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April 25, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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P'AGE SIX

THF. MTC'HTC.A j r)ATI V

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Cleveland

Hands

Dfetroit

hird

Defeat

In

11

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TYG ERS' LOSE 4-3
BESPITE_14 HIT!
:ulke Sewell Sends lit Winning Rui
'Witlh His Second Hit; Cobbuien
look Early Lead
TRIBE GETS 10 HITS
CLEVELAND, 0., April 24.-TrIn
Speaker's tribe of Indians retainer
their league leading position and mad(
it a clean sweep of their three gam(
series with the Detroit Tigers by de
feating the Cobbmen in an 11 inning
game by a 4-3 score behind the able
pitching of Emil (Dutch) Levsen, whc
made his first start of the year. Lev-
sen held the Tigers to but three runs
despite their 14 hits.
Detroit tallied single runs in th
third and fourth innings:. In the third
a pass to Warner and O'Rourke's be-
ng hit by a pitched ball, followed by
"'othergill's single, scored one run. In
the fourth, Whitehill's triple past
Speaker registered Tavener, who had
reached first on a single.
Cleveland evened the count in the
fifth round with two runs, but the
Tigers took the lead in the sixth on
Bassler's timely single after Jamieson
made a muff of Blue's liner. The In-
dians tied the count in their half of
the seventh and won out in the 11th
on Burns' infield hit, Mullen's error
and L. Sewell's long hit to left.
Box score:

[I
S;
e

11
MAJOR LEAGUERS Poor Position Y4~~~~
~It

Other Games
National League
R:
Philadelphia ... 002 000 042-8
Boston........400 010 200-7
Philadel hia- Mann, Pierce;
loughby, B13ccht, and Wilson.
Boston - Genewich, # Cooney,
Taylor.
R]
St. Louis .......410 101 002-9
Pittsburgh .....000, 100 002-3
St. Louis-Rhein and O'Farrell.
Pittsburgh-Kremer, Sheehan,
Smith.

H E
11 4
11 4'
Wil-
and
H i
13 2
4 0
and

i

M JO tl9G9[S rPsition
Handicaps
LOW ITV BATTIN&RMile .Relay Four

i

FHE
TANDINGS

('By
CHICAGO,

Associated Pressi
April 24.-The

major

R H F
New York......000 000 000-1 4 1
Brooklyn ......010 000 001-2 7 2
New York-Barnes, Fitzimons, and
Hartley.
Brooklyn-Petty and Hargreaves.

D'etroit
AB

Warner, 3bT.........3
Mullen, 3b.......... 0
O'Rourke, 2b .....5
Wingo, If.......... 3
Fothergill, cf.....
-eilmaun, rf....... 5
Blue, lb ..........5
'Tavener, ss ....... 5
Bassler, c .........4
1Manion, c........1
Whitehill, p.........5
xNeun .............0
yManush ...........1

R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
0
2
1
1
3
2
2
0
2
0
1

Po
3
0
1
3
2
2
17
1
1
2
0
0
0

A
2
0
7
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0

U
I
0
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
0
0

Totals..... , ......42' 3 14*32 13 1
*Two out when winning run scored.
xRan for Bassler in ninth.
yBatted for Warner in ninth.

Cinneinnati, Chicago, no game--rain.
e_
American League
R H E
T Chicago ........100 210 300-7 12 11
St. Louis ......000 200 200-4 10 31
t Chicago - Thomas, Edwards, and
Crouse.
St. Louis-VanGilder, Jonnard, Bol-
en, and Schang.
R H E
Washington ... .000 100 000-1 10 1
Philadelphia ... 003 000 100-4 10 3j
Washington-Bush and Severeid.
Philadelphia-Quinn and Cochrane. 1
R H E
Boston .........000 100 000-1 4 4
New York .....110 030 130-9 12 0
Boston-Wiltse, Lundgren, and Gas-
ton.
New York-Shocker and Collins.
BASETAL NOT TOO
STRENUOUS -NAISMITK
LAWRENCE, Kans., April 24.-Bas-
ketball appears from the sidelines to
be a game that progresses with breath-
less speed, a gruelling contest to wear
out quickly even the most seasoned
player.
From the starting whistle to the,
final gun, however,. it hasbeen found f
there is as much time for rest as for I
activity for the team as a whole, while
for the individual player there is twice
as much time for rest as for activity.
These conclusions have been determ-
ined by Dr. James Naismith, inventor
of the game, who has made detailed
studies of Missouri Valley conference
basketball games for the last two
years.
With stop watch in hand, Dr. Nai-
smith has watched individual players
and teams as a whole, both in the uni-
versity and high school contests, and
he is convinced that basketball is not
too streuous, even for high school
youths.
One, of the most strenuous, games in
the Missouri Valley conference in
years was the Kansas-Nebraska- con-
test of 1925, which decided the Valley
basketball championship. . From that.
game, Mr. Naismith obtained these
results:
Time elapsed during the game 69
minutes; time taken out, and other
rests, five times for a total of 9 min-
utes, 51 seconds; average rest period,
1:58. There were 35 relaxation per-
iods, as when a goal was made, a foul
called, a held ball, or ball out of
bounds. These periods varied from 4
seconds to 50 seconds, the average be-
ing 17.7 seconds.

