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March 13, 1926 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SAT(URDAY, MNARC 11 13, -192

PAGE EICIHT

DAI.LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. mn. (11:30 a. in. Saturdays).
Volume VI S 11U~ilAV, _itiAulc 13,l> 3Number 122
1-iversity Lectures:
Dr. Ralph Barton Perry, Professor or Philosophy, Harvard University,
Will deliver a University lecture Dionday, MA'arch 15, at 3 P. M. in the Natu-
ral Science Auditorium on the subject "A Modernist Interpretation of Amner-
ican Ideals." Professor; Perry is also to speakc before the Seminar of the
M1ichigan :School of Religion at 4:15 P. M. Monday, March 15, in Roomn C,
Law Building, on the subject, "What is the good of religion?"
Vnidersity 1Lecture;
Professor Charles Sisson, of the University of London, will delver a
lecture Monday,'March 15, at 4:15,P. M. in Natural Science Atiditoriun on
the subject "Shakespeare in Native Indian." The lecture will be, illustrated.
The public is cordially invited.
lf. E. Robblus.
Merrill-Palmer School Lctiure:
Dr. W. J. Bovie, Professor of Bio-Physics of -lavttrd University, will
deliver a lecture on Tuesday, March 16, at 8 P. M., Natural Science Audi-
torium. The subject of the Lecture is, "The Effect of Ultra-Violet Light on
growthi and Development." President Little will preside. The p)ublic is
cordially invited.
Maiybelle 11. IWhitnecy.
Debate:
Professor Preston V. Slosson and Dorothy Dctzler, national secretary
-of the 'Women's International L egue for Peace andI Freedom, will debate'
the question "Is War Consistent with Christianity?" at 4:30 P. M., Monday,
March 15, in Newberry hall. The public is cordially invited.
Auspices War Resisters' League.
IV. IV. 1Deuton.
Freshmien Engineers:
All those who have not filled out mentor cards must do so at once or
they will not receive any reports. Please call at may office inmmediately and
attend to this matter.
C. 0. Ivisler, Freshmian Mentor.
Economics Club:
Professor H. L~. Cavorly will spreak on "The Taxation of Differential Re-
turns" at the next meeting of the Club, on Tuesday evening, March 1G, at
7:30, in Room 304, Michigan Union.
1. L. Sllarifitan.
Spring Tacation and Sunnuier~lok
Students interested in securing spring vacation and summer work may
interview Mr. Stiles this morning, M\arch 13th, at Room 2, Chubb Building.
(Across from Lane Hall).I
J .. ABlursley.
RoneClub :
The March meeting of the Romance Club will be held at the Haunted
Tavern, 417 East Huron Street, tonight, at 6 :00 P. Al. Professor Cestre will
speak on "The Intellectuals in Contemporary France."
A. .C dnfield. 4
Extra Performance of "Engaged":
There will be an extra performance of "Engaged" on Saturday evening,
March 13, in the Mimes Theatre. One-half of the procee ds, as with the other
performances, will go to the League Building and be credited to the Ann
Arbor. quota.{
Mrs. J. 0. SchlIotterb~eck, Chairman for Ann Arbor.
ENGINEERING COLLEGE CONTINUES1

U. S. Ship Makes Another RCSCUeDRLA PORTE APPOINTED
TO PHYSICSOVPATMENT~
of t It 0 .Di Otto Laporte, 1
W)illsa ilepe0. PhD.from the
., . _"- ::... ;' ;university of Munichz, Germany, as InI-

LOCAL EVENTS
For notices not otherWi e menitioned in
The Daily. Items will be published on
two successive days only. Copy must
be submitted to the Local Events
Ldit,,r Fy i P. M.

()( EN I t U;A 1

REli IGIO S
Sunday
*WIh e'e Shall! we Stand On War?" tutoifrdscsona
f : "0o'c lc:k Lat the Congregational4
fii' :,idie chat.
Y. P. S. Nwill mieet at ? o'clock at
le 1,'reshyt erian cehurch. Topic: "The
'11c o \orshzip in Religion.''
I liiVtguldwill meet at 6:20 o'-
cloc if, 1 the"ild house.
WA~llNC"'O--- Chariles W. HUnt,
of Iowah--!) bennmed for another
'ra asa i emherof the Federal

} tr met or in t he physlcs dlepartment,! Iloluance clumb will meet at 6o-
was announced by Prof.;1. . R.Ian- clock at the Ilaunted tavern. Prafe -
dall, I-ad of the :f~nnt ys r or Cestre wvill speak oan ''The Intel-
Ecay. 3 lectual-i la Contemporary Fru:,ce."
De,. La pert 0 X -15 a. 0u(Iolt of the
I eoet1(iiIphy ii . o.Arnold ('raftsnemmn Will riet it 2 and l :'U

