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March 31, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-31

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PACE FO'JR'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W7D.N-SIDAY, fAflCIT 11, 1924

Published every morning except Monday
during the Universityu year by the Board in
Control of -Student Pulications..
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association..
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches .Credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.;
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
B£ postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier. $3.50; by miail,
$4-oo.
Offices: Ana Arbor-ress Building, May-
yard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4gs5; bnsisecs, a24.

&,''

%ITORIAL STAFF;
Te.lephone 4921

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Tha
City Editor.....:.....Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor........... Manning Housewortb
WVgmgn's Editor...........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor...........- Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor......William Waithour
Music and Drama........Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVorea ThomasV. Koykka
W. Cavin Patterson
Assistamt City Editors
Irwin Olian. Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

wonderfully developing exercises to "due process" involves an opportun-
be derived therefrom, there is the ity to be heard, it surely is not ob-
practical side of being proficient in tained in sitting down and talking the
handling oneself in the water. matter over with the professor who1
To those interested in this most himself, and alone, is the judge of
practical, beneficial, and pleasant his own action. The professor, im-
sport. Coach Mann and members of mune from having his action called
the Varsity swimming team will daily into question, is protected by an in-
give lessons free of charge at the violable safe-guard.#
Union pool, where they will be on It is not beyond the mind' of the!
duty during the hours when the pool usual person to suppose that that1
is open. Michigan long desired a protection combined with any preju-t
pool, and now we have it; next comes dice or partiality, purpose, whim, or
the offer to teach everyone how to fancy, might produce a corresponding
use it. decision; just as it is not beyond the
mind of the usual person to suppose
HE IS PRESIDENT that that same protection would not
Two years ago, when the Republi- be of any moment in the judgment of
can party named Calvin Coolidge as another. The adverse criticism I make
its standard-bearer in the Presidential in this entire article I do not mean to
campaign, "old line" party men apply to any particular individual,
chafed under the restraining hand but to the group as a whole, with the
laid upon them by their nominee. It one or two exceptions that have chal-
was Mr. Coolidge, and not they, they ( lenged my attention so far. (The an-
realized, who was becoming dominant noying part of making exceptions is
in the party organization. that the professors at whom this art-
With the election safely over and icle is directed will, with secure
Congress once more in session, party smugness, count all themselves as the.
veterans in the Senate, impatient to exceptional one or two). At all events,
assert their position and to check any professor ought not to have it in
Presidential power, did what a United his power to withhold every blue
States Senate had seldom done be- book. ABSOLUTELY, if he expects
fore: they refused the President his the confidence and respect of the stu-
time-honored right to appoint whom dent,, as well as if he in his position
he pleased to cabinet posts. This somehow is to be associated with the
time the President was forced to idea of justice.
yield, even the subterfuge of making I infer that the literary college
a vacation appointment proving un- has not been vexed by over-demands
successful. Senate leaders appar-;upon the professors' time, for upon
ently once more held the whip. inquiring at the registrar's office, I
Since that time, a struggle, more found that there was no ruling, but
or less silent, has been under way. to that the returning of the final blue
determine who shall have the right to j books is left in the discretion of the
control the Senate and the party. And professor. I take. there is a vast dif-
at last has come the acknowledge- ference between discretion and abso-
ment that Calvin Coolidge dominates lute right.
the party, his appointment of Thomas While the occasion for' this remon-
F. Woodlock as a member of the In- jstrance has been the above refusal,
terstate Commerce commission lYav- that is only one of many objections
ing been approved by an overwhelm- to the institution-the real objection
ing vote in the Senate last week. Ap- is to the general atmosphere pervad-
pointment of the New Yorker removes ing the whole school. The final blue
a storm center which has hung over book rule and the so-called voluntary,
the Senate for a year andhgives indi- attendance rule lead themselvesi
cation that once more the White 'more easily to a verbal discussion:
House resident is master of his party. it is the intangible things that furnish
subconscious emotion against the in-
Several 5,000-year old cups made stitution,-which will be left out.
from ostrich eggs were discovered re- j This so-called voluntary attendance
cently. Suitable dishes for some of 1 rule has as yet had no effect upon my

