Ringwood, the
Syracuse captain, got his second hit
of the game after Schlegel had struck
out. Richmond then flied out to
Lange, Ringwood stole second, and
Peck followed with a single, putting
his leader on third.
With two out, and Vic Hanson, the
star all-round athlete of the eastern
school, at bat, Miller purposely threw
four balls, walking Hanson and filling
the bases. Benzin then struck out, end-
ing the inning.
In the fifth inning, Benzin drew a
base on balls after Hanson flied out.
Beischline followed with a long fly to
J Lange, and then Val Lenglen dropped
a hit between three Michigan players,
Benzin going to third, and Van Leng-
len to second on the throw-in. Eise-
man then fanned;
Game Errorless
The defensive work of both teams
was perfect for the afternoon, not an
error being chalked up for either
team.
Harlan Walter is slated to take the
mound for the Wolverines In today's
encounter, but it is not known who
I will be Coach Lew Carr's choice' It
I a lefthander opposes Michigan, Ooster-
baan will take Lange's place i left
I field. Otherwise the regular outfield
Iof Lange, Puckelwartz and Miller will

be in their
The box

places.
score:
Michigan
AB

Loos, ss..........
Wilson, lb (capt)
Lange, if..........
Edgar, c .........
Miller, p.........
Puckelwartz, cf ....
Kubicek, 2b......
Jablonowski, 3b ....
Oosterbaan, rf .....

4
3
3
4
2
2
.3
3
3

R H
1 2
1 1
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
1 2
3 7

R
R
P4
H
B
B
V
E
S

Totals ...........27
Syracuse
AB
ingwood, ss (capt) 4
ichmnond, 3b......4
eck, If............4
anson, 21).........3
enzin, lb..........3
eischline, cf.......4
an Lenglen, rf .... 3
isemann, c........ 4
chlegel, p ......... 3
Totals ...........32

Po
1x
0
0;
0
3
0
2
1
0
'72
Po.
1
1
0
4
0
0
0
2
0

A
3
7
3
9
1
3
1
0
0
27
A
4
1
1
3
6
2
1
5
1

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

IH
2
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Through a maize of serpentine andj
a shower of confetti, members of the
Lawyers' club danced their way to{
the conclusion of their second annual
spring formal last night in the lounge
room of the club. With Stewart's
Syncopators, a seven piece band from

0 6 8 24 0

Summary: Home runs-Oosterbaan;
Two base hits-Loos, Lange. Struck
out-By Miller 9, Schlegel 4. Bases
on balls-Off Miller 3; Schlegel 2.

,

I

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