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April 27, 1926 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-27

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Y

5k i~an

att

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

VOL XXXVI. No. 152 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1926 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ENATE APPROVES
BELGIUM WAR DEBT NIN poug

ACTION
BUT

COMES
BRISK
UPPER

AFTER. BRIEF
DEBATE IN
HOUSE

COMMISSION ACTS
Directs Communication With France
On Unacceptable Provisions Of
French Debt Proposals
(By Associated Press)
'WASHINGTON, April 26.-As the
negotiations for the settlement of
France's four billion dollar war debt
proceeded today, the Senate gave;
overwhelming approval to the agree-
imient with Belgium for the funding of
its $417,780,000 war obligation.t
The American Debt commissionr
Pound some of the major provisions1
of the French proposals unacceptable
and directed Chairman Mellon to.
communicate this decision to Ambas-t
sador Berenger, who is representingt
France in the renewed negotiations.7
Meanwhile, the commission willt
meet tomorrow with the commissiont
from Jugo-Slavia in an effort to1
reach an agreement on the debt or
that country. The negotiations will
be taken up where they were left off
last fall and the Americans are hope-
Iul of an early settlement.
Senate action on the Belgium debt
agreement came after a brief, but
brisk debate during which Senator
Reed, Democrat, Missouri; Howell, Re-1
publican, Nebraska, and others in-
sisted that the debt commission was
"saddling billions of dollars of inter- I
est charges on the American people
through the settlement with foreign
nations."
The vote for approval was 55-20, an
even larger margin than the Italian
agreement received last week, and
came after the Senate had rejected,f
21, an amendment \by Senatort
Iaivell which would have required
Belgium to issue interest bearing
bonds in the amount of the annual
payments which they have agreed to
make on account of principal and in-
torest.
The vote of the Senate completed;f
jiiislative action in both countries
and the agreement will come into full{
force as soon as President Coolidge'
has signed the bill of ratification.
The temporary stumbing block in
the French negotiations includes the I
proposal that France pay ony $25,000,-
000 annually at first. The American
comnmission asked the French ambas-
sador to make a better proposal and'
he has communicated with his gov-s
0rnment.
NE W SCHEDULES
ON BUS LINES
NOW IN EFFECTj
Changes in time schedules and par-
t1al re-routing of the lines of the Peo-
ple's Motor Coach company took ef-
fet Sunday morning. Elimination was
miade of the Packard-Huron route, the
P'ckard section being absorbed in the
new consolidated run, which will in-
clude Miller avenue and Broadway.
,usses previously running on Hu-
street will follow Washington,
J'pching Jackson avenue through Re-
7ena boulevard. This route will run
east to Main and State streets, con-
tiuing over the regular Washtenaw
route. Coaches will leave Austin and
Washtenaw avenues on the hour and
every twelve minutes thereafter. A
twenty-minute service will be operat-
ed on Sunday.
The Burns Park-Hospital line will re-
main unchanged. The new consoli-
dated line, on the Packard section,
will maintain service from Main and
Washington streets, to Packard, Pack-
ard to Morton place to Lincoln ave-
nue, to Granger avenue to Packard
and return by the same route.
The time schedule issued by the
company indicates a 12 minute ser-
vice on the Washington-Washtenaw
route, and 10-minute service on the
Burns Park-Hospital and Packard-
Miller-Broadway route.
PHILADELPHIA.-One of the least

known sections of the spectrum has!
been investigated by Prof. K. T.
Compton, well known physicist, and1
C. H. Thomas of Princeton university.1
iOur WeatherMan I

