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March 19, 1926 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-19

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PAGE TWELVE "f

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAICIT 19, 1926

Sees

North Lake States
As Rich Man's Paradise

St. Paul, March 17, (AP)-Unless
the state and national governments
show more interest in acquiring the
low-priced and attractive forest areas,
northern sections of the lake states
may become ,a rich man's paradise, in
the opinion of Dr. Raphael Zon, di-
rector of the Lake States forest ex-
periment station here.
With clubs, promoters and individ-
uals in Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee
and other large cities buying up large#
areas of cutover lands near lakes for
country clubs and hunting preserves,
D'r. Zon fears that "a large portion
of the lake states wilderness will be-,
come a closed private hunting and
recreation ground, and the people will
be the losers."
"Within the last few months," he
said, "One well known Chicago club
bought 40,000 acres in the northern
part of Michigan for a hunting pre-
serve. Another tract of timber has
just been rcently purchased, a mem-
bership of 600 people secured and
enough money subscribed to pay for
the land, build a $200,000 country club
and buy 40 saddle horses for a stable."
Dr. Zon said land deals in northern
Wisconsin remind him of those in
Florida. One land owner wrote him
as follews: "We were somewhat
skeptical on taking. a block of lake
frontage offered 29 months ago for
$1,25. There are cash offers now to
sell this same land, without additional
improvements, to net a profit of
$12,500."
'Property that could be picked up
on tax titles a few years ago for'
around 50 seints an acre," said Dr.
Zon, "is now worth $10 a front foot
and there will be a grab this spring
for tracts on lakes that have any
merit. From being land poor two
years ago, holders of upper Wisconsin
and Michigan property are thinking
in terms of thousands and have a
vision of making northern Wisconsinj
and the territory bordering on Michi-
galn the summer home of the middle
west.
"One of the most significant situa-
tions in the present demand for lake
frontage 'is the clearing up of the
acute delinquent tax problems which
has threatened bankruptcy to manyI
counties. We are not worrying about
this situation now for delinquent land
titles are going like hot cakes and
others are paying up,' reports one
county treasurer.
"The present demand for lake front-
age in the northern portions of Wis-
consin and Michigan is not piece-meal
but is for big tracts and blocks of
land. The reasons for this are de-'
clared to be two-fold: First, the de-
sire of promoters and realtors to ob-+

tain title to the entire lake frontage
for platting into subdivisions; and,
second, the desire of wealthy men or
clubs with money to buy up tracts to
guarantee exclusiveness and shut oui
the public. In the northern Lake
States, the most attractive spots are
those surrounding lakes and streams,
singe there are practically no moun-
tains. The shore property that is cov-
ered with green timber is especially
in demand.
"The northern sections of the lake
states at this rate may become what
the Adirondacks have already become
in New York, a rich man's forest pre-
serve. It is said that 60 to 70 per
cent of all the lake frontage in Wis-
consin and Michigan has been already
bought up by such organizations or is
in the hands of people holding it for
!resort puropses.
"'What does all this mean to forest-
ry? At the present stage its effect
can be but beneficial. These hunting
preserves and clubs will first of all,
demand effective fire protection, and
some of them have retained foresters
for getting the property in good pro-
ductive condition. One even secured
a biological adviser for care of game
on their lands.
"Thelargeinflux of summer people'
into that region will undoubtedly cre-
ate a market for agricultural products
and some agricultural land develop-
ment will take place. These lands,
well protected from fires and assisted
by reforestation, will grow up to for-
ests as the owners for a long time
will probably continue to look upon
them as mere game preserves rather
than a source of timber.
"Side by side with private enter-
prise. there should be awakened pub-
lic enterprises in reforestation. With-
out it a large portion of the lake
states wilderness will become a closed
private hunting and recreation ground,
and the people will be the losers.

