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April 01, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-01

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~'AC~ FO~7R

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 1, 192G

iii' " .two,.. .. ....'ter. ,"... .. .,., Itl ewriww.ikk A +4 rwlirrwrn.rr s r . ,® i, i57iifii:V.r.. r. .. 3 zyirs

41

Published every .morning except Monday
during the Cuiversity year by the Board in
Centroi of Student Publicauons.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Aesociation,
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titld to the usefor republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwisel
credited ir. this paper and tke local news pub-
lished therein.

Wntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
M chigan, as second class matter. Special rate
if postage grauted by Third Assistant ,Post-
ubscriiktion Jr carrier. $3.5a; by mail,
14.00
Offices: An* Arbor Press Building, May-
ad Street.
?2irme'scn Editorfa; r4paS sibuess, Iq.
EDITOR1AL STAFI
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVI t
Chairman, Editorial Boar.... Norman R. Thal
CiyEditor......... ... Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor ........... Manning Ilouseworth
Women's Editor............Helen S. Ramsay
G:..o. r ~liULLU . _......J'sobKrge

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ports "Ed r.. .... .jspu u
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smnith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude Bailey Harriett Levy
C harkes Behymer Ellis Merry
V. ih a Bryer Dorothy Morehouse.
hillp brooks " Margaret Parker
Barnum Buckingham ,tanford N. Phelps
Stratton Buck Simon Rosenbaum
Carl Burger Wilton Simpson
Edgar Carter Janet Sinclair
oseph Chamberlain Courtland Smith
leyer Cohen Stanley Steinko
Carleton Chaipe Louis Tendler.
Douglas Doubleday Henry Thurnau
Fugene H. Gutekunst David C. Vokes
Andrew Goodman' Marion Wells
James T. Herald Cassam A. Wilson,
Rusell Hitted homas C. Winter.
Miles Kimball Marguerite Zilske
' rf ion Kubik
BUJSINESS STAFF
;Volephona 21214

5
:

BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
A! eI tisin!!........... .. .Rud )I h Thotelnian
Advertising.......... ...Wm. L. Mullin
uesing.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
( i r-ul~ttion............Janes R. DePuy
, .ilication..............Frank R. Tent, Jr.
Accounts.................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable, Jr. Prank Mosher
S w. Car Bauer F. A. Norquist
John 1. Bobrink Loleta G. Parker
*t<Jlngton David Perrot
W. J. Cox Robert Prentis#
A nmn iel, Wie. C. Pusch.
?'ry Flintcruian Nance Solon Aon
S an Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
aIO T elyns Margaret Smith
4 A. seSidney Wilson

sion of a general education, he is re-
quired to carry on half of his work
outside theadepartment of his major
study, in which he must submit to
the regular rules. In commenting on
the new plan, Walter Dill Scott, presi-
dent of the university said:
"The whole program is designed to
aid the student who is making a deft-
nite plan for his lifework. By this
plan, the student who has a definite
aim in life and wishes to further that
aim by special study will be given
unqualifid aid by 'the University."
HONOR AMONG THIEVES
With the utter disregard for the
┬žanctity "of a memorial gift to th {
Universty, to say nothing of the ef-
fort and tin e ,expended by several
members of th: facility in filling its
shelves, inre than,3 volumes have
been stolen by 'stdents who were
supposed to have beenenjoying mere-
ly the privileges of the Pendleton
library.
Many there are who might point to
this, and not ungleefully, too, as but
another example of the fallacy of the
attempt to educate the masses. Cer-
tainly there are a great number of
people who matriculate here each fall
who have nothing but a legal right
to be in a university. The fact that
the books have been taken and not
returned, proves beyond an iota of
doubt that the. University is over-
crowded with vagabonds lacking all
appreciation of the advantages of
cultural training,-far more than
scholastic records it proves this.
Two courses are open; one of thes
is already being put into operation-
a gradual weeding out process. The
other is to build up a spirit of honor,
if such a thing is possible, of such a
strength that all things of this sort
will become intolerable, not to an in-
terested few, but to approximately
all. When this has been done, years
from today, to be sure, the University
will be more than a group of hetero-
geneous architectural types, a faculty,
and a fine athletic record,-it will be
something to inspire real and lasting
pride. The possibility of such a pln
may be seen to reduce to a probability
when we consider that honor has
I been known even among thieves.
COMPLETE TE BUDGET
Students in universities and col-
leges should, more. than any other
class, appreciate the worthiness of
giving aid to others. This class is
enjoying the generosity of others to
an extntthat they seldom realize, for
they take for granted many of the
privileges that are theirs.
Every student in college is receiv-
ing an education for which he pays
onlya minor share of the cost.
IThrough the gifts of individuals and
governments, colleges and universi-
ties are enabled to give their services
at a low price, and thus many are
given the opportunity to receive the
benefits. In another way, a great
majority of those attending the col-
leges are supported by parents, in
whole or in part.
Certainly university students should
appreciate the need for institutions
like the S. C. A., and should support
them in their field of giving aid to
others in Ann Arbor and near-by
cities, as well as conducting services
for students. This help-the-other-fel-
low society deserves help in its cam-
paign to "Complete the Budget."
Two reporters for the New York
Times are tramping toward the tip of
Alaska. The idea is not to interview
Santa Claus, but to get in touch. with
the various polar expeditions. Very

