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January 09, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-09

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Jriwwm

f r

zt t

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 94 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1926 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DAVS ORES1I
SERVCEPROBE TO
INSREDISCIPLINE
ACTIVITIES OF DEPARTMENT TO
BE INVESTIGATED FOR 1
DISLOYALITY
FIGHT PROPAGANDA!
Seek Connection Of Service Personnel
With Anonymons Organzed Pres'
sure For Reorganization
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 8. - Admiis-
tratlon determination to enforce loyal-
ty and discipline throughout the army
has resulted in an order by Sec.
Dwight F. Davis, for a rigid investiga-
tion of air service activities in Wash-
ington.
The war secretary acted after docu-
mentary evidence had reached'him in-
dicating the existence of an organized
piopaganda to obtain air service leg-
islation not in harmony with the air
policy of the Coolidge administration.
The pupose of the investigation, which
is in charge of Maj. Gen. Eli A. Hel-
mick, inspector general of the army,
is to determine what connection air
service personnel may have had with
the circulation of an anoymous com-
mnunication urging that pressure be
brought on Congress to secure the en-
actment of an air corps bill. .In the
inquiry General Helmick is being as-
sisted by Maj. Gen. Mason M. Patrick,
chief of the army air service, and Brig.
Gen. James E. Fechet, assistant avia-
tion chief.
The communication under scrutiny
indicates that it was intended for air
officers of the regular forces, the Na-
tional Guard and organized reserves
all over the country, and calls for*
education work, with members of Con- 1
gress, "to put accross the idea of re-
organization" of the air service, the I
present being Ylescribed as "the psy-
chological moment for you to get
busy."
"It is to your interest that you get
in touch with these people as you
future in the service . will depend
largely on legislation in this session
of Congress," the united communica-
tion says, calling attentlon that there
are. "people of prominence in your
state who could communicate effec-
tively with senators and representa-
tives."
The document makes it plain tht
pressure is desired to enact the bill
reorganizing the air service as an in-
dependent corps similar to the marine
corps in the Navy, and points out that
General Patrick has presented such a
plan to the House military committee
last month.M
Theaters Present
Pictures Of J-Hop
Movies of the 1927 J-Hop held last
Friday night in Waterman and Bar-
bour gymnasiums are being shown in
local theaters this week. This is the
first time In the history of the junior
hops that potion pictures have bee
taken, similar arrangements for the
past affairs not being completed.
.ictures were taken the first part
of the evening of the grand march;
the forming of the block "M" is shown
in detail. The reel contains pictures
of the general chairman, John H.
Lovette, '27E, and his partner, Miss
Eleanor Gordon Morgan of Cleveland
Heights, Ohio. Views of the decora-
tions and the patron booth are also
included.
The final pictures of the film show
Ben Friedman, '27, captain of the 1926
football team, Coach Fielding I.