Soll ril.' 'fold. 1For' the"? Pst two ','(?l" :'( 1
D Ir. Laporte has bie a fellow 'o[ tii, --
Intern~al onal Educat on ?board, car ryv-
irng on siool roseopie reseairch at the,
j ureaxu of Standards, in Wanl~inntorl, 4
Already wvell known to 1)?.. lcists
for his investigations on the structurej
)f ccrmplex spectra, Dr. Laporte will
continue these researches in Ann Ar-
bor. In addition he 'N1i1 off(Fr ad-
vancedl courscs in 'atomic stru'cture'
and spectr,<l series analysis.
i E

cock at thy' lason i'IylPO
s. .tsw~m+.f wea

4J
S,' f"
a ,. '.tom

One after another, United States ships are being called on to play rescue
roles in the angry Atlantic. Photo, taken in mid-ocean, shows first of cre~w
of Norwegian ship Pinto, climbing' aboard the United States vessel Caspar
after being taken off their sinking craft.

i

Sr
is holdingfor 'o, ur approval
the latest and snappiest line of
Spring footwear that they've
ever had-A. distitictly fashion-
able stock of the most stylish
and rare patterns in Pumps and
Oxfords ever shown before in
the city of Ann .Arbor!
Come Sec for Yourself
IleoresItIs ToLate!

Scientists
Of

Uncover Forty Relics
Pre-Columbian Age In A rizonaj

Hats cleaned and shoes re-
paired at the same time!
We can rive you service inl
both of these details and
satisfaction hard to equal.
THE
Ann Arbor Shop
625 East Liberty

TUSCO3N, Ariz., March 12.-Buried Jsilver and copper. Sonmc of the swords

deepi in the carthi, near rTuscon, Ariz., are nicked or are broken. The Latin
evidences have been found of a pre- engraving has been (1011 with a sharp
Cohuinbian culture. Leaden crosses, tool anid some havze been cut and the
inscribed in Latin and in Hebrew, edges tooled.
swords of the short double-bladed Ro- On the base of the serpent cross
man type, the Hebrew serpent and are the words: "We were carr'iedl forth
cross, spears, pikes andl other objects, over the sea from Rome to Calains,
of religious or warlike nature have an~ unknown land, in the year of ou,
1 boen uncovered-some forty of them, Lord 775. Theodorus was king,,,of
'in all. Discovery was made near :in thle people." Other inscriptions, that;
old lime kiln lyin~g at tile foot of a have been translated, all relate to
bhuff, overlooking the Santa Cruz val- either religious or, war affairs.
leIy, about seven miles north of Tus- Scientists amnd, historians are at-N
COIL. temlpting to determine the (late ofd-
SThe objects, found over all area of posit and the origin of t Jie people fromI
aIpproxinilotely 100 squalire yards, are I whlom they camle. Se ; (oral theories
alitde (f lead alloy and weigh close are advanced. One is that the~re was
to 00 pouinds together. They have an early hanid of R~omin .Jc<ws settledl
beens cast, shapedl, and lsnmoothed by in these parts--tihis belief' is substanl-j
hammering. Analysis of tile material. tiated by ob~servat ion of Jewish intlu-
sho'A s thait lead and lanltilunly Ihave j ence amng the Azt ces.-m- d To'l cc
benen comibinied with1 traces of tin, gold., tribes.3

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Primarily for the purpose of assist-
ing the department of mechanism and
engineering drawing of the college of
engineering in the efficient administra-
tion of the affairs of the students, spe.
vial pictures of all first-year enzgin-
eering students have been taken for
the last four years, accordling to Prof.
Henry W. Miller, hlead of the mechan-
ism and engineering driawing dlepart-
ment.
This work is a continuation of the
work that was begun by Professor
Miller in 1912 at which timie he was
assistant dean of the college of eng-
ineering at the University of Illinois.
"I' was interested in two problems
at, that time," said Professor Miller,
"that of administerinlg the affairs of
1.500 students of the college, and that
of attempting to determine the prin-
cipa~l characteristics of the students
wvho plowed either conspicuously suc-
cess fu, or, on the other, hand unsuc-
cessful in the pursuit of an engineer-
ing education.
"With reference to the problem of
administration," continued Professor
Miller, "I found that these pictures
were of very great assistance, and
that by the time of the war, it was
the practice of the University of Il-
hlois to take the pictures of all male.
students, who entered."
The secondl problem has been -the
chief line of research by Professor Mil-
ler for tihe last 12 years. "Althaough I
have found thlat tile special type of
pictures that I have been taking (Iur..
ing all .this time show very easily, and
without question, many characteristics
of the students, it would not be0 safe to
say that they indicate anything withE
reference to the possibilities of any