SHI RKIN6 OF JURY DUTY '
DETRIENT TO. SOCIETY!
Results In Escape From Justice of
Many Criminals, Says Attorney
As a result of many citizens shirk-
ing jury service, many criminals are
acquitted in the face of overwhelming
evidence of their guilt, asserted Fer-
dinand Pecora, district attorney of ,
New York city in a recent speech. Inp
addition he stated that the only rem- k
edy for this situation was to make
men of ability feel that service on a
jury is a duty that is owed to society,
and must not be avoided.
This direct placing of the reason
for crime on the shoulders of society
serves a special purpose. It awakens
in the mind of the individual a need
for the betterment of existing condi-
tions and in view of this will hasten
in like manner the change that mustl
be forthcoming. Moreover the condi-
tions cannot be prosecuted success-
fully until the public is fully aroused
to the gravity of the situation.
The average man does not grasp the
true significance of his duty. le for-1
gets that he is responsible to society
for the conviction or acquittal of the,
criminal, and he is liable to allow
sentiment and sympathy to overcome

his judgment. Lawyers for the dle-
fense play upon the emotions of the
jury for this reason, and if the men
serving be of inferior mental calibre
and are easily swayed, the decision is
I obviously unfair.
To this end business men of ability
}with the capacity for understanding
the gravity of the situation should be
placed on these juries, and moreover
they should not, in any event, avoid
this fundamental duty to the com-
munity.
Applications For
Summer Training
Camps Are Filed
During the first week of recruiting
for the Citizens Military Training
camp at Camp Custer, 278 young men
miade application according to a re-
port from the Sixth Corps head-
quarters at Chicago.
Any young man between the ages
of 17 and 24 years may make appli-
cation to ,attend the camp for 30 days.
Expenses are fully paid. All necessi-!
ties are supplied. Col. Sheldon ad-
vises anyone who is planning to make
application to do so at once as the
quota is rapidly being filled. Appli-
oations may be madIe to the 85th
Division Headquarters, 204 New Tele-
graph bldg., Detroit.

S f
~~d
yt~ri Ztl~
. .u"" wI

.,,,,

The Lure

of Style

Garments
Few there be to whom a
garment with that indefinable
something we call "style" does
not appeal. We may think
ourselves impervious to its lure,
but whether we are sixteen or
sixty it fascinates us all.
Style, real style, must have
as its partners Art and Quality.
This shop provides you with
such styles-styles you'll not
be ashamed of after the first
wearing-styles that will bring
an admiring comment from
your friends

Junior Girls'Spcial
Corsages, Sweet Peas, Violets
Valley Roses and Orchids
All made in our best styles of fresh flowers that last.
Presentation Bouquets and Baskets at Attractive Prices. I
Flowerday & Son

For here you find Wooltex, Pintzess, Peggy Paris, Robertson and other nationally
known brands that carry the works of art and quality in every line. You will want a new
Spring Coat or a pretty Spring Frocle and he:e you'll always find the best at the price of
the ordinary.
New Sport Coats Dressy Coats
In the new Tuxedo and In Charmeens-in Twills,
Latest Fancy Weaves and in all the new shades.
$25 to $49.50 $29.50 to $65

Paris To Seat
Legion's Next
Annual Rally.
American expeditionary forces will
make their second invasion of France
in 1927, when the American Legion
will hold its annual national conven-
tion in Paris. All veterans of the
World War are being invited to make
the trip at the special rates offered
boy the steamship companies for men
and women enrolled in the Legion for
two years previous to the trip.
The slogan, "Back to France in
1927!" is expected by steamship com-
panies to produce the largest move-
ment of passengers across the Atlan-
tic since the World War.

Gotham Hose
Regular, $1.85
Sheer, $1.95
Making new friends
-keeping old ones

Latest Spring
$14.75 to

Gowns
$65

Spring Suits
Very chic are the
New Tweed Suits,
and only
$25 and $29.,54

Featuring the season's newest fancies in Prints,
in Chiffon, in Georgette and many
Pretty Novelties.

The

Mi~lls Company
18 MAIN STREET
The Shop of Satisfaction

Nickels Arcade

Phone 7014

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TICKETS

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TODAY

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OFFICE,

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AUDITORIUM
ID MONDAY

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22nd

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BOXES $3.00

MAIN FLOOR $2.60

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1111

*i INI

FIRST FOUR ROWS BALCONY $2.00
SECOND FOUR ROWS BALCONY $1.50
REMAINDER OF THEATRE $1.00

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