BOARD OF REGENTS POSTPONES
ACTION ON PROPOSED STADIUM

REPORT OF FACULTY COMMITTEE
WILL BE CONSIDERED AT
MEETING FEB. 25
Final action on the proposed new
stadium was postponed until Feb. 25
1by the Board of Regents at their last
meeting. At this time the report of
1 the faculty committee of the Universi-
ty Senate, which was unanimously
adopted by that body, will be con-
FORBID INSPECTION
OF INCOME TAXE5l
Senate Repeals Law Which Allows
Opening Of Records Of
Returns To Public
CAUSES CONTROVERSY
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 8.-Repeal of
the law allowing publication of the
.mounts of income tax payments was
approved tonight by the Senate.
The action of the House in putting
this provision in the tax reduction bill
was accepted by acclamation after
the Senate had rejected, 49 to 32, the
Norris amendment to open all income
tax returns to public inspection.
The Senate went into its first night
meeting of the session before reach-
ing a vote on the publicity provision,
which was regarded as one of the!
most controversial points in the bill.
Determined to get a final vote on
the measure before the end of the
week, both Republican and Democrat
members are prepared to continue the
day- and night sessions.
Wednesday has been set as the
deadline for passage of the bill by
the Senate if tax reduction is to be
assured by March 15, when first in-
come installments are due.
LITTLE WILL SPEK T
BANQU1ET OF EOUCTORS,
President Clarence Cook Little will
attend a banquet given in the honor
of Pres. J. H. Penniman, of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, by the board
of directors of the Commonwealth
club in Chicago Friday night.
Among the guests to attend the ban-
quet are the following: Pres. David
Kinley, of the University of Illinois;
Pres. Glenn Frank, of the University
of Wisconsin; Pres. Max Mason, of thie
University of Chicago; and Pres. W.
D. Scott, of Northwestern university.
Each president will speak on some
phase of.education. President Little a
subject is "The old Man's College."
POSTPONE TIME LIMIT
3FOR ENSIAN PAYMENTI
Due to the fact that the final date
for payment of 'Ensian subscriptions
came during the examination period,
the limit has been extended until 5
o'clock next Saturday by the 'Ensian
business staff. Checks received either
through the mail or delivered in per-
son to the 'Ensian office in the Press
building before that time will be ac-
cepted.
The price of the yearbook is now
$4 for those who signed a pledge dur-
ing the recent 'Ensian campaign, and
$4.50 for all others. The office at the
Press building will be open from 2 to
5 o'clock every afternoon this week.
MI NTEAM WILL
DEBATE KNOX COLLEGE

(Special to The Daily)
GALESBURG, Ill., Feb. 8.-Michigan'
will meet Knox college in a debate
before the Galesburg Kiwanis club and
their guests here tomorrow night, on
the question: "Resolved, that the fed-
eral government should subsidize our
commercial air service." No decision
will be given.
The Michigan team, which will up-
hold the negative side of the case,
composed of Harry L. Gervais. '27;
Thamos V. Koykka, '27, and Philip N.
Krasne, '27, arrived here early today.
Veteran Disputed
Monitor's Exploits
(By Associated Press)

sidered, and the final decision on the
stadium question reached.
The report of the Senate was re-,
ceived at the last meeting -of the Re-
gents, on Jan. 28, but was tabled and
made a special order of business for
this month, due to the fact that cer-
tain of the Regents wished to make
a further study of the portions of the1
report before taking final action. How-
ever, according to Shirley W. Smith,
secretary of the University, the Re-
gents were pleased with the report
of the Senate committee.
Stadium plans have already been
approved by the Board in Control of
Athletics, and with the unanimous ac-
ceptance by the University Senate of
a report which advocated a new struc-'
ture outside of Ferry field, the Board
of Regents' decision is the only step
left in the ratification of the new sta-
dium.
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of
intercollegiate athletics, who will
spend the next two weeks on a speak-
ing tour, will be in Ann Arbor on
Feb. 25, when the Regents meet.
YOS'T WILL GV
SEIES OF TALKSI

I i
I

LITTLE RPAEI
TO PUT POLICIES1
INTO OPERATION1
FRAYEB, ANGELL, YOAKUM WILL
CONSIDER FEASIBILITY
OF LITTLE'S PLANS
TO NAME OTHERS
Ideas Outlined In Inaugural Address
Include Orientation Of Freshmen,
Housing and Alumni Problems
Tentative plans have been an-
nounced by President Clarence Cook
Little for development of the Univer-
sity personnel work as outlined in his
inaugural address. An orientation
period for freshmen, a modification of
the educational program for women,
provisions for a preliminary study of
vocational guidance, improvement of
housing conditions, and the elements
in common between pre-school, cle-
mentary school, high school, and col-
lege educations will be among the first!
matters to be studied.
Prof. William A. Frayer, of the his-
tory department, will devote part-
time next fall to a study of the possi-
bilities of establishing an orientationj
period for freshmen, which would cor-
respond to the Freshman Week out-
lined by President Little in his
inaugural address.
He will also investigate means of
improving the transition from under-
graduate status to that of alumnus.
The aim will be to educate the stu-
dents in such a way that they will
be better alumni, more useful to thej
University and with more direct con-1
tact with its activities.
Housing conditions will be investi-
gated by Robert C. Angell, of the
sociology department, particularly
with the aim of bettering the living
conditions of non-fraternity men, and
centering on the feasibility of group-
ing their rooming and boarding houses.
Funds were provided at the last
meeting of the Board of Regents for
a preliminary study of vocationalI
guidance. This study will be under
the directionof Prof. Clardnce %.
Yoakum, of the School of Business
Administration.
In the near future someone will be
appointed to investigate the possibility
of modifying the educational program
for women. A plan was recently for-
mulated by a joint committee of Uni-
versity representatives and members
of the State Medical association for
changes in the educational plan, andI
the person who is appointed will at-
tempt to determine how this might
best be worked into the present edu-

