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March 23, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-23

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PAGE FOUR

THE' MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1926

F

Pub ished every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
:Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of al news
dispatches credited to it or not etherwise
tredited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan,as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
S4iscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial,4 g25; Iuwsaes, *i214.

maker, a molder, a fitter,
chine worker, have come

and a ma-
from Eng-

i j
;,.;

JIDX"TALLLSTAFF,
telephone £U24

I'

MANAGING EDITOR
1W ~ GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
City Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor:...........Manning Housewort
',vinen's Editor...........Helen S. Ramsay
Short's Editor............Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor......William Wathour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

rtrude Bailey
£ ;,arl-s lBehymner
Wifi Bryer
~ ilpBrookst
Soranim Buckingham
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Jseph Chamberlain
Meyer Cohen
aeton Champe
lDouglas Doubleday
ptige 1 H. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
T. Herald
Miles Kimball
1 rion Kubik

iarriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker,
Stanford N. Phelps
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

land on the invitation of The Daily
Mail which is paying all their ex-
penses and their usual salaries while
they are here. Their trip. will include
visits to the larger industrial centers.
As one of them said they are perhaps
the first who really put down their
tools, threw off their overalls, and
came to see American methods of
production for themselves.
The workmen could hardly under-
stand how our industries could pay
higher wages and still undersell the
European market on the same pro-
duct. They expressed great surpriseI
at what they considered close co-
operation between operator and
worker. They were apparently
astounded at the high wages which
they attributed to mass production
and standardization as against 'their
English theory of good workmanship
based upon the individual.
Undoubtedly the men will carry
back valuable ideas gleaned from the
trip to their employers and fellow1
workers. If they can materially as-I
sist in the application of the better
features of American industrial
methods to their own individualistic
system when they return, then their
mission will have been a successful
one and the Daily Mail be commended
for sponsoring the project.
"Wilbur Gets Report On Cocktail
Party"-Free Press headline. From
General Butler's statements, we judge
that Colonel Williams got more than
that-or will.
Greatest selling slogan on earth:
"Tax Reduction Effective Now."
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
PORTO RICAN POLITICS
In The Daily of March 18 we read
what purports to be an interview of
a native student as to a possible
revolution in Porto Rico. He claims
an uprising unlikely. I happen to be
one of the odd fish cast up by the
Caribbean Sea on that island, ad
call it my home.
Mr. Amadeo states that "the island
does not want her independence." In
this he is grossly mistaken. Porto
Rico wants her independence because
the United States has not shown pro-
per guardianship over her possession.
The people are disgusted with the
governors appointed by the. President
for a four year sojourn on the island.
They charge 'the present governor
with letting crooked politicians get
away with their money.

n O.LL
VASTED f
TARIOUS
CO11 b113NIC.1-
TIO1ti S

AND
DRAMA

11

1.

. ,.~
:'I
I.'4_'.

Nelson Library

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 1i14
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

i. .1

MUSIC

11

Friday and Saturday Special

.
k ;

Due to the weather conditions pre-f
valent in these parts, all classes for1
the week should be cancelled in
order to save other students from get-
ting grippe, according to reports is-
sued by E. Hamilton Mipp, noted crew
mentor.
. "So many students have it now," he
said, "that it would seem as if it
would hit even the faculty soon. In
this case so many classes would have'
to be given bolts that the morale of
the entire student body would be ruin-
ed. In order to avoid this the only
thing to do is to stop all classes until
the weather clears off. (And pray for
a week of rain.-Editor's note) This
seems the only sane thing to do."
A WIRE
SIR TOBY TIFFIN
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
WHY NOT PUBLISH A VOTE
OF THANKS FOR THE BETA
GAMMA BOYS (M1fEMBERS OF
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS DE-
PARTMENT) FOR MANNER IN
WhICh THEY HAVE GAPPED
RAGING TORRENTS ON, CAM-
PUS. STOP WONDERFUL SUS-
PENSION AND CANTILEVER
BRIDGES It A V E PROVED)
GREAT AIDS IN FACILITATING
PASSAGE OF PEDESTRIAN
TRAFFIC. STOP.
HATS OFF TO THE BETA
GAMMA BOYS.
(SIGNED) NICK.
* * *
HIS CAREER
"I feel that that I have been vindi-
cated," said the Majestic bandit,
whose name is withheld for diplo-
matic reasons, when interviewed yes-
terday by a Rolls' reporter in regard
the ballot taken by rhetoric classes re-
cently. The vote showed that out of
97 students only 27 hope that the
hold-up man will be caught.
"As for the 39 that said they didn't
care whether I was caught or not,
I feel it my duty to society to con-
vince them that I deserve my free-
dom. It seems that the "sob sisters"
haven't spread enough oil in this
neighborhood. Do these students re-
alize that I have served ten years of
apprenticeship in the small town and
am now ready to enter "big time"
work in Chicago? Would they have
my career, nipped in the bud? A per-
fect futute spoiled by the Ann Arbo'r
police force? No! Never!"
The bandit denied that he believed
that any of the police force would
have voted in sympathy with him had
the ballot been a city wide one. "I
would say, from their actions," he
said, "that they would have voted in
the don't care group."1
* * *
Dear Tiff:
Well, we were wrong about "Why
Marry." It is just a common ordinary
satire on home life, as I saw it. No
dread influences at work there. But
you were absolutely in error when
you insinuated that I wrote you that
letter to give the dam' show more
publicity. What, I ask you, what in-
terest should I have in a coed organi-
zation's dramatic activities? I, whose
extra curricular work has been limit-
ed to writing contribs for Rolls?
But to return to the subject of the
first play ever to receive the Pu
litizer Prize. I wrote you that last
letter, as I want to emphasize, in a
purely campaigning spirit. My re-
marks were misinterpreted, so I
withheld further comment until after