Seniors Prepare
Party Lists For
Mock Elections
Despite the fact that Harry G. Mes-
ser, president of the senior class, has
announced that there will be no pri-
maries before the senior mock elec-
tion at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow in Nat-
ural Science auditorium, various fac-
tions are already organized and ready
to present a list of candidates when
the nominations are declared open, it
was learned yesterday. An anti-to-
bacco league is being organized among
the men, while the pro-side of the is-
sue is being taken by a group insti-
tuted by the women.
Seniors who have been on the cam-
pus five years or more are taking a
stand for the honor system, and indi-
cations are that this faction will have
several successful candidates in the
election. Men connected with the
Union during their University career
have been meeting since a fortnight
ago, and the results of tomorrow's
vote is expected to show the feeling
about several allegations relative to
the men's club this year.
Soon after last week's announce-
ment, a Put-the-stadium-near-the-cam-
pus group completed its party plat-
form and the majority of the ind-
pendent candidates immediately joined
that faction. Twenty-nine members of
the class of '26 have qualified for the
150-different-dates-a-year club insti-
tuted last year, and it is in this group
that the women are looking for sup-
ports.
HEALTH ATHO RITY
WILL SPEAK HERE
Sir Arthur Newslolme Of London To
Gve Series Of Lectures From
May 12 to 14
SUBJECTS ANNOUNCED
Sir Arthur Newsholme, of London,
said to be one of the greatest authori-
ties on public health problems, will
give a series of three lectures here
from May 12 to 14, according to an
announcement made yesterday by Prof.
John Sundwall, of the public health
and hygiene department.
The subjects of the speeches have
been announced as "The Limitations
of Liberty asrRelated to Communal
Life'" "The Growth of Social Insur-
ance in Britain," and "The History of
the Growth of the Preventive Idea in
M\edi cinie."
For many years Sir Arthur was head
of the Great Britain health service.
He is especially noted, however, as
an authority on national health in-
surance and he will deal with this
topic in one of his lectures here.
He is the author of a great many
books on health subjects, the most
recent of which is "The Ministry of
Health in Great Britain." He is also
a frequent contributor to medical
journals.
Sir Arthur obtained his medical de-
gree from the school of medicine at
University college, London, in 1880.1
He lectured for many years at both
Oxford and Cambridge universities.
In 1898 he was made a fellow of the
royal college of physicians.
From 1922 to 1923 he was in this
country as a visiting professor at the
Johns Hopkins school of hygiene.
FRESHMANLAW CLASS
TO HER JUDGE MUPHY
First year Law students will hold
theirannual smoker and get-to-gether
at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in the
lounge room of the Lawyers' club. The

smoker will conclude activities on the
freshman law calendar for the year.
Judge Frank Murphy, presiding
judge, of the Detroit Recorders court,
will give a short address. Judge
Murphy graduated from the Law
school in 1914 and though only 29
years of age is of recognized standing
in his field.
Faculty members will be present.
It is urged by Charles F. White, '29L,
that members of the freshman class
pay their dues before the smoker.
Debating Groups
To Meet Tonight
Debating teams of Portia and
Athena societies will meet tonight in
the second debate of the year. A sil-
ver loving cup will be given as a per-
manent possession to the organization