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA
THIS AFTERNOON: The Boll- I
stelle Players in "Why Not?" by Jesse
Lynch Williams in the Whitney theatre
at 2:15 o'clock.
THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ
Recital in 1Hill Auditorium; at 4:14
oelock.
* * *
THE ST. OLAF CHOIR
The St. Olaf Lutheran Choir, F.
Melius Christiansen, director, will
make its first appearance in Ann Ar-
bor on Wednesday evening, April 7,
in Hill auditorium.
The program which will be given!
will be as follows:
Sing Ye to the Lord ............
...J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Misericordias Domini.........
Francesco Durante, 1684-1755

MAKE
AN N
Good

I

This space reserved for Graham's Book Stores

Gertrude Bailey
Chailes Behymer
~William Bryer
Phillip Brooks
Farnumn Buckingham
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Useph Chamberlain,
ieyer Cohen
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekunst
ikwirew Goodmnan
James T. Herald
ussell Hitt
Miles Kimball
t4arion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
)avid C. Vokes
."arion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

Anthem for two choirs
Penedictus qui venit....Franz Liszt I
From Missa Choralis That
Put Up the Sword.. F. M. Christiansen N one
Yea, Tho Through Death's GloomyO
Vale ... .. . ... .. ..G. Schuma nn I
Anthem for six voices There are n
Come, Guest Divine ....G. Schumann fit. NONEI
Anthem for eight voices SaVe,
From Heaven Above.. Schumann, 1539
A Christmas song for six parts
Whence, Then, Cometh Wisdom..
..-; ... . G. Schreck FACTO
Motet for eight voices
O Sacred Head ....H. L. Hassler, 113 617 Packard
Deck Thyself, My Soul, With
Gladness.....Johan Cruger, 1649
In Heaven Above ..............
.Norwegian Folk Melody
Solo for tenor
Praise to the Lord. Published first time!
in 1668 by Peter Sohren
Choral anthem for double chorus D

's I
Hats
Is iiat We Make.
Better-
many who sell good hats,
BETTER than we make.!
a Dollar ' kMore
at the
RY HAT STORE!
d Street. Phone 7415.

DancingTonight
8-10
Our equipment and music is the same as on Friday
or Saturday nights. You will enjoy the friendly,
congenial crowd, for everyone' is there to enjoy
the two brief hours as much as possible.
Gran ger-Is
9
F H RAND
COLLEGE COATS
SNAPPY SERVICE LE WATERPROOFS

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

1'

I

a
3
4
a
y.

Advertising.............. .Joseph J. Finn{
lvert isi.............sRdolph Rohteman
Advertising. ........... ..... Win. . Mullin
A.vertising.........Thormas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulatio............... .ames R. 1)ePuy
]'uhlic'ation..............Frank R. Dentz, jr.
Accounts........ ........Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

i

George H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Biauer
John i. Bobrink
Sanlv yS. Coddington
W. J, Cox
Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
I] arold Holmes
Os)rcar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F'. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wm. C. Pusch
Natice Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Win. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 1926
Night Editor-SMITtI H. CADY, JR.I
"BOOSTING" MICHIGAN
In these lays when university
alumni associations are being describ-
ed as the banes of modern universi-I
ties, mere scouting organizations for
the procuring of stellar athletes and
the chief factors in the commeri'ciali-
zation of college athletics, it is a wel-
come relief to read of the activities !
of the University of Michigan clubs
in putting constructive Michigan
literature in the high schools .of the
country.
According to the Michigan Alumnus,
33 clubs have purchased copies of
"The University of Michigan," a his-
tory by Wlfred B.'Shaw, '04, and have
placed them in the high school and
public libraries of their respective
cities. These same clubs, and manyj
others subscribe to the Alumnus andj
The Michigan Daily and have the
copies sent to the local libraries;
many even have sets of the Michigan-!
ensian for the use of those interested
in the University.
The ultimate aim of the alumni or-
ganization is to establish, in everyj
Iigh school, a "Michigan book shelf,"
ciontaining books written by Michigan
men, histories of the University, re-
scriptions of Ann Arbor, and files of
University publications - "a place;
where high school students will find
very persuasive proof-and descrip-
tions-of the greatness of Michigan's
state university."
This is ethe type of work for which
aluni assodiations were organized.
The at-ilete.will take care of himself; {
alumni will be doing a great service
to their alma mater by spreading the
story of Michigan among the real stu-

