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April 28, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-28

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. .

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 192S

Published every morning except MoDAay
turing the University year by the Boar in
Control of Studen Pubicatins
Members of Western Conerence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the. use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not eterwise
tredited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
M ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
master Genkeral.
Subscription by carrier. $3.50; by nail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
aard Street.
Phones:EditorIal, 493; Ilaess, 01214.
XDfTORLL STAFI,
Telephone 4924
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIB
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
City Editor...........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor ........... Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor............. oseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........Wiliam Waithour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
kubert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
Ceorge Berneike
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
Farnumi Buckingham
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Iagar Carter
4osph Chamberlain
eyer Cohen
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
James T. Herald
Russell Hitt
Mites Kimball
Marion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
D~avid C. Vokes
Marion Wells
C~assam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Ziske

plan will provide a national memorial
to a national figure.'
It is exceedingly difficult to estimate
the tremendous good which has re-
sulted from the untiring efforts of
Walter Camp over the many years of
his career. He exerted a splendid in-
fluence in developing sound sports-
manship among young men, and the
universal regard and respect with
which his name is held will take ap-
propriate form in the proposed me-
morial.
All) FOR PURE SCIENCE
In this age of dividends and finan-
cial registers, the average American
is prone to place particular emphasis
on immediate or, at least, foreseen re-
sults to the exclusion of effort under-
taken with less material, though no
less definite, ends in view. While the
United States has easily lead the
world in the field of ap lied science,
it has sadly neglected pure scientific
endeavor.
As might be predicted from his
earlier contributions to our welfare,
Herbert Hoover has realized the seri-
ousness of this situation and has ap-
plied his powers of solution to it.
Under the auspices of the National
Academy of Science, the heads of
great corporations and educational in-
stitutions hav.e combined to raise $20,-
000,000 and to plan a ten year pro-
gram for pure scientific work in
American universities. With the can-
vas of only a few of the country's in-
dustrial leaders, more than. three
million dollars have already been sub-
scribed.
Regarding the .importance of the
movement, a glance at the history of
the laboratory and its accomplish-
ments will prove that any encourage-
ment of research will indubitably in-
crease our welfare. All industrial
progress seems based upon the scien-
tific principles discovered at some
time or other by science. As declared
by Dr. Vernon Kellogg, permanent
secretary of the National Research
council, in a list of illustrations upon
the subject, "Remove Galileo's dis-
covery that force is measured by the
product of mass by acceleration, and
the whole of modern material civiliza-
tion collapses like a house of cards,
because not a steam engine, dynamo,
or other dynamical device can be de-
signed without it."
In reality, the subscription of the
quota set for the present drive is just
compensation to pure science for the
afflictions visited upon it By commer-
cialism and the desire for education.
Thus, amends will be made for the
withdrawal of scientists to the indus-
trial laboratories by big business, and
to the classroom by the every increas-
ing demand of the country for educa-
tion.
Finland plans to shoot rum smug-
fglers on sight. Such action here wuld
depopulate some of the towns along
the Canadian border.
Fifty Indians invaded the Chicago
city hall the other day, looking for
the mayor. No, they weren't hunting
scalps-just publicity.