few will envy them in their possession
of the North Pole beat.
Theatrical producers have agreed'
with players for a five-year peace.'
But it is understood that tempera-
mental actresses are exempt.
"Coolidge Sees No Dark loud Over'
Business"-headline. Has he been in
Pittsburgh lately?
EDITORIAL COMMENT
AT THE GRAVE OF TLHE UNKNOWN
(The Boston Transcript)
It is a sorry piece of news that tha
President of the United States has
felt constrained to place a uniformed
guard at the tomb of the Unkonwn Sol-
dier in Arlington Cemetery, to ensure
the proper mark. of respect from all
visitor t that national shrine. The
simplest etilu ettQ -requires that the
visitor' shdiii. stand at ,attention or
salute or raise his hat in approaching
this hallowed presence, but even th
omission of these more or less for-
mal honors can be pardonoed in the;
case of many. -
cBut to utUlize the tomb as a lunch-
eon table, as has been done, to re-
gard the sacred spot as a fit place for
merrymaking, is to insult the dead,

ASTE OL
i.; FOOL
On certain mornings, it is abso-
lutely inevitable that one must sleep,
There are various causes for this,
which, however, we will not go into.
I Furthermore this factnistrue only on
dayl when one has nine o'clocks or
earlier. Now the problem, as it
strikes us, is this. All of us owe the
members of the fauclty some consid-
eratio, and in, cases, such as this
their feeling should come first. The
point is should one attend class and
sleep, or stay home and sleep. This
may seem petty to some, but it is a
vital problem in every students life,
particularly at about 7:30 or 8:30 in
the morning. Of course as far as the
student is concerned it matters very
little. For if one interrupts one sleep
to attend the class one saves a bolt,
and on the other hand if one sleeps
right through, one is more combort-
able.
From the point of view of the Pro-
fessor, there are two angles also. If
a student attends and sleeps, he at
least doesn't talk out loud or whisper
during the lecture, and statistics show
that the percentage of snoring done
after six in the morning, is less than
one half of one per cent. On the
other hand to the more sensitive and
less case-hardened instructor, the lec-
ture mjay seem futile when the stu-
dents are asleep. This is true, how-
ever, only when he fails to consider
how futile it is when they are awake.
Altogether, you see, it is a very
delicate problem, involving countless
fine shadings. Personally we have
not been able to arrive 'at any definite
decision, but vacilate from morning to
morning and from week to week. If
there is among the vast turmoil of
student life, one who has solved this
problem for himself, and is willing to
make public decision and the philo-
sophical methods and paths by which
he reached it, we shall be more than
pleased to publish it herein at an
early date.
* **
LADIES, LEDI US YOUR LAGHS
NOTED PRODUCER TO EXHIBIT
A1M FOR TWO WEEKS RUN
(Reproduced word for word from
the program of the Boustelle Play-
'house.
"It has been done. Once more Miss
Bonstelle has leaped into the arena
and came out with the manuscript of
I George Kelys inimitablecomedy,
"The Show-Off" tucked under her
arm, which she will offer at the Play-
house for two weeks beginning on the
above mentioned date."
* * *
At last the arm, for many years
behind the leg in drawing power has
come into its own.
** *
"WHOM CATHERINE ADORES"
It was a mistake, says the depart-
ment on our left in more typical lan-
guage, to have Captain Edstaston so
short. Catherine never kissed a man
under six feet.
There are several causes for this
mistake. First of all, as the article
points out, the Patiomkin was too
frail to handle a bigger Edstaston.
The first act finale will indeed be a
problem worth seeing. Another
cause worth mentioning is that Cath-
erine never kCissed Edstaston; she
tickled him in a more brutal and less

