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March 20, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-20

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aHFaMT a vTaN DAvT! Vr

. 1 4+ 3.41! 3"1 1 ! 1Ti L'1141,/11 L V Sit 'W V

Published every morning except Mbnday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conterence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
Wtild to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
,shed btherein.
.Centered at the postoflice at .Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
master General.
Subscription by carrier. $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices;eAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
nard :,,Street.
'hones: Editorl, . 442; business, sitlt4.

XDWTTOU1AL STAFF,
olo phione 4924

p
a

,,,

MAANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. 'DAVIR
r ;, ir ar, Editorial Board.... Norman I. Thal
Ci1 .itor...>....Robert S. Mansfield
t...........Manning Housewortb
Helen S. .Ramsay
...........Joseph Kruger
kp Ei~l ditor..........William Waltbour
u and Drama........Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
a'rit . Cady Leonard C. Hall
t. T. De ore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
iX Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Ntiude Bailey
?es Behymer
William Bryer
-!:iHfitBrouks
Varnuin Buckingham
'Srrtton Buck
u'ad Burger
iJar Carter
Chamberlain
t.-,hen
Doubleday
- -Gutekunst.
-nan
iKumball
!4TijflKubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
tanford N. Phelps
imon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising ...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
advertising................Wm. L. Mullin
lvcrising..........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
.reulAtion..............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts...................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

'eorge H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Bauer
John Tf. Bobrink
b'. -. Cox
~Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinternan
James R. DePuy
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
1 ' Irlj Hoilmes
Oscar A. Jose
Frank Mosher

F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
Djavid Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Win. C. Pusch
Joseph D. Ryan
Stewart Sinclair
Mance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Wm. J.. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

tages which might be brought up.
The plan is not a panacea for the
whole freshman problem, but it is the
best known method of getting the new
man started right.
COL. JOHN C. COOLIDGE
With the death of Col. John C. Cool-
idge has occurred the passing of one
of the older generation of simple-liv-
ing, stern, kindly people that are New
England's men.
Living all his life on a little farm
in the New England hills, Colonel
Coolidge was thrust into national
prominence when his son, Calvin, suc-
ceded to the Presidency upon the
death of President Harding in August
of 1923.
Not many of the 29 men who were
fathers of Presidents who have lived
to see their sons inducted into the
highest of public offices, and among
those who did, Colonel Coolidge had
the distinction of being the only one
to administer the oath of the Presi-
dential office to his son. It was more
because of this than the mere fact
that he was the father of the Presi-
dent that caused the attention of the
nation to be directed to him.
Colonel Coolidge remained the same
resolute, taciturn, and keen-minded
man he had always been after his son
became President, living conformity
to the simple traditions that have
marked the lives of the Vermont
Coolidges for many years. Even after
his son became the occupant of the
White House, the father, though he
made frequent trips to Washington,
(always appeared glad to get back to
his little farm and to resume ' the
rigorous routine to which he had been
accustomed for so long.
The nation joins the chief executive
in mourning the passing of a great
and righteous soul.
A dog in the East has been found
not guilty of murdering a cat, the
court declaring an automobile re-
sponsible. Now does ,the driver get
the death penaly as was demanded for
the dog?
A New York Times headline says,
"19 Railroads Bolt Executives' Group
on Rail Labor Bill." Looks like
things weren't made interesting
enough for them
CAMPUS OPIN4ON
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
PAINTED DIFFERENT COLORS
To the Editor:
The Daily of the 17th carried a
very lengthy letter, by one Mr. Pol-
lins, that strikes me as being ex-
tremely unfair. I feel that it should
not go unchallenged. In that letter,
the author attempted to "eradicate
the false black spots" that he claims
Mr. Maurer painted in his lecture
on the coal situation. And how does
he do it? Only by the use of the most
specious arguments and the falsest
illustrations. Here are some of them: I
To prove that the conditions in the
mining fields are not so bad, Mr. Pol-
lins advances the startling fact that
the miners-happy souls-actually
are sorry for those who have to live
in the hot and crowded cities. From
this great truth, Mr. Pollins deduces
that the miners lot therefore, must
be a happy one. Or to follow Mr. Pol-
lins-the frog in the pond laughs at
the frog on the muddy bank--ergo
the frog in the pond is the most
blessed creature alive. The subtlety
of this reasoning not only astounds
but bewilders me.
But that is not all. With yet greater