the storage-house fruit.l
Family pride: A five-year old boy ;
in New York city set fire to his home'
in order to see his father, a fireman,}
in action.#
Troublesome consciences: the resi-
dents on Crooks Road, Royal Oak, pe-,
titioin for a change in the name of the.
street.
A law to require a devise on autosj
to limit the speed has been suggested.-
Most Fords are already equipped. i
A Detroit bandit claims the holdup1
he staged was a joke. Maybe the
judge is English.
"Press for Action in Brookhart
Case"-headline. The press always
wants action.
Sir Oliver Lodge is credited with a1
howl-less radio. Ho, hum. Now for
some sleep. }
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
A LAW STUDENT'S ISSUE WITH!
THE INSTITUTION
To the Editor:
There's something strikingly queeri
about a situation wherein a law stu-
dent asks to see her final exam blue.
book and is told flatly that there is an
ABSOLUTE faculty ruling against it.
The statement coining from a law,
professor, I presume he knows where-
of he speaks. On pressing for the
reason, I am told that, if the rule
were otherwise, the time of the fac-.
ulty would be taken by complaints,- !

personal welfare, for up to date
(March 23), I have in over a year andt
a half been absent from but one class
and that during the last year before
the new attendance rule took effect.
(I state that with no particular pride,
but merely to make a point). But I
wish to take issue with the manner in
which the rule is worked out. Onel
would suppose that when a professor
calle upon an absent student either by
mistake or intentionally, there would
be no occasion to make some sort of;
record of it. A notation at such a
moment seems quite ominous, espe-
cially if a person interested in human
nature were to observe the expres-1
sion on the professor's face.1
Again, if the student were presentI
and answered, "Unprepared," one,
can't understand why the professorl
here too uses his pencil. If the rul- I
ing lets him attend classes whenever
he pleases, what difference can it
make to the professor (outside of his
own feelings, but it appears that the
ruling did not take cognizance of
that), that the student has not pre-
pared the last cases of his assign-
inent or even the first ones. There
will be enough people who find it
necessary to prepare their lessons
from day to day, to lend material for
an hour's discussion. One easily can
conceive of a theoretical class room
where, the whole class being absent
voluntarily, the professor might sit
down in a1l his dignity, and engage
in a lively monologue, calling upon
every absentee, and instead of getting
the customary "Unprepared," if un-'
prepared, receive an attentive silence,
after which, he would enter each item
of bookkeeping. And yet that is what
actually happens when a student an-
swers unprepared or when, although
absent, he is called upon., g
It strikes one thht this is an empty
endeavor to compete with certain
rival law schools-and there are many
on the inside who object to the rul-
ing as carried out. Whereas before, $
a student had an opportunity to speak
to the attendance committee, now he
must accept whatever fate the omin-
ous notation holds for him. While
voluntary attendance is most desir-
able and complimentary to the stu-j
dent who has an earnest wish to know
the law as it is, and ought to be, yet I
the rule as carried out subjects him
or her to the use of kindergarten
methods,-which seems highly anti- r
thetical to the connotation in the
words "Voluntary Attendance Rule."'
Here it may be noted that when the
professor's interest is involved, not
the student's, the professor doesn't
stop to think that he is violating not
only the spirit, but also the letter, of
the rule.}

"WHOM GLORY STILL ADORES"
Catherine never kissed a man less4
than six feet. That was the mistake
of the Captain Edstaston in the first
production of "Great Catherine" last
January. In the revival tomorrow
evening in the Mimes theatre Edstas-
ton is barrel-shouldered and as tall as
Prince Patiomkin. The finale for the
first act when Patiomkin drags the
Captain to the queen is in itself a
Sproblem.
Beyond this, there are Catherine'sI
morals to be considered. A woman!
who was a woman!. "Great Cath-
erine," they called her "whom glory
still adores." She had her Prime
Minister Patiomkin, who, after thel
first romantic attachment, developed
into her staunchest friend. He was a
tyrant, ugly, lazy and thoroughly dis-
reputable in his personal habits, but
he had a wild sense of humor that
could laugh, even at himself-and in-
fluence his Empress as none other.;

