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March 24, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-24

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PAGE FOURa

1"144 MT(-HTC..&N DATT V

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iL11VLirTL1AYx lYlAICUM u'4, 1.1..;G

I

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
liswed therein.
1, atered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
' iMchigan, as. second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
naster General.
$ubscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phon~es: Editorta%,4g25; tVisizess, ssz.

,;

JIDITOR1JLL ST VY,
T lephone 4821.

MANAGING EDITOR
GEtORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
Pity Editor ........... Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor............Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor............Helen S. Ramsay
J)0ft'r Editor.............Joseph Kruger
f !(cgraph editor..........William Wathour
Mu m au Drama .......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
11.tb "Cady Leonard C. Hall
r DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistaat City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

(ertrude Bailey
t Cartes Behymer
William Bryer
P!Ilr > Brooks
Ifmi'twmBuckingham
5tratnon Buck
r:arl Burger
L ';,z r Carter
SChamberlain
Myr Cohen,
Sltn C.hampe
Doubleday
F1 gcne H. Gutekunst
Q, And rewv Goodmnan
Jamnes T. Herald
Rs l-Hitt
Miles Kimball
Marion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
tanford N. Phelps
'imon Rosenbaum
Vilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith '
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

we do not enhance its chances of ma-
terializing by leaving Europe and her
difficulties alone.
INTELLECTUAL CAFETERIAS
Dr.Glenn Frank, modernist and
freshman president of Wisconsin, has
decided that there is something wrong
with education as it stands today in
our universities. It is that courses
are not properly correlated and that
students follow the easy route into
unrelated specialization. He has, as
yet, no remedy in mind but he has
appointed a committee of seven to
consider all aspects of the work at
Wisconsin, and with its report he
expects to find a solution.
"The elective system has turned
universities into intellectual depart-
ment stores or specialty shops, or in-
tellectual cafeterias," Mr. Frank
says.
He is not in favor of doing away
with the elective system entirely and
reverting to the iron bound cur-
riculum which would be even worse,
but he does believe something should
be done to stop the promiscuous
electing of courses by the undergrad-
uate. The student, he believes, is
taking education in scraps that are
in no way connected, and hence, these
scraps do him no good outside of giv-
ing him a very superficial knowledge
of this and that.
In a speech before a group of Wis-!
consin Alumni he said:.
"Intense specialization: is 90 per
cent inevitable in the modern world
but there are dangers. Specialization,
usually considered the foe of culture
and the friend of science, has dangers
also for science.
"The classics have been killed by
classroom pedants who have forgot-
ten literature in being absorbed hit
the minutiae of their specialty.
As one improving step, he suggest
ed that a body of first class educatois
must be found who would not be awed
by the bulk of knowledge we nqw
have and who would be positively sure
of themselves and their ideas in co-
herently organizing some body of
general knowledge that the studeit
might take which would give him the
correlation he now lacks .
Another remedy he suggests, and
perhaps it is the best, is to get rid of
the "teaching specialist who believes
it is his purpose to put something into
a student's mind rather than to start
something there."
Although Dr. Frank is not entirely
original in his ideas he, at least, i
one of the pioneers in the movement
and deserves credit for being one of
the first to take steps toward putting
his words into practice at his own
university. It is his aim, as he says,
to "institutionalize informality" '0
learning as far as that is possible.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
A LACK OF LOGICI
To the Editor:
Mr. Darrow's lack of logic at yes-
terday's debate was shocking. 'His
ignorance of facts of current history
was revealed when Professor Hudson