i
i
i

SH09IS'111 E A, T EFFE CTS IOF SPORTS
MVSOLES5 Nr n LSPESENTED
LEASIN TO UNITSEeNestngation to determine the
exact effects" of sports onI
SD schools and colleges is being H
made by the Carnegie Founda--
t Dr. Howard J. Savage, who
)IA.JORITY OF ('OMMITTEENIEN | is in charge of the inquiry, said AN)RFWS BEIEVES PROPOSALS
RC1.10DHAFC1lIYtodlay.
JE(COM1MENI HA LF (ENTI'IY | Dr. Savage quietly starte an ESSENTIAL TO EFFECTIVE
CONTRACT ?OF PLANT I investigation last January fol- j ENFORCEMENLT
lowing charges that intercollegi- -
PROPOSAL IS FILED I ate football leads to dishonesty, l WETS ARE AROUSED
d-inking, and neglect of studies
Coiisideraiion Of Measure By Senate made in the report of a commit-
s Postponed Despie Ruling tee of college professors publish- Measure Delegating Blanket Control
Iy VIosoe espite Rulinged in the current bulletin of the To Official Believed Hopeless
By Tice-President 'es Am ican Association of Univer- By Both Factions
(By Associated Press) sity Professors.
(f(ByAssociaatddPress))I
WASHINGTON, April 26.-Lease of WAHNT (By Associated Press)
Muscle Shoals for 50 years to the Ala- WASHINGTON, April 26.-Another
bama and 12 associated Southern batch of administration bills designed
power companies was recommended :to strengthen the Federal arm of pro-
today by a majority of the joint con- hibition enforcement was 'presented
gressional committe appointed to ne- Ttoday to Congress.
gotiate for the operations of the gov- A They supplement measures recently
ernment's properties by private in- introduced and are regarded by Gen.
terests. In reaching its findings, the jILincoln C. Andrews, in charge of pro-
committee split three ways. Four Picked Tri 'ill ' hibition enforcement, as essential to
memers favored the power com- aeherehursday afull effort by the government to dry;
pany's, while Senator Hefflin, Demo- For Alontreal Accompanied By up the liquor supply.
crat, voted for the American Cyanide Professor Hollister Chairman Cummins of the Senate
company's bid and Representative ---.judiciary committee, became sponsor
James, Republican, Michigan, opposed MEET LIVERPOOL FIRST for the measures, which deal with re-
both proposals. The majority report view of liquor permits, the search and
was signed by Representative Deneen, -'seizure of ships within the 12 mile
Senator Backett, Republican, Ken- ! Michigan's international debate limit, and the employment of retired
tucky, Representative Morine, Repub- team composed of W. W. King, '27L, army, navy, marine corps, and coast
liean, Pennsylvania, and Represent- Gerald White, '27, and E. R. Gomberg, guard officers, and men by the prohi
ative Quinn, Democrat, Mississippi. '27, has been scheduled to debate the bition unit, and authorized customs
A bill to authorize a lease to the University of Liverpool trio May 10, collectors to refuse to register crafts
power company was filed in the Sen- Ithe day the team arrives in England, they believe are designed as rum run-
ate and the House with the accom- a letter received yesterday from Lon- ners.
panying reports. No discussion was don informed Prof. Thomas C. True- One section of one of the bills which
provoked in the House, but Chairman blood, of the pubicspeaking depart- would give the prohibition commis-
Norris, of the Senate agricultural m ent. The letter stated that the de- sioner blanket authority to issue regu-
committee, advocate of government ( bate with Oxford has been set for lations for the enforcement of the Vol-
ommittee, avoucate hos, govermen 1ay 13 and for Cambridge May 18, but stead act aroused wet senators who
oertion to Muse Slsp mded an his the dates for the other debates on the said they would oppose it with all the
committee. He was blocked by Sen- itinerary have not been fixed as yet. power at their command. Even some
ator Hefflin, Democrat, Alabama, who The team will leave here Thursday of the dry senators said that such a
sought to have it placed on the Se- accompanied by Prof. R. D. T. Hol- proposal would have little chance of
soute tohves it placed one aien- ulister, of the public speaking depart- getting through Congress since it im-
ate calender so it could be called up ment, and will sail Saturday on the posed entirely too much authority on
for consideration at any time. Vice- , S. . Regina from Montreal. Most of
President Dawes ruled in favor of l.e egia iro Egnrel . the the treasury.
Senator Hefflin, but Senator Norris 1the debates England will be on the General Andrews said that provision
kept the bill off the calender by hav- question: "Resolved: that this House was not intended as a "joker" as some
ing it laid on the table until tomor- views with alarm the entrance of wet senators said, and was practically
women into the learned professions the same as the provision in the ex-
Leaders plan to call the bill up in; d.isting law except that it might be a
the House Wednesday, when Represen- The only opportunity Michigan stu- little broader in terms. The section
tative James is expected to make a dents will have to hear the interna- reads as follows:
point of order that it violated thereso-tional debate team debate will be to- "The (prohibition) commissioner,
lution creating the committee which o night at 7:30 on fourth floor Angell with the approval, of the secretary of
stipulated that Muscle Shoals was to hall, when the trio will meet a picked i the treasury, may issue such regula-
be dedicated primarily to national de- { team from Adelphi House of Repre- ;tions as may be necessary to carry out
fense for the production of ammuni- sentatives in a practice debate. The the provisions of the national prohi-
tion in the time of war and agricul- above question will be debated.The bition act."
turne in time of peace. The bill does Adelphi debaters will take the nega- The new prohibition measures will
neither, he asserts, but is "a power tive of the question. ( be referred to the Senate judiciary
proposition disguised as a fertilizer sub-committee, which' has held hear-
proposal." ' sn s 'gs on a number of modification pro-
With a fight expected in both the Iaposals sponsored by wet senators as
House and Senate on the committee's well as the Goff bill designed to put
recommendation, leaders expressed A ppearance O additional teeth into the Volstead act.
doubt whether there would be legisla- Chairman Harreld said the sub-com-
tion at this session definitely dispos- UCa pu S "oy mittee would meet in about 10 days
ing of the problem which has vexed jto consider all of the measures. Ther
Congress for several years. _ 1 is little poability that any of the wet
_"____"__ I Michigan's 1926 'Esian will make jhills will be reported, but some sena-
} I its first appearance on the campus ati tors said today that there was equally
11TTI EXPLAINS c) o'clock this morning, at which time as little probability that any of the
S YRIAN AlEFFECT the oadal distribution will egin it "nistration" "easures would be
file official diaryti,000iordersgillaIpassed this session. Besides the bills
UPON ErA S I I be biae. eal 00 orders willIto strengthen the Volstead act there
V b filled. 'is another bill to create a prohibi-
--To insure orderly distribution, two tion bureau in the treasury under a
Dr. Phillip K. Hitti, formerly of the line.; will be formed outside the base- commissioner. This is expected to be
American university of Beirut, Syria, passed tomorrow by the House.
and now a member of the history staf ment door of the Library; one for re-G
of Princeton university, spoke last ceipts under 1,000 andl complimentary I
night in Natural Science auditorium copies, and the other for those nuni- COMEDY CLUB)
on "Syrian Contributions to Western bered above 1,000. WILLE PRESENT
Europeani Civilization." Distribution will continue from 9 to ~
Dr. Hitti mentioned the three chan- 5 o'clock daily for the next two weeks. SHA W 'S PLAY
nels through which the Syrian infilu- According to the contracts those who
ence has made itself felt on European do not call for their 'Ensian durin
civilization, which are, through Spain, 4 this period will forfeit them. As its 41st annual production, Com-
through Sicily, and through Syria.I The size of the 1926 Michiganensian j edy club will present-George Bernard
These three influences are all due to has been somewhat reduced as con- Shaw's "You Never Can Tell" in the
the rise and expansio of Islam abo i pared to the issues of other years, Mimes theater at 8:15 o'clock tonight.
700 A. D. Previous to this, the Ger-j but the arrangement has not been ma- The play will also be given on Wednes-
man tribes, which were of Asiatic ori- terially altered. The B. M. 0. C. sec- day and Thursday nights of this week.
gin, had made themselves felt in tion, a feature of previous issues, has The tickets which may be obtained