a

Advertising................ Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..........Fra R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising...............Wm. L. Mullin
Adveitising .........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
rculation............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts...................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

"reorge 1. Annable, Jr.
kV' Carl Bauer
J hn H. Bobrink
J. Cox
Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Jamues R. De'luy.
Stan Gilbert
T. 'Kenneth Haven
l"arol Holmes
Frank Mosher

F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wmn. C. Pusch
Joseph 1). Ryan
Stewart Sinclair
Mance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wmn. J. Weinman
; rgare' Smith
Sidney Wilson

TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
THE POSTAL .CENSORS

TONIGHT: The Junior Girls' play,
"Becky Behave," in the Whitney
theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
r * *
THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review, by Charles Dearing.
The Sunday afternoon concert was
full of surprises-a large audience,
a caprice, an aria, and even a piano
concerto. The word "band" ordi-
narily conjures up in our minds, ideas
of blatant and brassy noises, but the
Michigan band performed its part of
the program with a minimum of va-
grant squawks and incongruous toots.
With some little coaxing Mr. Wilson
brought the players safely through
the less bombastic selections, but re-
ceived more spontaneous response in
the characteristic military airs, espe-
cially in the March, "United Amer
ica."
Mrs. Konold's singing of the Aria,
"Depuis le Jour" from "Louise" acted
as a shock absorber for the band se-
lections, and her group of lighter
songs completed the synthetic nature
of the program.
Another surprise came in the form
of an old subje.t performed in a novel
way. There seems Yo be more genuine
melody in the "Poet and Peasant"
Overture than in any of its companion
pieces, and Stewart Churchill with
his marimbaphone succeeded in find-
ing 'more of that melody than is
brought out by the ordinary musician.
, To complete the program, there was
a Beethoven-Liszt Fantasia from
"Ruins of Athens," arranged for mili-
tary band by Wilfred Wilson, with Al-
bert Lockwood playing the piano con-
certo. Needless to say, Mr. Lock-
wood's playing was delightful.
For some reason I still associate
bands with football games and circus
parades.
* * *
THE CRTIClS
The reviews of the Junior Girls'
play, "Becky Behave," which opens
this evening in the Whitney theatre,
will be written as follows;
Tuesday evening, Robert Hender-
son; Wednesday evening, Norma
Mansfield; Thursday evening, Calvin
Patterson; Friday evening, Leonard
Hall.
AMEN!
The following criticism, published
in the March 20 issue of The Bill-
board, will be of interest to the boy's
many Ann Arbor friends (quotha!):
IIONEL (MIKE) AMES
"Unlike most other acts o its na-
ture, this one does not keep the iden-
tity of the player a secret. He comes
out first 'in person'-that is, a the
engaging, handsome and , pershable
young man that he is. In a brief in-
troductory talk he informs the audi-
ence that he left the University of
Michigan, where he played 'leading
lady' in the varsity shows, while
studying engineering, to go on the
stage.
"While Mike, as he came to be
known to all Ann Arbor, is changing,
a short film is exhibited in which he
is shown as various types of female
movie actresses. Though the gowns
in this short picture were beautiful,
and the makeup most realistic, they
are all surpassed, nevertheless, by the
numbers in the offering that followed.
It would take a woman reviewer to
do justice to the description of the
various gowns. All a poor masculine
writer can say is that they were
gorgeous-and then some!
"Lest one get the impression that
he depends upon the exhibition of his
wardrobe to get by in vaudeville, it
must hastily be added that the gowns
are only a means, together with his
mannerisms and bearing and makeup
in general, of putting across some
really high class impersonations,
which, in themselves, were entertain-