STE RLL
GUEST-
CONDUCTING
IS
REALLY NOTHING

AMUSIC
AND
DRAMA

i[i

J

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising.............. Joseph J. Finlp
Advertising............. Rud phBolte man
Advertising...............Wm. L. Mullin
Advertising.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation ............. ..James R. DePuy
Publiation.... ......Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts.......:............Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable,Jr. Frank Moshert
W. Carl Bauer F. A. ?Norquist
John H. Bobrink Loleta G. Parke.
S' anl-y 9. Coddington David Perrot
W. 1. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Win. C. Pusch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
Harold Holmes Margaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 1926
Night Editor-LEONARD C. HALL
THE MERRY MONTH OF MAYf
Of all the months of the year, the
30 lays that offer the greatest varietyj
of activity are in May. When the cx-
amnations start on May 29, which
alone is enough to make the month
N distinctive, the campus will have
weathered Mothers' day, Fathers' day,
Cane day, Swing out, the all-campus
elections, publications appointments,
the May Festival, numerous fraternity
and sorority dances, banquets of
various organizations, four Student
council Sunday convocations, Cap
night, the spring underclass games,-
enough to keep the average student
occupied every minute of the time.
Very enjoyable-all this spring!
activity. However, several distin-
guished men will speak in Natural
Science auditorium and elsewhere to
small audiences, while thousands
watch Michigan's baseball team; a
ew persons in addition to the new
Phi Beta Kappas will attend the Hon-
or convocation, while the campus as
a whole is playing politics in prepara-
tion for the elections; worth while
things will be said at the Sunday con-
vocations and the regular church
services of Ann Arbor, while the cam-I
pus sleeps off the effects of Saturday
night parties. It is important that the
true proportion of things should not
be forgotten in the rush of events
ordinarily closer to the heart of the
average student.I
And, again, the final bluebooks
start in the month of May. And in-
eligibility next fall will render void
all the results of the spring's elec-
tions, appointments, campaigns, et
cetera.
THE WALTER CAMP MEMORIAL
The name Walter Camp has long
stood for the highet ideals of sports-
manship and clean athletics. For
many years the "father of American
football" represented the finest type
of sportsman and the embodiment of
fair play itself in the minds of college
men. It is fitting that the memory of
this undeniably worthy athletic leader
be perpetuated in the proposed me-
morial to be erected at Yale univer-
sity in his honor. 1
The National Collegiate Athletic as-
sociation, arking in cooperation with3
Yale university, plan to erect a me-1

After a week of-four us-silence,
we return to take the reins of ROLLS.
Tiffin is busy on one or another of his
pressing extracurricular activities,
and so it was up to us to rally round.
* * *
Lee Nfants to run the story about
the slightly stewed individual who
announced his marriage to a news-
paper, and then, when he sobered up,
thought better of it and dashed into
the office, all but tearing his hair and
foaming at the mouth, and demanded
a retraction. Lee says the reason she
wants it to run is because a parallel
case happened at this office a day or
two ago, except that here it was the
fraternity brothers of the bridegroom
who announced the marriage. In the
original story the man didn't get his
retraction published. In the case in
Ann Arbor, however, the story wasn't
published, so, little boys and girls,
don't look over all the Woman's Pages
of the Daily to find the names of those
concerned. We did that until Lee told
us the story hadn't been allowed to
run.
* * *
A TLEGRAM FROM T lE FIELD
HOUSE
HERE IS A CHANCE FOR ALL
THOSE VIRILE MASCULINE HE-
MEN COMMA FOR THOSE THAT
POSSESS THAT INTANGIBLE COM-
MA INDEFINABLE SOMETHING
STOP WE ARE RUNNING A CON-
TEST TO DETERMINE WHAT
MEMBER OF THE STUDENT BODY
HAS THE GREATEST S. A. PAREN-
THSIS SEX APPEAL PAREN-
THESIS CLOSED STOP EVERYONE
IS ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THIS
STUPENDOUS CONTEST COMMA
WITH TilE EXCEPTION OF THE
ME31BERS OF THE ROLLS EDI-
TORIAL STAFF OR THEIR FAM-
ILIES STOP THE LIST OF PRIZES
IS ALSO STUPENDOUS AND WILL
BE ANNOUNCED IN THE NEAR FU-
TURE STOP NEW PARAGRAPH
SEND YOUR ENTRIES TO THE
CONDUCTOR OF THIS COLUMN
STOP.
NICK.
To the critics of ROLLS
Your letters and speeches casting
aspersions on the brand of humor in
this column have been received and
noted by us. We can only say this:
that if you hold those opinions about
ROLLS, it wuld be advisable for you
to hush them up and not go about
advertising them. ROLLS has never
gone in for Mass Production. Our
wit is aimed at the *intelligent few.
Your criticisms therefore brand you
as those belonging to the former
class.
Respectfully
The Editors.
*Not to be taken seriously.
* t *
One great difficulty confronts the
stadium builders: the bowl must con-
tain enough seats on the two ends to
make room for all the students. To
that end we have prepared the fol-
lowing engineering survey of the
problem and trust that it will greatly
aid the Board of Control.
THE REPORT dF ROLLS ENGINE-
ERING STAFF ON THE PRO-
POSED FOOTBALL BOWL:
(1) According to best practices, all
the students must be located behind
the goal posts. Therefore there must
be 18,363 seats in those sections of
the bowl, (allowing for the averages
grant of tickets to students).
(2) The angles will be what are
technically known (to our engineers)
as curves, which means that
(3) There will be only 11,777 seats
on the ends of the bowl.
(4)-SOLUTION: There will have
to be a second deck on each end of
the stadium.