Europe. been dropped, because these men re-I at the box office of the Mimes thetr
Through Spain came the greatest ceive due mention in the sections de- I are priced at 50 and 75 cents. This
philosopher of the era, which was voted to their activities. is the first time in the history of the
Averroez. His works and translations The special feature of the humor club that tickets for its annual pro-
of Aristotle into Latin were the stand- section is "The Rover Boys In Ann ductions, which have hitherto been
ards of all universities in Europe un- Arbor" or "Where Commerce and Edu- given at the Whitney theater, have
til the 15th century. The Greek cul- I cation Meet." Several cartoons add to been reduced to popular prices. How-
ture came to Europe in this wvay; first j the attractiveness of the section. The ever, since the play has never been
from Greek to Syriac, and then from general arrangement of pages in the ; produced for three nights, and also
Syriac into Latin. body of the book is based on the due to the increased facilities of pro-
The outstanding medical contribut- French border plan. duction in the Mimest theater, the re-
tion was through Sicily, which the duction could be made.
Arabs had also conquered. Avicenna "You Never CanTell" is a farce of
was the father of all Arab medicine J QDFI IIY i R the type that is typical of Shaw and is
and his works on the subject were being prepared under the direction of
also the standards of all European Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the engine-
universities as far north as BelgiumI ering English department. Professor
In Naples, also, Frederick established S lll O U llI Nelson has also designed the scenery
the first university in Europe. which is being painted by Otto Schil-
Final opportunity to order an- 1er, master carpenter of the Mimes
nouncements an(J invitations for Com- theater. The cast of "You Never Ca
mnencement on June 14 and other Tell" includes many who have taker
SCOTTORTU N FROM senior functions will be given from 9 part in other campus productions*o
until 4 o'clock today in the office ad- the year, including "Great Catherine,"
t R UINjacent to the lobby of Alumni Me- I "Beggarman," "Engaged" and "Why

