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March 25, 1926 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'TIURSDAY, MARCH 25, 1926 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAO% FIVE

STUDENTS Of ALL
NATIONS TO MEEI

Professor Fraiyer To Spea k
Friday NSight

On Inter.

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Y. W. SPONSORS MEET
University students from many na-
tions will assemble as delegates fromI
their respective countries to consider
the major problems of international
concern, at the conference which is to
be held here March 26 and 27 in Lane
hall. The University Y. W. C. A. is
aiding in =arrangements for the confer-I
ence.
The affair is being initiated by the
friendly relations department of the
Student Christian association and
carried on by a general committee of
15 representative students from other
lands as well as the United States.
Dorothy L. Baker, '26Ed., of Eng-
land, and Miss S. Mouliidden, '26, from
Turkey are acting as secretaries of the
executive committee in charge of the
conference. Other members of the
committee are Luis Bustamente, '26,
president, from Bolivia; Alfred Pu,
Grail., vice-president, from China; and
Charles Stevens, '26, publicity chair..
man.
At the opening assembly on Friday
night, Prof. William A. Frayer of the
history department will talk on "The
World Since the War." On Saturday
morning the national groups will meet
to outline and organize their opinions t
concerning their own particular na-t
tioilal problems, and later in thel
morning, there will be a general ses-
sion at. which reports of the group
meetings will be given. At this time I
the topic for the afternoon will be de-_
cided upon: At the afternoon meet-
ing, the topic will be discussed from 1
the political, social, and economic
angles, and later in the afternoon, a
general .discussion will be held with
an attempt to arrive at a conclusion.
At the evening meeting the complete!
findings of the conference will be an-
nounced.
Class buttons are worn on the left
shoulder by freshmen at the Univer-
sity of Southern California. Irreshmen1'
are forbidden to sit on the sophomore
benches or enter the sophomore grove.
SPECIAL
Marcelling, 50c
Shampooing, 50c
Hot Oil Treatment, 75c
Manicuring, 50c
Open Friday and Saturday
Evenings.s
SUNSHINE
BEAUTYPARLOR
Opposite Helen Newberry
432 1UaynhardNIIad 21308

Indoor Gymnasium
Ends Season With
Academic Mcet
Miss Ruth Figge and Miss Laurie
Campbell, of the physical education
department, are in charge of the aca-
demic meet to be held at 4:20 o'clock
this afternoon in Barbour gymnasium,
cloising the regular indoor gymna-
sium season. All freshman and soph-
Iomore women enrolled in gymnasium
classes are expected to be present at
' the meet, and attendance will be
taken. Women entering the meet must
be ready not later than 4:10 o'clock.
Dr. Margaret Bell, of the physical
education department, will act as
starter and the judges of the events,
will be Miss B. Louise Patterson, Miss
Ethel :McCormick, Miss Pauline Hodg-l
son, and Miss Janet Cumming, all of
the department. Miss Annis Hall will
score. Following the meet the sopho-
mores and freshmen will compete in
a volley ball game, refereed by Miss
Figge, and in a basketball game,
refereed by Miss Hodgson.
Freshmen Outplay
Seniors In Game)
With one and a half minutes to
play, Velma Johnson, broke the tin
in the freshman-senior basketball
game played Tuesday afternoon, scor-
ing two points for the freshman team,
and making the score at that time 1
stand 27 to 25. Lucille Mohr, of the1
freshman team then scored one point
with a foul goal, and followed it with
a feld goal, resulting in the final vic- I
tory of 29 to 25 for the freshmen.
Miss B. Louise Patterson, of the physi-
cal education department, refereed the
game.
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW.

LIEUTENANT WILSON TO
DIRECT RIDINS CLASSES
With the advent of spring comes the
announcement of a new series of rid-
ing classes to open April 1, at the fair'
grounds, under the direction of Lieut.
Gareth Wilson, of the R. 0. 'T. C. The
classes, which will be given at 4 and
5 o'clock on Monday and Wednesday,
Tuesday and Thursday, are open to all
women of the University. Second se-
mester sophomores may elect the
course for gymnasium credit. Women
who take the course for credit are re-
quired to ride with the instructor at
I the Fair grounds, but other women
may ride with or without the instruc-
tor, at the fair grounds or not, as
they please. Although the above
classes are the only ones which have
been organized so far, other classes3
will be scheduled if the interest in
1 riding warrants. Tickets are on sale
at Barbour gymnasium at the price of I
1$10 for 12 rides.i
There are at present two women's
riding clubs on campus, Crop andi
Saddle, nd Pegasus. Crop and Saddle
is open to any woman of the Univer-1
sity interested in riding, while Pe-
gasus is an honorary riding organiza-t
tion, to which women are elected by
the members of the society.
One of the prominent events of the
spring sports program will be a horse
show, to be held May 22, at the fair
grounds. At the show, University wo-
men Will compete in various contests
in the field of horsemanship.
-H
Announcement has been made of
the engagement of Sally Walser, '25, to
Finley Riggs, '26. Miss Walser is a
member of the Alpha Phi sorority and
Riggs is a member of the Psi Upsilon
fraternity.