COLUMBIA PROFESSOR WILL GIVE
PUBLIC ADDRESS HERE MARCH 4

"LOCARN OAND AFTER" WILL
THE GENERAL SUBJECT
OF LECTURE

BE

Cities
Up

In Michigan And Illinois Make
Itinerary; irincipal Address
Is Listed For Chicago

Dr. James T. Shotwell, professor of
history in Columbia university, will
deliver a public address on "Locarno;
And After" Thursday afternoon,
March 4, in Natural Science audi-
torium, it was announced last night.
Dr. Shotwell's appearance here, spoin-
SHAPLEYTOGIVE
LECTURE HRSA
Astronomer Will Speak On "Beyond
Milky Way" As Eightl Number
Of Oratorical Program
STUDIED BRIGHT STARS
--.
Prof. Harlow Shapley, director of
the Harvard observatory, will give
the eighth lecture of the Oratorical
association season course Thursday
evening in l1ll auditorium. His sub-
ject will be "Beyond the Milky Way".
Professor Shapley's astronomical
work has been given credit for mak-
ing a new epoch in our conception of
the immensity of the stellar universe.
yIn 1907, while a student at the Uni-
t versity of Missouri, he commenced the
studies that later resulted in the new
conclusions as to the size of the per-
ceptible universe.
He was from the first interested in
the study of "Cepheid variables", those
brilliant stars that are thought to be
tremendous globes of pulsating gases,
a hundred times brighter than the
sun. The three years following 1911
were spent at Princeton, where lie
studied and worked with Prof. 1. N.
Russell, receiving the degree of doc-
tor of philsophy. In 1914, he joined
the staff of the famous Mt. Wilson ob-
servatory in California, going on a
leave of absence in March of last year
to the observatory at Harvard.
At Mt. Wilson, Dr. Shapley per-
fected his method of measuring star
distances photometrically. He then
applied the method to the problem of
the distances and structure of the
great star-clusters, with the result
that the stellar universe, as known to
scientists, is at least a thousand tines
larger than it was before the distances
to the clusters were measured.
" Chemist From
Milwaukee TO
Lecture Today!