Mt. Clemens High
Sends Delegation
Of Seniors Here
In line with the policy instituted by
President Clarence Cook Little for
"humanizing" education, and of mak-
ing easier the transition period from
high school to college, 21 seniors from
Mt. Clemens high school will visit the
University today.
The group will meet at 9 o'clock in
the registrar's office, where they will
meet Registrar Ira M. Smith, and
Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of Students.
It is'expected they, will also meet
President Little and Prof. William A.
Frayer, of the history department,
chairman of the committee which is
drafting plans for "Freshman Week"
During the forenoon the students
will meet deans of the various col-
leges, and instructors in the several
lines of study in which they have ex- I
pressed an interest. At 10:45 o'clockI
the group will be conducted on at
tour through the general library, atE
11:30 o'clock, girls in the party willt
meet Jean Hamilton, dean of women.t
The group will be under the direction
of Prin. Philip C. Lovejoy, '16. t
Saginaw high school students willt
visit the University, May 10.t
I!E
LARON TO SPEAK
ON FATHERS' DAY1'
Ex-Minnesota. Congressman, '94L, Willt
Deliver Main Address; Ticket t
Sale Starts TomorrowI
DEAN BATES TO PRESIDE
Former Congressman 0. J. Larson,
'94L, of Duluth, Minn., has been en-
gaged as the principal speaker of thet
fourth annual Fathers' Day banquet,<
which will be held at the Union Sat-E
urday, May 15, it was announced yes-t
terday by Paul Starrett, '27A, chair-'
man of the Fathers' Day committee of
the Union. It was also stated that
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school has been chosen to act as toast-E
master. ~
Mr. Larson is at the present time
one of the most prominent attorneys
in Duluth and has lectured extensive-
ly since his retirementfrom Congresst
a year ago. During the World War
he was one of three Americans to be
decorated by the Republic of Finland
for services rendered that country, re-
ceiving the recognition with Herbert
Hoover, secretary of commerce, and
Julius Barnes, former president of the
United States Chamber of Commerce.
While in attendance at the Univer-
sity, Mr. Larson was particularly ac-
tive in state politics. He also held
the heavyweight boxing championship
of the campus. He began his law
practice in Calumet following his
graduation and was prosecuting attor-
ney of Houghton county for six years
before nioving to Duluth. In 1911, he
noninated o. Charles S. Osborn of
Michigan for that office. Mr. Larson
spoke at his class reunion here two
years ago.
The Fathers' Day program will open
with attendance at the Cap Night cere-
monies Friday, May 14. On Saturday
sons will conduct their fathers about
the campus and probably attend the
I football scrimmage in the afternoon
which will close the spring practice.
A short program of entertainment isI
1 being planned for the banquet in ad-
dition to the main address and re
marks from Dean Bates.
Tickets for the banquet will be plac-
ed on sale tomorrow at the main desk
of the Union. They are priced at $1.50
for the sons and the same for the
fathers.
Many fraternities are planning

house parties. for fathers the same
week-end.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
SENIORS TO HEAR RIPLEY