M
Pi

LEASE
D N'T
AKE
ATHS
N THE

0

I PAY
REST PRICES
For Men's Used Clothing.
Phone 4310 115 W. Washington
H. BENJAMIN
A UTO PA R TS
For All Makes of Cars.
TIRES FOR SALE.
JUNK CARS BOUGHT.
PHONE 3036.
KESSLER B[ , ,Canal Street

ill 4kde,.rO Wi+th
N

CO/l/j aMetz
VariN 5ickers
(YELLOW OR OLIVE)
Sport Coals
(YELOWOR OLIVE)
MWE
*w9

AJ.TOWERCO.
BOSTON
El 1vA S ',

s
325

C1

....
...

r

I

40

.
c
1 1
.
-.,
_ -
i i ro
+ J

Jo College says:
Lilies -- we have them in all sizes

PLANTS
Ililies
Rose Bushes
Darwin Tulipr
iutch Gardens
Primroses
Forget-Me-Nots
Daffodils

CUT
FLOWERS
Darwin Tulips
Roses
F~affolils
Sweet Peas
Sweet Peals
Violets
illes

}
3

Phyllis Loughton
Varinka in "Great Catherine"
Besides this single constant angel, l
Catherine's gallantries provide one of
the lightest and most shocking pages,
in all history. Ideals and reforms
they claimed for her; but it was the
woman in Catherine that attracted
Bernard Shaw-as all of us.
Byron brought Don Juan 'to Cath-
erine; Shaw substitutes a Nordic
Englishman who males a proper fool
of himself and marches proudly with
his virtue to its stainless final cur-
tain. He has written greater plays;
but none suite as funny, as clever and
slapstick, "Great Catherine" is Shaw's
final apology to the William Shake-
speare that wrote "The Taming of
the Shrew."

PHONE 6030

STATE AT LIBERTY

17r ilnhuwr 1np

t
c

the E ' student wouldn't understand+
why he didn't get a D; the D, why lie
didn't get a C; and so on; and the A
would wonder why he got it. I admit
that the time of a law professor ought!

# -
4 _.

...

dens wo beeh lawyrs, docor,
(io s o th nz sc oot -tted ty eor to be, if it isn t, fully guarded,- that F
men engaged in the study' of law and
engineers, and scientists when they justice occupy too important a posi-
graduate, and-not professional ath- tion in the shaping of human happi-
lete's.
ness to be subjected to unnecessary
interference. But, as I pointed out
SOMETlHING FOR 'NOTHIG to the learned professor, he was a
The all-American sport will soon trifle inconsistent, for, the reason of
lie swimming. From the seashore to the rule being to save time, his offer
Ihe creek, young America spends the to sit down and talk over the ques-
summer paddling around in the water. tions with me violated (as we say in
Cities build poos to make up for the I!legal lingo) the spirit of the rule, if
lack of "swimmnin' holes." because not the letter.
they see the advantages in having the There was another reason for his1
healthy citizens that swimming will refusal, in that the American Bar as-
develop. A swimming pool is a neces- sociation, of which every GOOD law
-rv part of the poninment of every school is a member, requires the fil-

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n E
!
t I"
Y
4;
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THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Chiristian, University or-
ganist, will present the following pro-
gram of Easter music this afternoon
in Hill auditorium at four-fifteen
o'clock:
Two Choral Preludes
"When My Last Hour is at
Hand" ................... .. Bach
"0 Sacred Head Once Wounded"
...........................Bach

With some it's the variety,
with others the low prices,
but with all it's the real
excellence of Arcade foods
that makes the big~ appeal!

If I felt that I stood alone in m
general attitude toward the institi

ly
U-

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