dignifi'd manner. Added to that is
the fact that meticulous Mr. Shaw ap-
parently had a rather diminutive per-
son in mind when he wrote the line
about "You threw me on my back like
maigk, though I could lift you with
o'ne hand" and put them in the mouth
of Patiomkin himself.
Those who missed the earlier pro-
s duction, however, may consider them-
selves fortunate in seeing this one,
since in addition to a much improved
performance of Shaw's play, there is
added a curtain-raiser which features
as its leading character a trained dog.
* * *
MORE MILNE STUFF
Poem Of Utter Contentment
John had a car, a
Hispano-Suiza,
John had a pocketbook
Very big and fat,
John had some gin
And a cute blonde flapper,
"And that," said John,
"Is that '"
.. -7-YIFNIF.
' * * *
Ita 1'not our -habit to reprint humor
from .otljer sources, since we believe
jliat our own-material is bad enough,
Lich appeared in the recent issue of
ILife. -
The illustration showed a gentle-
man standing in front of a revolving
door, urging another gentleman to

MUSICI
AND
DRAMA
TONlGH'T,: The Students' recital
in the School of Music auditorium at
8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: "Great Catherine" by
George Bernard Shaw in the Mimes
theatre at 8:30 o'clock.
"WHY NOT V
A review, by Everett Grey.
Coming in proper sequence, "Why
Not?" Jesse Lynch Williams' sequel
to "Why Marry?" was brought to the
Whitney yesterday' afternoon by the
Bonstelle company. Taken as an
afternoon's entertainment, as a high
comedy it is ,a sparkling, ever-moving
piece with somethingmore.uIt hai
the force of good natured but well
aimed satire, satire that was in many
cases just subtle enough to pass over
the heads of the actors by a scant
inch. All of the cast made the most
of the deftly woven comedy, and dis-
played a working knowledge of the
sati're, with one exception. Unfor-
tunately the part of Aunt Jane was
played as a typical stock old maid
a fault which lost for the play, not
only most of the gentle irony, but
what was potentially one of its most
delectable characters.
With apologies for the proverbial
tastelessness of comparison, it is in
this case seemingly unavoidable. First
as to the play. "Why Not?" is not as
important a play as its predecessor.,
What it gains in adroitness of tech-

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Why are so many Students and Faculty Members
Using Riderls
Ask them. The answer is: Writing quality-large ink capac-
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Six Tables of Reference Books
EUI)lCATION AN) E;COQTICS AN)
PHILOSOPHSOY POLITICAL SCIENCE
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Spring-time

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At both-ends of the
Diagonal Walk

- SKILLED REPAIRING
ALL MAKES

} THURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKAC
A CONVENTION
In an age of Carpenters' unions,
IA ailroad brotherhoods, Machinists'
unions, Bricklayers' union, ChambersI
of Commerce, Civic Improvement so-
cieties, and all the other, organiza-
tions flourishing for material objec-
dives, it is a pleasure to welcome to
Ann Arbor a convention that deals
ji the increase in knowledge and the
spread of new learning.
The Michigan Academy of Science,
Arts, and Letters is an organization
of professors and instructors of these
departments of learning, that meets
for mutual benefit, taking back to
their schools the results of the most
recent research work of leaders in
their fileds. Also the leading speeches C
amre later published by the Academy so
that the knowledge is spread to an
even .greater extent. _
'We welcome the members of the
Academy to this, their thirty-first an-
nualmeeting,-a resarch group in an
age of materialism.
"LIBERAL" EDUCATION '
It has become the tendency in
American institutions of higher learn-
ing to cut away as much red tape as
Possible and to remove as many re-
strictions on students as can be done'
without turning the school into a
hodge-podge of intellectual wander-
ers. The object is to let a student
develop as an individuality instead of
as the stamped product of class-pro-
duction. Believing that by this meth-
od, the weak shall perish by the way-
side or become lost in an educational
Mlind-alley and the strong shall be-
come stronger from greater self re-
(_'e. educators are gradually di-
- erging to greater pedagogical free-
dom.
ny ins~ttutions have taken falter-
tes in -this direction, such as
maicompulsory class atten-
(8 c, win g credit for undergrad-
Y r 1 .a-ndl simplifying:. or do-
avay.v tlh ffinalexaminations, but
T l westertn has recently taken the'
greatest stride toward this individual
e ucatton. Under a plan to go into
cffect next year, juniors and seniors,
S'lho havd chosen a study for speciali-
tion are permitted to go about their
work as individuals rather than as
members of a class. Grades, atten-f
Glance, and final examinations will no E