SPEAKS HERE TONIGHT
Leaving Ann Arbor tomorrow,
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of in-
tercollegiate athletics, will spend the I
next two weeks on a speaking tour,
delivering addresses in cities in west-
ern Michigan and in Illinois. His
principal speech will be given at the
Associated Fraternities banquet at
Chicago on Thursday night, when he
will appear on the program with
Coach George Little, athletic director
at Wisconsin, and other prominent
representatives of mid-west universi-
ties.
Coach Yost will address a Parents
and Scouts banquet at Jackson tomor-
row night, which will also be attend-
ed by a large delegation from the Uni-
versity of Michigan club of Jackson.
After the banquet, the coach will
leave for Chicago, where he will speak
at the John Marshall high school of
that city in the afternoon before ad-
dressing the fraternity banquet that
night.
On Friday, Coach Yost will speak
before a Fathers and Sons banquet at
Waukegan, Illinois, and will also ad-
dress the local branch of the Michi-
gan Alumni association. Returning to
Grand Rapids on Feb. 13, the coach
will speak at a banquet of the Alumni
association of that city, which will be
attended by more than 100 high school
football men, all seniors in the
Grand Rapids high schools.
After a brief stay in Ann Arbor over
the week-end, Coach Yost will leave
again Monday on a tour of northern
Michigan. His itinerary includes
speeches in Escanaba, Marquette and
Iron Mountain, and other cities in the
northern part of the state will be add-
ed to this list this week. On Feb.
23, he will address a Boy Scout ban-
quet at Manchester. The latter part
of the month, the exact date not hav-
ing been decided upon as yet, he will
deliver an adress at a meeting of the
Associated Alumni clubs of Buffalo,
N. Y.
Tonight, Coach Yost will present
three Eagle scout badges to Ann Ar-
bor Boy Scouts at a Parents and
Scouts banquet to be held in the
Methodist Episcopal church. Fielding,
Jr., will accompany his father at this
time.
QUESTION FOR MIDWEST
DEBATE LEAGUE CHANGED
Word was received yesterday by
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, head of
the public speaking department, that
the question for debate March 19 in
the Midwest debate league has been
changed from "Resolved: that the U.
S. should become a member of the
World Court" to "Resolved: that the
tendency to centralize power and re-
sponsibility in the federal government
should be opposed."
' Twenty men who were selected from
a large list of tryouts will start train- 1
ing on this question this afternoon
under the direction of G. E. Densmore,
debate coach.
Announce Days To
n' - W .@e

sored by the League of Nations Non-
Partisan association, was originally
scheduled for Jan. 18, but postpone-
ment was necessary to suit his con-
venience and also to avoid a conflict
with a meeting of the University
Senate.
Professor Shotwell has been a con-
spicuous and distinguished figure in
international affairs since the World
war. Prior to that, lie was noted in
educational circles as an able his-
torian an, successful teacher. In
1917-18, lie was a member of the com-
mission appointed to gather data,
economic, historical, and gegoraphical,
for the peace conference. He was at
Versailles in 1919 as chief of the di-
vision of history of the peace confer-
ence, and as a member of the Inter-
national Labor Legislation committee.
In succeeding years, Dr. Shotwell has
spent much time in Europe, studying,
post war conditions, and the function-
ing of the League of Nations and the
International Court of Justice at The
Hague. He has recently returned
from several months abroad.
MITCHELLATTACKS
AIR INVESTIGATIONI
Charges Use Of Espionage System By
Service Officials; Says Inquiry
Aimed At General Patrick
PRAISES VETERAN CHIEF
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 8.-An espion-
age system is being maintained In the
army air service, William Mitchell,
former assistant air chief, charged to-
night, declaring the investigation by
Secretary Davis into air service activi-
ties in Washington was primarily
aimed at Maj. Gen. Mason M. Patrick,
head of the army air service.
An anonymous communication said
to have been sent out to obtain con-
gressional support for the air corps
bill and which the war department is
investigating, was said by Mitchell to
have been I part a summary of Gen-
eral Patrick's memorandum being
prepared for Congress and was sent
out by a civilian reserve officer. He
was told, he added, that a clerk "pre-
sumably acting as a spy," sent a copy
of General Patrick's memorandum to
Secretary Davis.
This action of Mr. Davis, he charged,
was carried out at the behest "of the
war department clique", and was just
another example of the attempt of the
department to intimidate those hold-
ing different air views, and to keep
accurate information from the public.
Mitchell said the new department
proceeding was "aimed at any change
in existing conditions at all." Gen-
eral Patrick, he said, was "the only
member of the old regime to see the
light and conme out and tell the truth
about it."
SUNDERLAND TO LECTURE
AT UNIESTY OF TEXAS.
Prof. E. It. Sunderland, of the Law
school, will leave during the latter
part of next month for Austin, Texas,
to deliver a series of lectures oil legal
procedure at Texas university. The
University of Texas has inaugurated
a new policy of having professional
men who have devoted much of their
time in a special field speak to the
university students.
Professor Sunderland will d.eliver
five lectures, from March 22 to 28. Of
these, two will be popular in nature
and will be given before the general
student body. Three will be techni-
cal and will be attended by law stu-
dents only.
President Writes