ing. His voice is kind of weak, yet,
withal, carries the semblance of
femininity and the songs are all very
well sold.
"Paul Bernard, accompanying atI
the piano, does a few 'good numbers
himself, one a popular song, which
also gets a good hand. He is also
a good straight for Ames in getting
some good comedy over. They havej
some pretty clever lines in their pat-I
ter, and Mike has a sense of comedy
which stands him in good stead.
"The setting is splendid, making a
good background for the many gowns!
seen in the course of the act. An
offering that has all the ingredients of
a big time turn."

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

SKILLED REPAIRING
ALL MAKES
If your pen works badly, consult a pen specialist at
Thi P nnospial
315 State St.
Our hospital is fully equipped and our skilled operators
never lose a case. Consultations free.

K1

Ruder's Pen Shop

Osteopathic Physicians Dial 7451
Drs. Bert and Beth Haberer
Corner William and Maynard
Ann Arbor, Mich.

- - - Burt's Pocket Classics
Lambskin Libraryr
More than 300 Titles
at Special Prices
Grahams Book Stores
At Both Ends of the Iaigonal Walk

REAL SERVICE

"MADE FOR YOU"
YOU'VE BEEN PLANNING TO HAVE A
NEW SUIT FOR SPRING. WHY NOT
ORDER IT IN TIME FOR EASTER? THE
NEW, ATTRACTIVE MATERIALS ARE
HERE - THE PRICES REASONABLE
n o
nC WILD., 109b.Washintan
(Above Lufg's Shoe Store)

i

1

Paths on snow
all grass roots
don't make or

form Ice and kill
beneath. Please
use such paths.

]Grangier's

- R

I

mm.

After being in circulation for 2,000 ; talcLsoUthieet siuati
z, rs, the poems of Ovid have been are these:-the island is gove'rned by"
0eclared obscene and barred from the I the Jones Act, which provides a bud-
mails by Baltimore postal officials, get from the Porto Rican treasury of
They have seized and sent to Washing- $11,000,000 yearly. The native legis-
ton an English translation of "The lature recently appropriated $15,000,-
Love Books of Ovid," which a profes- 000-and Governor Towner signed the]
s.or at Johns Hopkins university had E bill. Now the natives admit that theirI
ordered from England. legislators made a mistake. They
Ovid has passed the censorship of 'grant that their legislators cannot beI
time, but couldn't quite make the expected to govern them without the
gr~ade when he ran up against theaid of the Governor. Thus they throw!
Baltimore officials. Several transla- the entire responsibility on the latter,
Lions of the poems are contained in and denounce him for not vetoing the
the Library of Congress, the Johns bill. The administration is in heavy
Hopkins library holds a shelf of them, debt, taxes are high and the people
and copies are located in university refuse to pay them.
libraries generally,-yet the United My countryman admits that "more
States mails must not carry them. than 80 per cent of the land is in the
Postal officials who set out to cen- hands of outsiders." Precisely. That
sor the classics will have a difficult is one of the things the Party de-
job on their hands. For instance, manding independence is protesting
would the officials have barred the against. It is the dream of the "in-
original work, if they couldn't read I dependistas" to prohibit non-residents
Latin? And when a Greek master- from owning land. This can be
Lati? An whn a ree maser-achieved only through independence.1
piece comes into the office, who is go- Thevery tcofga sngnde-
. The very existence of a strong Inde-
lug to investigate it to see if it is
unsuitable for transportation in the pendence Party proves the prevailing
same mail car with the "Scorching sentiment. E. lMontgomery Reily,,
samres malarit tPresident Harding's Governor from
a! c.ries Magazine?7" Kna iy elzdti etmn
Postal officials would do well to Kansas City, realized this sentiment
sick to censoring modern literature and knocked it in the head. On his
1 arrival on the island- he "cleaned up
wi to breaking up swindle schemes, h crooked politics" by replacing
laving the classics to the retired lifethcrkdpoics byrpang
lnative office holders by Continentals.
they live. As judges of fake pro- lie temporarily quelled the feeling-for'
moters who try to use the mails, the H
much worthy independence, but it finally welled
post office has donemuhwryI up again .and resulted in his being
work. And when - they limit their recaled by Presetd ings e
1i erary censorship to modern works, ucceed b Pres e M. e
wtas succeeded by Horace 11. Towner,
they are performing a necessary whose leniency has resulted in the{
ts.But when they get into the
present crisis. The trouble has been
field of ancient classical literature,'i broiling since E. Mont. Reily replaced
they must realize that other consid-
. . native office holders by continentals
t-rations inter in than just the ma- three and a half years ago.
terial in the publication. The idea of From their mixed Spanish and In-
a professor deprived of a classical dian ancestry the natives inhet
research work by action of the post the restless hot-headedness on the
office is not in harmony with educa- one hand and the love for freedom
tional ideals. That which has stood n
on the other, When ex(citedl and
the test of time should be able to roused by a leader, they become wildI
lass postal regulations. i a....-. l, -
cl±r iic. v yuuvro