dent. The combination of thie two views
being available for inspection at the
same time, show the facial character-
istics of an individual -more clearly and
readily thlan either view by its-lf.
These pictures are mountedl on cards,
on which are also kept records of th(e
gratdes which the students make dur-
ing their three semesters of engineer-
ing drawing. The instructors who
teach these students also enter onl the
cards, their estimates of various qual-
ities which they have observed. 'Phese
include reasoning power, vision, per-
sistence, nmental cap~acity for technical
work, industry, accuracy, disposition.
and veracity.
"The ,pictures, and the cards onl
Nvhich thle are mounted, along withl the
taking of tihe pictures, has been in tile
charge iof :Prof. Robert C. Cole, in-
structor in drawing, for tile last four
years. It is his duty to see that the
estimlates of all tihe instructor's iin r -
ference to the various qualities andl
chaacteristics, are entered inmmediate-
ly at tihe end of each semester. These
cards thus contain not only all excel-
lent phlotograph of the student, but the
estimates of three successive instruc-
tors of thlose qualities which have had
so munch to do with the success of the
student in the college. and in their
work afterward."

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f FOrUNTAIN PEN
1- SERVICE STATION
SEE US
We repair all standard makes and-
We guarantec every pen we sell, and we also
guarantee to keep it in first class condition..
Ask for Mr. O'Ler
(factory trained)j
C ALKINS -FLETCH ER
DRUG CO.
Three D~elvendable Stores
We have servedl Michigan anmd her Students
for 38 years.

A LOT FOR YOUR MONEY
AWAIT YOU-NEW ADDITIONS DAILY

Q QAATY.
C'
4 . . 1

Clean Up the oId Car
Give it a Surprise and Wash It Frst.

Sponges, 25c, S~c, 75c

$1.25, $1.50

Chamois, 65c, $1.00, $1.25, $2.00, $2.50
All Colors of Paint to Finish the Jlob.

q-QUALITY.
I 44
q.QUALI Y.
v p
R

li
E
I

Hlussey Talks To
Geology Society!
Dr. Russel C. Hussey, instructor f
geology, was the principal speaker: t.
the meeting of Geological Journal
club Thursday. l:-e gave a brief re-
view of several of the latest contribu-
tions to geological literature.
Other reviews were presented by D#
A. Holm, '26,, S. T. Stanton, '26, 1Z. AV.
K~arpinski, '26, and Ronald Smeato
'27. a

young man in the pursuit of an eig-
ineerinlg education."
The pictures referred to, are thoset
that involve both time front and sidle
view on 0o1e prinlt, acconiphshed l I
thIrough the medium of a mir'ror placed
at 45 degre:,es at the side of the stu- y

i
i
a
i

105,'has
pal
Q QUALITY.
Rio

po. C. Fischer ,Hardware Co.

st Washington St.

Phone 4104"

G. '

4

CAN tY

SODAS 1

sa saaenc anvcawara .- nasm w

,.. f .:. a v'. '.gin... i. .. n r.. : .. I f t.. r: 1." hn r. . .r .. /.... '... t::'.' r. r: f e. .. t 1" '::5. 4 1'.1 1{
rA ...., . . .. : ,..., r ., .. -..... r. .... i r .. ., +. ..,, y tM1ri...t&v... ..ir: 1 en r.erl t..r i ;n, .3 , .oki 16-'r r

TONIGHT !

The Sixth and Final Performance of "E GED
(Benlefit of the ie Ws t(I~Building)

TONIGHT!

The D~etroit Newvs- "Gilbert with
consummate skill has burlesqued tile
sweetly sentim~enltal dramas of is

The Miehil-an D~aily - ''Beginning
with Belinida Treherne down to Phillip
Brooks, who playedl a. small par't that
added t o tie splendidly executed mid-

T he Ann Airbor Times.- ewvs- .o
one thing could hlave added any mnore
to the sum total of "Engaged" than
the new cartoonl-settings designed

r'iC 3 ifc higam Daily-- 'Engaged' is
an enltrancing comedy, abounding in
arolusinig situations, umnique in lines,
andf clever in characterizations. The

rI1,c Detroit Free IPre-, "Agn ad-
nmirable effort to maintain the atmlos-
phere of Gilbert's satiric farce was
car'ried out in the revival of 'Engaged'

I

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