BUCKEYES TRU NCE
VARSITY NI NE,083;
I1NFIELD CRUMBLES
WALTERS GIVES BUT SEVEN IIITS;
EIGHT MISPLAYS MAR
SUTPPORT
ERRORS COST GAME
Both Teams Scoreless Until Fourth
Innling; Michigan Scores Come In
Sixth And Seventh Frames
Special to The Daily
COLUMBUS. April 26.-Michigan's
nine which has been playing classy
baseball since the season opened and
which had little difficulty in downing
the Purdue team Saturday, broke
down completely today when its in-
field failed to function and lost to the
Ohio State team by a 9 to 3 score.
Walters did splendid work on the
mound for the Wolverines and held
the Buckeyes to seven hits, but his
fine pitching was to no avail when 8
errors were marked up against the
Michigan infield. Neville and Fried-
man each muffed two balls and Loos,
Wilson and Kubicek each made an er-
ror. It is likely the Michigan outfit
will oppose Syracuse Friday with a
new infield.
For the first three innings neither
team was able to cross the home plate.
Ohio cut loose in the fourth frame and
tallied two runs. The Wolverines
were unable to score in the fifth,
neither were they able to brace up
and check the onslaught of the Colum-
bus team for the locals came back
strong in their half of the innings and
scored three more runs.
Michigan went into the sixth frame
with the score 5-0. The jinx seemed
to depart when the Ann Arborites
commenced to slam the ball to far
corners of the lot, and it looked as
though Ohio State would be compelled
to take a decided brace if they wished
to maintain the lead. The Michigan
rally was shortlived, however, and the
visitors had to be satisfied with two
runs, making the score 5-2. Ohio fail-
ed to register in their half of the inn-
ing.
The visitors again started out the
seventh frame with - a bang and suc-
ceeded in climbing one run closer to
the locals. But it was is Ohio's half
of the inning that all hopes were
blasted for the Ann Arbor team, for
the Buckeyes displayed real skill with
the bat and sent four runners across
the home plate dues to a complete
breakdown in ithe Michigan infield.
That ended the scoring for although
the visitors did brace considerably in
the field they were unable to use the
bats effectively.
Jablonowski was credited with the
longest hit of the game, a three base
hit. Wilson made a double.
Box score:'

Box Seq
Loos, ss ...........
Wilson, 1b.........
Lange, If .........
Edgar, c..........
Mfller, rf.........
Jablonowski, p.
tKubicek, 2b .....
Friedman, 3b......
Walters, p........
Neville, 3b........

core
wan
AB
4 1
3
3
4
4
3
3
4
1

R
Q
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

H;
0
3
0
0:
1
1
1
1
0
0

PO
3
5
,
10
2
1
2
0
0
0

A
2:
0
1;
0
0
0..
2
2
0
6

7
:l
,
3
1
B
1

Totals ...........32 3 7 24
Ohio State

0
0
0
.0
1
1
1
a
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
z

Sommers, 2b......
McLaughlin, rf....
Karon, ss........
Dempsey, cf.....
-Farbert, if.........
Trescel, 3b.......
Leo, lb ............
Sloteman, p.......
Mackey,c.
Totals.........3

AB R IT
4 112
5 2 0
J 1 1..
4' 1 0'.
4 1 1.,
1 0
4 1 0.
4 0 2
38 9 7

PO
4
0a
0
a,3,
4;
0'
15
0.
1
27

A
"1
0
3.
0
0.
5
0
2
1
12

Charles M. Ripley, of the General
Electric company, Schenectady, N. Y.,
will give an illustrated lecture upon
f "What Electricity Has Done for Civi-
s lization" at 10 o'clock this morning
f in room 348 of the West Engineering
- building before seniors of the electri-
r cal engineering department.
y Mr. Ripley was a close friend of the
- late Dr. Charles P. Stienmetz, and for
s five years was a frequent visitor at
'the home and laboratory of the elec-
trical wizard. He has written a num-
f ber of books, among them being "Ro-
mance of a Great Factory" and "Life
y in a Large Manufacturing Plant." The

Two base hits-Wilson.
Three base hits-Jablonowski.
Home runs-None.
Sacrifice hits-Wilson, 2, Lange, 2.
Bases on balls-Walters, 1, Slotman,
2.
Struck out-Walters, 5, Slotmon.1.
Wild pitch-Walters.
Umpires-Sheler and Bechtel.
OIL LAW AUTHORITY. .
WILL LECTURE, HERE
James A. Veasey, of Tulsa, Okla.,
considered one of the few authorities
on the law of oil and gas, will give a
series of lectures on that subject to
students of the Law school starting
. A -- ' T T.,. ,. ... - - - -,,t , ~ _.

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