i -Timothy Hay.
We forgot to mention one of the
most important events of the year.
After much balderdash about replac-
ing lost receipts and fraternities
please get their pictures in by such
and such a date, the 'Ensian has at
last come out. All things considered,
it's Q, pretty good number of the old
annual. Of course, our name was
misspelled in fifty per cent of the
places it appeared (one is fifty per
cent of two), but outside of that the
book is all right.
We are more than a little relieved
that the annual has at last been dis-
'tributed. We have been slightly an-
noyed at people calling the Daily
office (having failed to find any of the
Ensian boys at home) and audibly
wondering whether we could replace
their lost receipts, or still worse,
if they were seniors inquiring months
after the book had gone to press
whether they could make any addi-
tions to their activities cards. We
were always able to answer promptly,

THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ le-
cital in Hill auditorium at 4:151
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Commencement
Recital in Hill Auditorium at 8
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Flay Production
classes present Lewis Beach's "The
Goose Hangs High" in University hall
lat 8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: Margaret Anglin in
Somerset MIiugham's "Caroline" in
the Whitney theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT: Comedy Club presents
Qhnxvt N "VT vCal Tall"I

i
i_
(

GRAH1A 'SOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

Bernard Shaws "You 'eer len xev
in the Mimes theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
, , *
"YOU NEVER CAN TELL"
A review, by Robert Mansfield.
It is the longer Shavian comedy-
four acts with three sets, and it does
take an abominably long time to
change them. Furthermore, after the
audience had sat more or less patient-
ly until the curtain was fifteen min-
utes overdue, the orchestra filed in
and got under way. So endeth the ad-
verse comment.
Dorothy and Phillip Clandon, play-
ed by Phyllis Loughton and Warren
Parker, aided and abetted by Neal
Nyland as Valentine made the first act
what it was-rollicking comedy.
There was really excellent interpre-
tation of roles which are truly diffi-
cult. The twins are a pair of the
most attractive damnable young
nuisances known to the stage, and to
see the parts so effectively done by
amatuers is alone worth the price of
the show.
To apportion the praise among a
cast numbering a round dozen is no
light task when the whole thing was
so decently done. There are none of
the spectacular parts which made
"Great Catherine" and "Beggarman"
so admirably suited to the critic's
taste. Had any one character failed
to make the most of his or her part,
the performance would have been a
farce in another sense than was
originally intended.
There seems no way out of it but
to begin at the head of the cast in the
order of their appearance and give
each his share of the laurels. Neal
Nyland, Phyllis Loughton, and War-
ren Parker have been mentioned.
Margaret Eirich as the maid made a
nice little maid indeed. Lillian Bron-
son as Mrs. Clandon combined well a
"modern's" attitude and a mother's
solicitude. Margareet Effinger as
Gloria, "Nature's Masterpiece," made
love whole-heartedly when her moth-
er's training would permit. Mr.
Crampton, played by Paul eering,
was a grand old man-lovable, quick-
tempered and addicted to "Irish."
Robert Henderson in a smallish role
did his usual splendid bite William
Bishop as McComas was just as stiff
as his part required him to be. Sam-
,uel Bonnel and Harlan Christie as
Cook and Ko, not having a word to
say, must be considered together as
entertaining background. Appearing
only in the last act, and largely pre-
dominating therein, was Thomas
Denton as Bohun, the councilor-fine
work in a fine part. And that's that.
It is a "Pleasant Play" as the pro-
'groin would have it. It has a nicely
turned situation inithe legal question
of a plot against Crampton which
never deceives the audience at all, and
its love story is finely amusing. There
is no side-splitting humor-there is
instead the broad comedy of the twins
and the more mature cynicism o
Valentine's courtship and Mrs. Clan.
don's saccharine defense against his
advances toward her daughter.
"You Never Can Tell" will not have
the phenomenal run which "Great
Catherine" enjoyed. It is clever,
amusing, and well played, but it has
no Patiomkin. It is nice satire, play-
ed across a conventional stage-may
the campus enjoy it as I did, even to
the last laugh, which goes to old
Crampton.
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University organ-
ist, will present the following Organ
Recital this afternoon in Hill auditori-
um at four-fifteen o'clock:
Fantasie on "Twrgwyn"......Morgan
Cantabile....................Hagg
Chinoiserie.................Swinnen
Finale, Act II, "Madame Butter-
fly".-..................Puccini
Allegro vivace (Symphony V)....
....Widr
Minuet.-.................occherini
Cavatina........................Raft
Overture to "Rienzi"........Wagner
THE COMMENCEMENT RECITAL