Ensian Dedication
Upon the request of Con. Earl Cory
Michener 'of Adrian, who attended the
University's Law school in 1900-1902,
President Coolidge has written a tri-
bute to former President Marion L
Burton for the dedication page of the
1.926 Michiganensian. The article will
occupy a full page in the year book.
Dean's Wife Dies

MIC'HIGAN BEATS
GOPHERS AND TIES
WITH ,WISCONSIN
WOLVERINES DOWN MINNESOTA
QUIN'TET :"3.22 IWITH
EASE
HARRIGAN STARS

l

Deadlock In Conference Standing
Will Not Be Broken Until Satur-
day's Ganes Are Played
By Joseph Kruger
Michigan went into a deadlock with
Wisconsin for first place in the Big
Ten basketball race by virtue of an
easy victory registered over the Min-
nesota five last night at the Yost field
house by a score of 33-22.
The Wolverines and Badgers are
perched on top of the heap with a
record of three victories and one de-
feat, and there is no chance to dis-
place either of them until Saturday
night, when Chicago will battle "Doc"
Meanwell's squad and Michigan will
face Iowa at Iowa City.
Although Michigan failed to accu-
mulate a large total last night, there
was no point in the contest that found
the Gophers threatening. Michigan
assumed the lead immediately after
the start of the game when Oosterbaan
scored a field goal, and then was nev-
er headed.
Coach Mather started Chambers and
Harrigan at the forwards, Oosterbaan
at center, and Doyle and Reece at the
guard positions, and this combination
showed flashes of clever passwork,
but the work for the greater part of
the second half was listless.
Michigan led the Gopher quintet, 20-
7, at the close of the first half, Mc-
Kinnon accounting for the only basket
for the visitors during this period.
Minnesota outscored Michigan, 15-13,
during the second half, however, the
Wolverines lagging on defense and
permitting men to get a man in the
clear. '
It is interesting to note that the
Wolverines were at their best in foul
throwing last night, accounting for
nine free throws out of 11 chances.
Oosterbaan was the individual scor-
ing ace with three baskets and four
free throws to his credit while Cham-
I bers, with three field goals and two
fouls, was close behind. Ed Reece
played a fine game in the first half,
scoring seven points, but the dimuini-
t iveplayerfailed to send the ball
3 through the rim in the second period.
Although Frank Harrigan scored
but four points, he played one of his
best games of the season. Awarded
the difficult task of playing the role
formerly played by Cherry, Harrigan
acquitted himself in splendid fashion,
bringing the ball down the floor for
offensive play with considerable abil-
ity. Harrigan's deceptive dribble
bothered the Gophers throughout the
contest.
Walden, substitute center, and Ny-
dahl, substitute guard, proved to be
the high scorers for the visitors, the
former accounting for three field
goals and a free throw and the latter
two baskets and a free throw. Rasey,
the star Gopher forwerd, was held
scoreless from the field.
iBOX SCORE
Michigat'
F.G. F.T. Pts.
Chambers, l.f.............3 2 8
Harrigan, r.f...........1 2 4
Oosterbaan, c. . .....3 4 10
Doyle, l.f. (capt.) ...... 2 0 4
Reece, r.g.............3 1 7
Line, c. ..............0 0 0
Rasnick, r.g. ............ 0 0 0
Totals ................12 9 33
Minnesota