EIDE1MI ~lCS

musiC
AND

DRAMA

v

This campus, it seems to us, is fac-
ing another grave crisis. This time
it 'is the shoe selling business. If
things continue according to present'
indications, there will be a local
panic such as has not been seen orl
heard of for thousands of years, at
least:
This is about how things stand.
Some ambitious salesman came out
here and tried to sell shoes. They
didn't go very well, so he adopted this
diabolic method of doing business.
First ydu say to the prospective fish,
"do you want a pair of shoes for
eighty live cents?" and he will natu-
rally say "Yes" thinking that one
cannot get gypped very much for
eighty five cents, since any pair of
shoes are worth a least a nickel and
eighty cents is not so much to lose.
The next step, however, is where
the complexities begin. You then tell
him to pay you $3.40, for which you
give him three coupons. He sells
these each for the same price, $3.40 ofj
which amount $2.55 must be mailed
into the company. The other eighty
five cents he keeps. Thus when he.
has sold the three coupons, he will
get back all but the original eighty
five cents, and with the proper cou-1
pon slips or something gets a pair of
shoes.
But that is only a beginning. The
three people who have the coupons
(let us call them the f-I generation)
each have to sell their three coupons
which you must give them in order to
get their shoes and the people whom
they sell them to (the f-2 generation)
must do the same, and so on and so
on. Not only that, but you who start-
ed the whole business, must also get
three victims before you can get your
shoes. Thus the whole thing can be
started by one person, and spread
r'apildly to alarming proportions.
Addea" ' this is the fact that thus
far we have not seen a single pair of
these shoes around. The situation is
truly alarming. What is going tof
happen is just this. This business
of giving someone the fatal $3.04 and
collecting the same and keep eighty
five is going to spread and spread un-
til everyone is involved. Then it will
have to stop, and the last hundred
thousand (the f-nth generation) will
be stuck and by that time no one will
remember whose money they got or
who they gave theirs too and literally
thousands of dollars will be all in-
volved in a financial frenzy that will
break all local banks and some na-
tional ones. This becomes even more
clear when one considers that in
every three generations, the thing in-
creases by three times the cube ofl
three. That may not be exact mathe-
matically, but it gives you an idea as
to how the thing can spread.
And the worst part of. it, 'as we see
it, is that we ourselves have been in-
volved. Anyone wanting to partici-
pate will kindly write us care of this
office.
*'* *

I. 41 i
TONIGHT: The Junior Girls' play,
"Becky Behave," in the 'Whitney
theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *
"BECKY BEHAVE"
A review, by Robert Henderson.
I cannot write this show. It is too
good.
There is the leading lady-Becky
of the title-who sweeps the house
away. She is a new Minna Miller,
after "The Admirable Bashville," "The
Cradle Song," the old tremulo that
jarred so constantly; and god and
Great Amy alone know how it came
about. It is a strange part for her,
flapper and epigramatic, and she has
grasped it brilliantly. Her voice is
deep and firm, she has flavor and
charm, imate and racy. A beautiful'
girl, graceful, personable, lovely .
my god!
And there is a classic ballet in the;
manner of Degas-a whole pojny chor-I
us in a toe-dance. If this meansI
nothing to you, Mr. Shuter has been
trying for nine years to place such a
number in the Opera, and failed be-
cause of the difficulty. It is the finest
specialty in the performance, and
oddly the director makes the blunder
of refusing ;the chorus an encore in
favor of the negro maid. This is one
of the things to be fixed.

IIt

I .

.,_.
. ......
..._.

p...

7MAKE KSELL
MA N N'Sca
"cA Wiser and Better, Place
to iBay."
Watch for Our New Spring Line.
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415
(Where D. V. It. Stops at State St.)

Granger'
Dancing at
GRANGIFR'S 8-10
Nothing succeeds like success-and the

11 1

1"

_ L',

PLEASE
DON'T

WATCH THIS SPACE FOR ANNOUNCEMENT
OF FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIALS
Craham Book Stores
At Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

popularity of this mid-week dance
continually growing.

Is

I

iv
.: "' .

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2114
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising.................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising.............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Adv3ertising..................Win. L. Mullin
;Alvertising....,.....Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
t';rculation...............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts....................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

MAK E
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS
Paths on snow form ice and kill
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use such paths.
Something New
DeMilo
Milk iMask
Facial Culture-
Ask Us About It.
THE
BLUE BIRD
HAIR SHOP

I

FINISHING YOURPO POTOGRAPH
You take the picture-that is the.most
interesting part anyway-and we will de-

,rI
Grange's ,j

i

velop and print it for you.