seriousness, the author, to prove thel
munificence and kindness of the coal
operators in caring for the miners,
tells us that the "companies are now1
painting their houses different col-
ors." What generosity! What bene-
ficence! Evidently Mr. Pollins sin-
cerely believes. "if you cover the sur-
face you cover all."
Again, with equal zeal we are told
the miners who work for the H. C.
Frick company live in towns that "arej
quite desirable settlements hidden by
rows of shade-trees planted along ther
roadways and in the yards." Really,,
this reads like an ad in a Florida
newspaper. And frankly, I never,
have seen any such settlements built
for miners and their families. And,I
like Mr. Pollins, I can also claim the
doubtful honor of "always having
lived in the heart of the bituminous
coal field."t
However, Mr. Pollins finally shows
us that the miners do accumulate
great wealth-unheard of riches-in,
fact, he reminds us that lie knowsI
"quite a few miners who have at in-

Great regret is exhibited and ex-
pressed on every hand at the fact that
the vacation will not be changed, and
worse yet that another will not be
added. A majority of those who have
expressed opinions in the matter state
that as long as there has to be an
epidemic, they don't see why some-
one shouldn't get something out of
it. Of course, this excludes the doc-
tors.
But, you see, some eight or nine
years ago the Regents, God bless 'em,
set the dates for all spring vacations
for dozens of years ahead. Now the
Regents are the Regents, and their
word is law. It is as hopeless to try
to advance the date of a spring vaca-
tion as it is to change the time of the
next full moon. And even the moon
is moveable, they say.
4So the world will go, epidemics
come and go, but the date set by the
Regents for spring vacation will go
on forever.
* * *
WEST LYNNE
SCENE-The Old Homestead. I
TIME-What's the difference.
(Wind and rain without.)
Father-What a terrible night to be
abroad.
Little Nell-Yest father thank God
I'm not abroad.
Father--Today the mortgage on
the farm is due and if we can't pay,
the wicked squire wilf foreclose.
Mother-But we haven't any money.
Father-No we haven't any money.
Dear me, if we only had Jack.
Little Nell-Oh, father, tell me
about Jack.
Father-Well, little Nell, Jack is
your half brother. Twelve years ago
we gave your brother Jack twelve
cents and told him to go out and buy
a herring. Even since nothing has
been seen of Jack or the herring.
Little Nell-Goodness if we only
had Jack.
Tather-Yes daughter if we only
bad Jack.
(Knock on door)
Mother-There's someone at the
door father. Se who it is.
(Father goes to door and upon
opening it a stranger confronts him.)
Stranger-It is cold and stormy
without. May I have food and shel-
ter?
Father-Come in stranger. We
haven't very much but what we have
you are welcome to.
Mother-Come father let us get the
stranger some food.
(They exit.)
Stranger-Tell me little girl what
is your name?
Little Nell-My name is Nell, but
they call me little Nell for short.
Stranger-Have you lived here all
your life little Nell?
Little Nell-No sir, not yet.
(Father and mother Teneter with
food as knocking is heard on door.)
Father-Come in.
(The wicked squide enters.)
Father-Welcome squire.
Squire-You know I'm not welcome.
I am here for the mortgage money.
Father-But squire, the crops have
been poor and-
Squire-Have you the money? If
you haven't why then (glancing at
little Nell) ahem-ahem-
Father-Squire you ain't done right
by our Nell..
Mother--Nd squire you ain't done
right by our Nell.
Stranger--No squire you ain't done
right by their Nell.
Squire-Very well then I'll have my
money.
Stranger-(jumping to his feet and
throwing two cents in squire's face)
Here's your damn money. Go before,