The following program will be pre-
sented by six members of the grad-
uating class of the University School
of Music, supported by the University
Symphony orchestra, this evening in
Hill auditorium at eight o'clock:
Overture to "Cosi fan tutte"..Mozart
Piano Concerto, G minor (First
movement)..........Saint-Saens
Alice Manderbach
Aria "Mon coeur's ouvra a ta
voix" .............. Saint-Saens

I
i

66 M
You
No uncertaint
six to twelve
of other makes
'

:y
tin
s.

SKILLED REPAIRING
No
will want one for your finals.
about a Masterpen. It writes at touch-holds
nes as much ink, and will outwear several pens,
kid er's Pen Shoe

I Now mi.
w J

GRA MIS

24 HOUR SERVICE

I

SPECIAL
Each Tuesday and Wed-
nesday
SHAMPOO, MARCEL
AND
BOB CURL
$1.25
HILDA ARNST
Bertine Beauty Shoppe
1111 South iiversity Ave.
Phone 3839
{ PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ONTHE
CAMPS

- - -
Earn Extra Credits
During Summer Vacation
The change and recreation so necessary to every-
one are here combined with superior oppor-
tunity for educational advancement. Boating,
swimming, tennis, concerts, dramatic performan-
ces, inspiring lectures, etc.,.are allavailable.
Organized excursions to industrial, financial and art
centers of Chicago. Courses covering full year's work
in General Chemistry, Physics or Zolo9,for students
interested in Medicine, Dentistry or Engineering.
SUMMER
ON THE SHORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN
Opens June 21, 1926, and Includes: k
Graduate School Law School
College of Liberal Arts School of Music
School of Commerce School of Speech
School of Education School of Journalism
Send for FREE Booklet
Booklet, "Education Plus Recreation" describes the
courses of NORTHWESTERN UNIiVERSITY SUM-
MER SESSION and its recreational and educational
advantages.
Address WALTER DILL Scorr,President
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
604 University Hall EVANSTON, ILU.

I

SmmmORS

Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement.

Read The Daily

q
" Classified" ColuoIns

s

Change of Nngmn

{
r
i
l

{
r

Cause and effect: "No New Dress In
Five Years; Husband Rich."-head-
line.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. Thevnames of conmuni-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

Leo Kennedy and Reuel Kenyon have
taken over Jim Burke 's Whitmore Lake
Pavilion.

4'
y9
4
t"

WA NTE D--AN OPPONENTI
To the Editor:
Any member of the faculty who is
opposed to the entry of the United
States into the League of Nations,
and is willing to defend his position
in a public debate, is requested to
make himself known to the Editor
of The Daily, who has an opponent at
hand.
-A Faculty Man.

Opening Dance Thursday, April 29
Dancing Tues., Thurs., Fri., Sat.
Jiusic' by
Reuci Kenyon and his University Ramblers

EDITORIAL COMMENT
THE DOCTRINE OF BEING UNPRE-
PARED
(The Kansas City Star)
A person who held that the exist-
ence of police departments was an en-
couragement to crime or that the ex-
istence of fire departments tended to
increase the number of fires would be
regarded as illogical and foolish. Yet
there are some persons who seem to
reason that war is hastened just to
the extent that any moves toward na-
tional defense are made. To these a
little military training in the schools
and colleges is certain to breed the
war spirit; the citizens' camps con-1
ducted for a limited number of young
men each summer smell of militarism,
and the roar of the cannon is the in-
evitable echoof marching feet..
If the philosophy of these individ-
uals had been followed there would
not now be any question of national
defense, for the nation itself would
not exist. If it had prevailed, as un-

-I

Finest foods, tastily
prepared; immediate

service--alA-ways!

.Ye t

the lowest in town
a

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