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cational system and how it would be
received by the students. Dr. John A. Wilson, chief chemist
Appointments will also be made for of the Gallun and Sons company of
a study of the elements in common Milwaukee, will give an illustrated
between pre-school, elementary school, lecture on "The Chemistry of Leather
high school and college educations in Manufacture" at 4:15 o'clock today in
order to find where they are in op- room M224 of the Natural Science
position and and where they might be building.
made more uniform so that they will As a result of his scientific investi-
not counteract each other. gations, Dr. Wilson has long been rec-
ognized as a chemist of national re-
Politial Science pute. In recent years, he has done
practically all the constructive re-
Professor Leaves - search work connected with the man-
ufacture of leather. An indication of
On European Trzp the vast amount of the study which
he has undertaken may be realized.
Prof. Thomas H. Reed, of the politi- from the publication of nine scion-'
cal science department, will sail for tific papers in the last year.
Europe tomorrow from New York city. In the investigations Dr. Wilson has
He left Ann Arbor last night. While approached the subject both from the
on this vacation, Professor Reed in- viewpoint of the manufacturer and
tends to make a thorough study of from the viewpoint of the customer.
metropolitan government as it pre- In general, it is expected that his ad-
sents itself in the larger cities of dress will treat with the former view-
Europe. He has decided to spend six point. With the assistance of lantern
months at the work; one month in slides the various methods of tanning
Brussels, two months in London, two leather will be explained, and the re-
months in Berlin, and one month in suits of scientific research will be!
presented.
In addition to this work Professor The lecture which is being given
Reed will also deliver eight lectures under the auspices of the American
Reedwil alo dlive eiht ectresSociety of Chemical Engineers will be
at the University of Brussels on the to hemic.
subject, "American Municipal Govern- open to the public.
ment". Six of the lectures will be '
delivered before Easter and two are I
to be given after the recess.NEW STUDENIS ENROLL
During Professor Reed's absence,
Ernest B. Schulz, of the political sci- i
Once department, will take charge of ECONDnSEMESTER
hm'is classes In municipal government.
Registration of new students in the
PUBLICATIONS MAKE University had reached 397 by Satur-
CALL FOR TRYOUTS I day night, according to figures given
out yesterday by Registrar Ira M.
All second semester freshmen Smith, and enough more were expect-
a! nd s res hofwishtor ed yesterday to laut the total well
and sophomores who wish to try vr4.Ofhsenrlng27wre
out for the business staff o le over 400. Of those enrolng, 277 were
ot f men, and 120 were women.

Yost, and Prof. Ralph
the Law School in a
ence.

W. Aigler ofI
social confer-I

Anatomy Quarters.
Near CompletionI
Except for research laboratories, allI
work of the anatomy department in
the Medical school has been moved in-
to the new Medical building. Part
of the equipment was moved in dur-
ing the Christmas holidays, and dur-
ing the period between semesters the
task was completed.
Installation of equipment in the
bacteriology department is also being.
carried out under Dr. Frederick G.
Novy. This department will not be
transferred to the new building until
next fall.

F.G. F.T.I
Rasey, r.f.............0 3
Gay, L.f. ...............0 2{
McKinnon, c.............1 0
Tuttle, r.g. .............. 1 0
Wright, l.g . .............. 0 0
Walden, c.............. 3 1
Wheeler, r.g............. 0 1
Mason, l.g. .............'0 0
Nydahl, r.g..............2 1
Totals ................ 7 8
Referee, Schommer (Chicago)
loney (Notre Dame).

Pts.
3
2
2
2
0
7
1
0
5
22
Ma-

1
i
1
e

.
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i

Pearson Resigns
Iowa Presidency
IOWA CITY, Feb. 8.-The state
board of education accepted the resig-
nation of Pres. Raymond A. Pearson,
of Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa,
at its meeting here today. Dr. Pear-
son left immediately for New York.
He will sail from there soon for a
i tour of Europe. The board members
E and Dr. Pearson refused to make a

Daily are requested to report at
the Press building, Maynard
street, at 4:30 o'clock Friday.
All second semester freshmen
and sophomores who wish to try

This record takes count of all stu- Mrs. Wilbur R. Humphreys, wife of
dents who were not in school last' Dean Humphreys of the literary col-
semester, although some of them may lege, died Monday, Feb. 1, in Grand.
l have been here previously. Rapids after an illness of two weeks.
Mr. Smith announced that all grades Services were held in Ann Arbor the
fo thses tudents whosereords were I fnninzTu esdacv in the nolnh fun-

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