EDROLLS
r//~/gr

1,
I

SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKAJ
FRESHMAN WEEK
Perhaps the greatest problem of the
modern university is that of making
ideal for the student the transition t
rgm high school life to that of the
college campus. At the present time
the change is far too difficult, there
is a sharp break from the old life to
the new. In the past few years, how-
ever, there has been notable progress
in the efforts of college authorities to
remedy the Tituation. One of the most
widely advocated and successful
methods of bridging the gap between
high school and college life is that
of conducting a "Freshman Week"
before the opening of school to ac-
quaint the new man with his sur-
r oandings, his future work, and the1
c : Tms and traditions of his univer-
President Little, in his inaugural
sa';ss brought out the problem of!
shI 'rc slinan and his confusion onI
iiariculation. He advocated the adop-
tion of "Freshman Week" for two
rejsns: first, that the entering man;
ma better appreciate his college;
and second, that the college may bet-
i (Ider nd the freshman.
The plan, as suggested, would re-
,; i ' ~Im freshman report one
week before the opening of school.
0 uring this week, the new men would I
be divided into groups of not more1
lh' i V0m1 y, under the leadership of
a faculty advisor. They would be
shown efficient methods of studying,j
take physical and intelligence tests
wbich would be an index as to the
type studies they could best pursue,
haive social affairs of a type that
would acquaint them with their class-
si t tttid perhaps be prepared to
withstand the rushing attempts of re-
turning fraternity men.
The results should be fewer cases I
of homesickness, the formation of
'tegula? habits, and the intelligent se-
lection of introductory courses. And
if the long needed freshman dormi-
tories become a reality in the not too,
distant future, they will not only aidi
in the solution of this problem, but,
materially help in the formation of
lasting friendships among all groupsf
of students.
The fact that the plan has been
tried out and found workable at othera

TODAY: Masques Present "Why
Marry?" by Jesse Lynch Williams in
the Mines theatre at 2:15 and S:5
o'clock.**
" S. S. GLENCAIRN"
The Mimes' production of Eugene
O'Neill's cycle of sea plays, "S. S.
Glencairn," is now being cast and
will go into rehearsal Monday even-
ing at eight o'clock. The role of
Cocky, the English cockney sailor,
however, has not yet been filled, and
Mr. Shuter is anxious to consider any
student, preferably a native English-
man, who cares to try out for the
part. The character has exceptional
opportunities, and the only necessary
requisite is a convincing cockney ac-
cent. All men interested in the role
are asked to report to Mr. Shuter at
his office in the Mimes theatre either
today or Monday.
THE UNIVERSITY BAND
The University Band under the di-
rection of Wilfred Wilson and with
Grace Johnson-Konold, soprano, as
soloist will present the following pro-
gram at the Faculty Concert tomor-
row afternoon in Hill auditorium at
4:15 o'clock:
March, "On the Mall"......Goldman
Caprice, "Moon Madrigal"....Willeby
Characteristic, "In Ole Arkansaw"
.Zimmerman
Aria, "Depuis le jour" from
"Louise"..............Carpentier
Mrs., Konold
Waltzes, "The Co-Eds of Michi-
gan" (new) ...............Sousa
To the Faculty and Studens of the
University of Michigan
March, "United America........
............Weber-Delamarter
Mariambaphone Solo, Overture
"Poet and Peasant".......Suppe
Selections from "The Student
Prince" (In Heidelberg).Romberg
Arranged for Military Band by
Wilfred Wilson
Wings of Night ............... Watt
IA Memory .................. Gang
The Answer...............Terry
Mrs. Konold
Fantaisia from "Ruins of
Athens" ........ Beethoven-Liszt
Arranged for Military Band by
Wilfred Wilson
THE CLEVELAND SEASON
The Metropolitan Opera Company
from the'Metropolitan Opera House,
New York, will present its third sea-
son of grand opera in Cleveland from
Monday, April 26 to Wednesday, May
5 in the Cleveland Public Auditorium.
The entire tour is under the manage-
metiof Guillo Gatti-Casazza, and the
detailed repertoire will be as follows:
Monday evening, April 26-Giorda-
no's "La Cena delle Beffe" with Gigli,
Tibbett, and Alada; and Leoncavallo's
"Pagliacci" with Bori and Martinelli.
Tuesday evening, April 27-Mous-
sorgsky's "Boris Godunoff" with Cha-
hlap in.
Wednesday evening, April 28-Pon-
chielli's "La Gioconda" with Ponselle,
Gordon, and Lauri-Volpi.
Thursday evening, April 29-Gou-
nod's "Romeo et Juliette" with Bori,
Gigli, and Tibbett.
Friday evening, April 30.-Saint-
Saen's "Samson et Dalila" with Gor-
don and Martinelli.
Saturday afternoon, May 1-Doni-
zetti's "Lucia de Lammer moor" with
Talley and Lauri-Volpi.
Saturday evening, May 1-Puccini's
"La Boheme" with Gigli, Scotti, and
Bori; and Mascagni's "Cavallieria
Rusticana" with Ponselle and Toka-
tyan.
Monday evening, May 3-Verdi's
"Rigoletto" With Galli-Curci and
Lauri-Volpi.