Our service is

George H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Bauer
john i1. Bobrink
V. J. Cox
Marion A. Daniel
Nary Flinterrnan
3ames R. DePuy
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
1 larold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose
Frank Mosher

V. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
W s C. Pusch
Joseph D. Hyan
Stewart Sinclair
Mlance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wm. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

prompt and we guarantee the best of

workmanship.

We are conveniently lo-

cated on North University Ave. next to
the Arcade Theater.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24, 1926
Night Editor-LEONARD C. HALL
THE HOUGHTON -REPORTS
Dame Rumour is expected to play a
mean trick on adherents to the United
States entrance into the World Court
before the present Senate session is
ended. Unfortunately, 'reports attri-
bited to Alanson B. Houghton, Amer-
(-on Ambassador to the Court of St.
James, and said to have been circu-

lated by him among the newspaper-
men, have Europe and the League in
a rather messy and precarious posi-
.o:,. Worse still, here in this coun-
y and in Europe the general impres-
on seems to be that Washington not
iy received pessimistic reports from
the ambassador, but allowed the in-
formation to be given to newspaper-
men. But officials at the capitol have
denied any such indiscretions, dis-
crediting even the claim that the
press account of European conditions
was a summarization of what Mr.
!loughton said to President Coolidge
and Secretary Kellogg.
First impressions, however, have at
least one characteristic that is at once
mutual and disturbing, they are last-
ing. And at a time like this, when the
whole country is intently watching
the passing of events overseas, when
public opinion is subtle and plastic,j
ready to be fashioned into the like-
ness of any reasonable mould, such
news, doubtfuly substantiated, can
be a powerful and dangerous tool in
the hands of the right party. One
can, without difficulty, visualize the
glee of the Hearst interests, Borah,
chieftain of the Senate irreconcila-
bles, and his clan; their now silent
huzzas should soon become audible.
No institution can achieve great-
ness without first passing through a'
period of trial rebuffs; once safely
through its worthiness it will have
been proven, its further life insured.
This in view of the fact that now, at
least, there is a chance that the
League is not concerned, would seem
to tndicate that too much weight and
importance' cannot be placed upon
conditions in Europe. Then, this idea
of world peace is far too young, the i
spirit of Locarno, as it has been call-
ed, too new, to permit of a just criti-
Cism.
Non-interventinn ha i onn ncnuoh

reminded him that Serbia requested ODE TO THE FLU
Austria in 1914 to carry the dispute t'd , I
SA t fifst 'it made nice table talk
the Hague Tribunal whereas he hadhMCtusiness about the Flu.
asserted that this was the Allies' sug- But soon it began to stalk
gestion to Germany . He proved to Over night the damn Flu grey
know less of the League of Nations grew.
than a careful newspaper reader II
of Mauch Chunk would know -- At first we though it meant bo
for he omitted the four best The Profs. ought to get hit by
arguments available to a critic But we found we were in for j
of the League of Nations: The Corfu The faculty don't get this new
debacle, France's wars in Morocco III
and Syria and the recent struggle at Our friends all reposed in their
Geneva which ended in Brazil's stupid The attendance at classes wer
veto. Even those who had colds in
Mr. Darrow's attempt to hide his heads
ignorance on the subject of the debate Stayed at home, said they had th
by making witty remarks makes one j Flu.
suspect that he either underestimates IV
the average intelligence of a college Then rumours of long spring va
audience or is so senile that he doesn't Just when everyone seemedt
know when he makes a fool of hint- blue
self. 1 To be blasted by a proclamation
Darrow's inconsistency was appar- To hell with this new true blu
ent when-having flayed our selfish * * *
demands for the repayment of tl e What with the Shoe and Flu
debts-he expressed fear of our join- demics, and a few other thin
ing the organization of 55 states man has to be mighty clever t

w and
Its
it too
olts
flu.
beds
e few
their
e true
cationJ
to be
e flu.
epi-
igs, a
to re-