Jessie Royce Landis
Evadne Thompson in "Why Not?"
cique,'it loses i unity and dramatic
force.
There is not the climax of the final
scene of "Why Marry?" ror the well
developed struggle against human in-
stitutions. By the curtain of the sec-
ond act the problem which the author I
skillfully and speedily presented in
the early part of the first act has been
entirely solved. The climax of "WhyI
Not?" is reached before the end of the
second act. The third act, apparently
written to point out the fact that di-
vorce, the answer to the problem of
the play, is not quite as happy a so-I
lution as the two couples believed.
The problem of thus modifying this
defense of divorce was too great to
make good theatre, in spite of the fact
that it had to be stated if the theme
was to ring true.
Miss Bonstelle was handicapped in
many respects in her presentation of
the play. First of all she did not have
the authoritative guiding hand of the
author, nortime unlimited Iossibilities
for casting. Hence the local produc-
tion of "Why Marry?" was in most
respects more gratifying. There can
be no greater problem in interpreta-
tion than a satire of this kind. Its
mixtures of sublteness and comedy
jare difficult to comprehend before
actual performance. The . well worn
technical tricks of the average stock
company are fatal to this now rare
form of modern drama. In the few in-'
stances in which they were brought
to use yesterday afternoon they were
quite obviously out of harmony and
ineffective.I
If the performance had flaws which
were not looked for or found in the
amateur production, aided by the au-
thor, it was no less refi'eshing or de-
licious, and, quite as worth seeing.
THE STUDENTS' RECITAL
Hope Bauer, mezzo-soprano, a stu-
dent of James Hamilton of the Uni-
versity School of Music, will offer the
following program in a graduation re-
cital at 8 o'clock tomorrow evening
in the School of Music au ditorium:
Der Ehre Gottes Aus Der
N'atur................Beethoven(
Der Tod Und Das Madchen. Schubert 1
Diegenlied ............... Brahms
Lenz.... ...............Ilildach
Caro Mio Ben .............Giordani
So Tu M'Ami, Se Sospiri

DON'T
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Each Tuesday and Wed-
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SHAMPOO, MARCEL
AND
BOB CURL
$1.25
iILDA ARNST
Bertine Beauty Shoppe
111 South University Ave.
Phone 3839

Is your Kodak loaded? Be prepared
for the vacation. Take home some snap-
shots of the campus, your friends, or
any scene which interests you.
We develop and print pictures on short
notice. A complete stock of kodaks and
supplies.
rnWell - C04aI-= COqe
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oweli -l Coal - Coke
Phones 4551 and 4552 Office, Cornwell Block

"WATCH ANN ARBOR GROW!"

907

FOR SALE

Lincoln Ave.

I -
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We are pleased to offer for sale the beautiful eleven room house at 907 lincoln
Avenue. Lot 160 x 192. Beautiful trees and shrubbery. Steam heat. louse recently
painted and has new roof. Two baths. Sleeping porch, library, open porches. Price,
$32,000. Terms.
FRATERNITIES - SORORITIES
60' MONROE ST.--Thirteen rooms, three bathrooms, dining room will accommo-
date thirty; house will accommodate twenty-two; steam heat. Possession July 1,
1926. Small down. payment.
ION) EAST ANN ST.-Fifteen rooms, lot 60 x 132, steam heat, tiled baths (two
showers. house accommodates twenty-eight; dining room accommodates forty; near
Medical School and University Campus. Price, $21,000. Terms.
1706 CAMBRI)D(E ROAD.-Eleven rooms, brick and shingle construction, sleeping
porch, lot 75 x 168. House faces park and Washtenaw Ave. Four fireplaces, oak
floors. Location unsurpassed. Possession at once. Price $30,000. Terms.
WASH T ENAW AVENUE LOT-Size 200 x 235, all improvements. Price; $10,500.
For further information or for an appointment

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