Tuesday evening, May '4-Masse-
net's "Don Quixote" with Chaliapin
and Easton.
Wednesday evening, May -Verdi's
"Aida" with Ponselle, Claussen, and
Martinelli.
Tickets for single performances are
priced from seven dollars to one dol-
lar, and may be ordered by mail up
tio March 31 of the Cleveland Metro-'
politan Opera Committee, Philip!
Miner, treasurer, The Dreher Piano
Company 1226-36 Huron Road, Cleve-
land, Ohio.
"WHY MARRY"
A review, by Montgomery Butchart.
After one has said that the play was'
unusually or extraordinarily well
cast, ditto directed, ditto interpreted
and acted, there's really only this
good news to add: there are to be
two extra performances, tomorrow
afternoon and evening. After all that
had been said about Miss Bronson,
and Mr. Davies it was more than a
pleasant surprise to find others
worthy of high praise, particularly
Mr. Dale Shafer, in the part of John,

PLEASE
DON'T
PATHS H
ON-TH
CAMPUS
Paths on snow form lee and kill
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use suich paths.
EAT REGULARLY
AT THiE
Bluebird Cafeteria
209 South Ingalls
Special Sunday
Chicken Dinners
Strictly home cooking.
"The best placeshto eat
are home and here."
NALOTHE

r~
t

(i

11

Low

Duco

I It I

MUSIC
AND

.

ESTABLISHED 1818
MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET
NEW YORK
Our representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER
Detroit
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
March 22, 23 and 24
with Samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
for Spring

Friday and Saturday Special
Nelson Library - - - Bi

1.

v.

11

°..O/.o. ," ,t./."l/".'J.J ri.E. ..@OO/.3.C'O@OOC§OO@ CO@§@O@OOO

The Four Piece sport
sack is an accepted
part of every man's
wardrobe -... and as
tailored by us it has
the established ap-
proval of well-dressed
men.

t '}
q ,
.
fit

8 O S TON
LITTLE BUILDING
TamomaT con. BOYLSTON

PALM BEACH
PLAZA BUILDING
c 0 U N T Y R OA D

VNEWPORT
AUDRAIN UUILDI G
220 13TLLEvu% Avzntw

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man

COLLEGIATE CLOTHES

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use force.
Squire-Bah-foiled.
Father-But who -are you.
Mother-Yes, who are you
Little ell-Yes indeed,

NEXT SHOWING
Fri. sn" a t, March 26 & 27
Place of i.l..+ v to beannouncc d
later
Nat LUXENBERG & Bro.
37 Union Square, New York
21 Between 16th & 17th Sts,
RAKE
MANN'c
Would a H atter be a
Boot-black???1
Then Why Expect a
Boot-black to be a
Hatter?.
Dont have a good
hat RUINED by
leaving it in un-
skilled bands to
be CLEANED
and BLOCKED.
We do only

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A NL
u-
C 2421

SHOP
ITS

!t

and
TO PCOATS
for
SPRING

Fir

Sul

I

stranger?
stranger?
who are

you stranger?
Stranger-I am Jack.
Nel--(falling into stranger's arms)
Jack.
CURTAIN
NICK.
* * * *
WANTED
If I only had a hundred million dol-
lars
And a champagne fountain spark-
ling at my feet
And a hundred waiters waiting at my
table
And Sousa's band aplaying while I
eat.
If I only owned a Western Union

I

A

e

terest ten or twelve thousand dol-
la'rs," but that only "as a result ofa
discreet living." Imagine it, ten or
twelve thousand dollars, the life sav-
ings of not one, but of a whole family,
which in fact amounts to the price of
a half decent home with a few furnish-

7

cable
If Gilda Grey would
bride
If I only owned the
railroad
I'm sure that I'd be
fled.

only be my
Pennsylvania
almost satis-
NICK.

Spring Suits and Topcoats that will
appeal to you. We are able to offer
these specially tailored garments from
R. & W. at such a bargain because of
what we save in rent:

High
Work.

Class

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