league pcnfant races are under way
with all the fervor of other years butj
the hitting.I
Whether the light hitting is tempor-
ary and due to the irregular train-
ing of the spring or the result of the
"slower" ball in use in the two big
time circuits, to be reflected through-
out the year, will be shown as the
season progresses.
The fact stands, borne out by cold1
figures, that the batting so far has
been phenomenally light. Some few
major leaguers have piled up 'un-
usually high early-season averages in
their stick work but the teams, as
teams, are hitting pretty well down in
the column as averages go for this
stage of the races.
Leading National hitters in six or
more games: Hornsby, St. Louis, .438;
Wheat, Brooklyn, .417; Heathcote, Chi-
cago, .391; Johnston of Boston, .389;
Sand of Philadelphia, .387; Bressler of
Cincinnati, .3$5; Leach, Philadelphia.
.370; Frisch of New York, .364; Four-
nier, Brooklyn, .t64; Felix of Brook-1
lyn, .360.
Leading American hitters in six or
more games: Bennett, of St. Louis,
.600; Flagstead of Boston, .516; Dykes,
Philadelphia, .485; Spurgeon, Cleve-
land, .484; Collins, New York, .409;
Tavener of Detroit, .409; Fothergill,l
Detroit, .407; Summa, Cleveland, .400;
Dugan of New York, .390; Burns ,
Cleveland, .390.
Cornell, Pennsylvania, Syracuse,'
Columbia, Annapolis, California,aBos-
ton Tech., Washington and Wisconsinj
will be represented in the annual crew
regatta at Poughkeepsie which will
take place on June 28.t
The national rifle shoot at Camp
Perry may be abandoned this year. I

Specia to The Daily
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., April 24.
-At the very start, two runners
stumbled in front of the Wol-
verine runner, and 1 eiser al-
though running a strong r.:, fit-'
ished about 12 yards be:indl
Georgetown. Mueller took the
baton in next to last place, and
passed two men on the back
stretch, only to lose ground again
in being forced to run to th wall
to pass Herrnstein.
The latter, running in third
place put on steam to catch the
flying Georgetown runner, who
was now about 15 yards in the
lead. The effort was too much
for the Michigan runner who lost
ground as his teammates in run-
ning wide on the turn in order
to reach his man in fourth lane.
To complicate matters, the Penn-
sylvania runner stumbled in front
of HIerrnstein just before he pass-
ed to Feinsinger with the former
receiving a slight injury from a
flying spike.
Each of the first three leading
Wolverines having made up some
distance, Feinsinger running anch-
or, took up the impossible task of
catching Georgetown and Holy
Cross. who were 20 yards ahead.
Despite their having started in
tenth position, the Wolverine
quartet finished in fifth place.
Coach Farrell was far from dis-
appointed in their performance in
view of the handicap of their posi-
tion. The Michigan team was
clocked in 3 minutes, 24 seconds
and a fraction.
Despite the fact that only two men
are left from last year's squad, Ohio
State university is looking forward to
a strong tennis team this year, Cap-
tain Seymour and Roger Tracy are
the two veterans.
Patron ize Daily Advertisers--Adv.