National Meeting
Of Pan-Hellenic
Makes New Rules
At the national conferece of Pan-
Hellenic held recently at Dallas,
Texas a new. con:-itution and set of
rushing rules were adopted. A copy
of both were then fcrwarded to each
of the local organizations to be for-'
mally accepted.
The main point stressed in the new
rushing rules was that henceforth the
period of rushing must be short. In
other respects the constitution and I
rushing rules of the Pan-Hellenic of }
the University of Michigan coincidedf
more nearly with those lately adopted
by the national conference than those
of any of the other local Pan-Hellenic
organizations. Therefore the new
plans necessitate little change in the
by-laws and rules of the local or-
ganization.1
On Tuesday night of next week the
first of the series of exchange dinners,
planned by Pan-Hellenic, will be held.
The object of these dinners is to al-
low the sorority women on campus f o
become better acquainted.
Pan-Hellenic has conceived a plan
whereby in due time each sorority
will have had an exchange dinner with
the other.

The central committee of the Junior
Girls' play will meet at 3 o'clock to-
day in the parlor of Barbour gymna-
sium.
Women who have signed up as be-
ing interested in the Department of
Public Welfare, including the commit-
tees on Education and Child Welfare,
of the League of Women Voters, will
meet for organization at 4:30 o'clock
today in the Athena room on the
fourth floor of Angell hall.
Executive council of the League of
Women Voters will meet at 1 o'clock
today in Newberry hall.
SPECIAL
Each Tuesday and Wed-
nesday
SHAMPOO, MARCEL
AND
BOB CURL
$1.25E
IILI)A ARNST
Bertine Beauty Shoppe
1111 South University Ave.
Phone 35139

;'4i

NOTICES

I0
MAKE YOUR EASTER PREPARATIONS!
We have a full line of Easter baskets and boxes
witli kiddy baskets, 10c to $1.25, and fancy paper
eggs,1 Se to 75c.

OF&

ly

1I

1 f
1 1

The Sport Coat-
Favorite Mode
of Spring
The Sport Coat is very ap-
propriate for Spring. Especial-
ly the distinctive fashions
found in our large- assort-
ments. Exquisitely tailored of
Tweeds, Cheviots, Kashmirs,
Reps, Tapestry and Novel-
ties.
$25 to $69.50

Easter Rabbits and Natural Ducks,
30c to 75c.

All kinds of Easter Novelties of Candies and Favors,
including a full supply of candy Easter eggs.

PARCEL POST SERVICE
715 N. University Place
On the Campus
CLE ELAND

DETROIT

11

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Jacobson
The Shop of Personal Service

I'
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coop.==-2 :i

Large Assortment of Models
Especially Designed for the
College Woman

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A Remarkable Sale of
Latest Silk Gowns
AT

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est

ye
y Border Prints

Georgette

Flat Crepe
Ga
Georgette
New belted effects-a smart fashion
Pleatings, tuckings and smocking ar
portant.
Throw ties are emphasized and vary
$17.95 - $27.50
Millinery
New Hats for Sports or Dress W
arriving daily.
$3.95 - $5.00 - $7.50

$14.75 $19.75 $24.75
Beginning Friday at 2 O'clock and
continuing through Saturday

Combined with Taffeta

/2-inch to 3-inch vidths!
:ontrasting colors.

Often in gay,

WE SHALL OFFER

4.

Women's sizes, 36 to 48%, Misses' sizes,
14 to 20.
$34.95
Coats
Sport - Dress - Cape Backs
All colors and styles.
$17.95 to $49.50

200 Silk Gowns

1

j At prices far below their value. All the new silks are rep-
resented, including GEORGETTES, FLAT CREPES,
T TAFFETAS, PRINTS, 'etc. The popular shades are all
here. Pleated models, flare models, two-piece models,
combinations, etc., invite your attention and all at a saving
to you of a quarter to a third.
Mr. Mills spent last week in New York buying for this sale.
The cold, backward spring made manufacturers anxious to
sell. Remarkable bargains were obtained. Not again this
spring will you find such a buying opportunity. The prices
S willtempt you. If you expect to buy a frock this spring you

- --Am,

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