Lady in the Show
The book itself is campus, and by
comparison very good. The story tells
of Becky who runs a bookstore--the
cinderella woiking girl-and before
the finale there are two pairs of lov-
ers, the complication of a heavy
wager, and a mating-match equal to
. Gilbert. The comedy comes almost in
spite of itself from a clever dovetail-
ing of the lines. The tempo is exact
-wonderful Loomis!-and the lines
themselves grow bright from their
speed alone.
The music is even better. Frankly
'andopenly plagarized from tin-pan's
dairy alley including everything from
Gershwin up to "A Cup of ICoffee, a
' Sandwicht, antd You," most of us
neither know or care how the differ-
ence. The tunes are merry and inti-
mate-enough is enough-and "Tam-
bourine," too, was snitched.
So to the whole atmosphere. Plot
and individual work mean nothing un-
til you have seen the revue itself.
The praise that belongs to the lead-
ing man, Jerry best of all, becomes
extravagant in print; the twins (that
Leland girl!), and the newsboy chorus
with the gum-chewing kid on one end
are so many words. They all make
a remarkable performance, the best I
believe, in years-the Pierrot and
Pierette specialty with its odd flying
exit and Becky most of all.
What matters is the charm of the
piece, its unassuming taste, the simple
costumes and the beautiful garden
set. Nothing is elaborate or preten-
tious. It is, god's truth, a parade of
holy innocence. The make-up is im-
possible, but the girls are so lovely
to look upon . . . young and pretty
and sweet-all the dolly words you
will-that it seems impossible they
should have come from this Gargoyle!
campus.
"GREAT CATHERINE,-
The following cast has been select-
ed for the revival of George Bernard
Shaw's "Great Catherine," to be!
staged by Paul Stephenson, director
of the Ypsilanti Players, and present-
ed in the Mimes theatre Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, April 1, 2 and 3:
Catherine II, Empress of
Russia............Amy Loomis
Patiomkin, the Prime Minister..
.Robert Henderson !
Varinka, his niece.. Phyllis Loughton
Captain Edstadton, the English
ambassador .........Neal Nyland
Claire, his fiancee....Lillian Bronson
Naryshkin, the chamberlain...
..'...'...William Bishop
Princess Dashkoff. .Margaret Effinger
The Sergeant.....Paul Stenhenson

I 1,

.U

1= -
EAifST E R C L E ANSINGw
DO NOT PUT IT OFF UNTIL THE LAST DAY OR SO!
SEND IT IN TO-DAY
We Scientifically and Carefully Cleanse Them in Energine.
The Greatest of All Known Solvents
WE ARE SPECIALISTS IN THIS ART I
of Dry Cleaning Garments.
DIAL 4191
209 SOUTH 4TH AVENUE
CLEANERS WED-
PRESSERS .,dc ALL KINDS
DYERS OF REPAIRING
C. I SCHROEN
[1 1111,
aw

90

Nickels Arcade

Phone 9616

which is trying to bring about co- Imain his normal self these days.

operation. He would have us cancel
the debt which would be an invitation
to increased armaments (especially
for Mussolini) but forbids us to coun-
cil with our debtors at Geneva where
our disinterested suggestions might
lessen the danger of war.
He further contradicted himself by
first saying that only the willingness
of the great powers to combine their
military forces against any nation
that attempts to start a war would
preserve peace and in the next min-
ute asserting that he would not mind
our entering the League of Nations if
it wore in-,t ad h n fr bi- 1- in

Sir Toby Tiffin.
the method of nature. And yet this
old-fashioned gentleman claims to be a
liberal! Ie dislikes the Klu Klux Klan
but thinks its thoughts concerning the'
League of Nations; he rightly ridi-
cules fundamentalism but forgets that
the law of evolution did not stop with
the monkey-man of 1914 nor with the
C. Darrow of 1926 but with or with-
I out the permission of Senator Borah !
& Co. will continue to operate--bring-
ing us into the League of Nations and
the anti-League fanatics into the vol-

The tempting array of eatables
dished out to you pipin' hot
from our steam tables makes
a most favorable impression
with the many who eat here.

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