CABARET DANCING
at
JOE PARKER'S
CAFE
TONIGHT
No Cover Charge
6:30 to 10:30
Formal Opening
Music by Six Piece Orchestra

DANCING-.
TOMORROW NIGHT
8-10
and every
Wednesday 8-10
Friday 9-1
Saturday 9-12

.f!

i

Grantger's

a

r

4-

A dignified business

l
I

the run was over. I now place my
seal of approval on it in case it is
ever revived. It doesn't have the
slightest sinister effect on marriage
and the home. It will not be neces-
sary to bring the reformers in. Butl
you never can tell what will happen
next. YIFNIF.
* * *
ECONOMICS BUILDING
FOUND BY EXPEDITION
Ann Arbor, U. S. A. The Earth.
Special to Rolls)-Buried under 20
feet of sand, the Economics building
of the university which existed here
centu'ries ago was discovered by Rolls'
Own Expedition today. The frame
building was in a well-preserved
state, despite its wooden construc-
tion.
Although the roof had caved in,
and the walls were leaning at a dan-
gerous angle, the building is believed
to be in about the condition it was
when deserted by the university in
2014.
Our historian with the expedition
believes that this building is typical
of the university structures of that
day. The finding of this prominent!
building in such a poor condition
proves, it is believed, that architec-
ture in the 21st century was in a very

Any retail business that has grown to a volume
of more than $100,000,000 a year must be
founded upon sound.business principles.
Kresge's is a dignified business. It meets the
everyday human needs-of folks everywhere.
The S. S. Kresge Company has developed the
art of retail store-keeping to the point where
it may well be termed a science. Merchandise
of standard grade is sold in Kresge stores-but
in such quantities that prices are consistently
lower than in stores that lack the organization
and resources of a great national institution.
There are already more than three hundred
stores in the Kresge chain- and new ones are
being added constantly. For these new stores
we shall need managers-competent men,
thoroughly experienced -and Kresge-trained.
A limited number of young men-college men
of good character and promise-will be given
the opportunity to train for these positions.
Write at once and arrangements will be made
for you to meet a man from your own college
who is now a Kresge representative. He will
give you complete information.

t

I

STUDENTS OF INDUSTRY
It has long been the custom of
continental industries to send th
leaders to the United States for
express purpose of studying prod

yening maniacs. When Govezrnor
Reily returned to the states a cargo;
of tobacco was set afire in the for-
the ward hold when the ship was two'
hei'r days out at sea. Recently, when Gen-I
the eral McIntyre, U. S. Chairman on
uc- Committee of Insular Affairs visited

* * *
"LE PAQUEBOT 'TENACITY"'
As the final production of their
eleventh season, the Ypsilanti Players
under the direction of Paul Stephen-
son opened last evening for a week's

HARRY W. REPPERT
from newsboy to
Kresge Store Manager
When a boy, Mr. Reppert attended
school in Reading, Pa., where he
sold the Saturday Evening Post to
earn spending money.
Later he attended Wharton School
of Accounting and Finance.Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. Mr.. Reppert
has this to say of hisbusiness career:
"I became acquainted with a Kresge
store manager and heard the story
of the Kresge plan of 'intensive
training on a practical scale. After
a weeks' deliberation, I started in
training.
"Remember this: I held "a good

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