American League
W. L. Pc
Cleveland................7 2 .77
New York ...............7 3 .70
Washington...6 5 .54
Chicago..................6 5 .54
Detroit ............. 4 5 .44
Boston...................4 6 .40
Athletics.4 7 .36
St. Louis8.................3 3 .27
Today's Games
Chicago at Detroit.
Cleveland at St. Louis.
Boston at Washington.
Athletics at New York.

t.
8
0o
5
4
0
i4
z3

MEET FROM MI1
Playing in a cold north wind which
at times assumed the proportions of
a gale, the Michigan tennis team'
overwhelmingly defeated Michigan
State college yesterday afternoon on
the concrete courts at Ferry field, an-
nexing every match to chalk up a 7-0
victory. Rain which fell earlier in the
day made the clay courts unfit forI
play, and several times during the
afternoon threatened to stop the
matches.
Capt. Earl Krickbam won his first
test of the season from Lawrence who!
yesterday defeated Detroit's city cham-
pion. The score was 6-3, 4-6, 7-5
coming after a hard and tedious play
in which accuracy was impossible.
Lawrence used a defensive game to
great advantage at times and worriedl
Krickbaum with overheads butl
"Krick's" superior stroking prevailed.I
Dick Crane played an excellentl
game in vanquishing Pierson 6-3, 6-2.
He easily outplayed-his opponent and
was very steady.
Leighton Stephens, in the numberl
three position, snatched a win from
Captain Stouffer in three hard sets,
15-7, 6-4, 6-3. His playing was erratic,
especially in the first set, but he man-
aged to rally, and captured the match
in good form after nearly an hour and'
a half of play.
Jim Vose smashed his way to a hard
three set victory over Iendershott,

National League
W.
New York ............... 7
St. Louis ................. 7
Cincinnati ................ 5
Chicago................5
Phillies .................. 6
Brooklyn..................4
Boston 3
Pittsburgh...............3
Today's Games
N~ew York at Brooklyn.
Pittsburgh at Chicago.
St. Louis at Cincinnati.

L.
3
4
4
4
5
5
8
s

Pct.
.700
.636
.556
.556
.545
.414
.273
.273

Only three games scheduled.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

lkq~m mmN NEamWlE0M,,.,0

" TENNIS RACKETS RESTRUNG.
U IN OUR OWN STORE

:I

in

LET US GET YOUR RACKET READY FOR SPRING

Cleve land
AB

R

Jamieson, if ........5 0
Spurgeon, 2b....... 5 0
Speaker, of......... 5 0
J. Sewell,ss........5 0
Burns, 11).......... 5 2
Summa, rf......... 4 1
Lutzke, 3b......... 5 1
L. Sewell, e....... 4 0
Levsen, p .......... 3 0
Totals ...........41 4
Detroit 001 101 000
Cleveland 000 002 010
Summaries.
Two base hits-Blue (2),
Burns, Lutzke, J. Sewell.

R[FIRST TENNIS
CHIGA.N STATE, 7-
the State number four man. After an ,
indifferent start when he lost the
first set 3-6, Vose settled down, an'd
after leading 5-0, took the second set
6-2. He tired in the final set but
had plenty to win at 6-4.
Irwin Olian, in the fifth position,
played well in his first Varsity, match__
and he smothered Bentley in less than
40 minutes. The score was 6-1, 6-2,
and with the result never in doubl.
His accuracy was deadly in spite f
the high wind which seemed to botif-
er his opponent.
Stephens and Vose, Michigan's
premier doubles team, disposed of
Stouffer and Hendershott in straight
sets winning 6-3, 6-2. They played
good tennis together and were mast-
era of th'e play throughout.
Although it was growing dark, Law. -
rence and Pierson took the court
against Krickbaum and Crane, t he 1
Wolverine pair. However, after the
Michigan team romped through the
first set 6-2, State decided to forfeit
the match so that they could return
to East Lansing last night.
Michigan will play its first Confer-
ence matches Saturday when the team
meets Indiana at Bloomington.
Jim Dodson, 145 pounder, has been
elected captain of the University of
Washington wrestling team for the
1927 season.

HI
0
1
0
2
1
2
2
1

PO
3
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6
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12
1
1
5
2

A
0
4
0
3
1
1
0
1
5

0
0
0
0
0
0
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15
H.
14
9

0
E.
0'

O'Rourk3,

Three base hit-Whitehill.j
Sacrifice hits-Wingo, Levsen.
Double plays-O'Rourke, Tavener to
Blue; Levsen to Burns; Levsen, L.
Sewell to Burns.
Bases on balls-Off Whitehill 1;'
Levsen 3.1
Stolen bases-Burns, Summa. I
Struck out-By Whitehill, 3; by'
Levsen, 3.
Left on bases-Detroit 11, Cleve-
land 6.
Let The Daily sell it for you thru
the Classified columns.-Adv.j

Suits Pressed

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