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January 24, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-24

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,:. phAOE For

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 132G

Published every morning except Mnday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western. Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusivelynen-
Aill1 d to the use for republication of all news
disjfatches oredited to it or not otherwise
credited inethis paper and the local news pub-
fishied therein.
'Entered at tke posteffce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.se; by snail,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
'bard Street.Eb,
Phaones: Editorial, 492s; business, 21214.

J
Y °.

DlCT08LAL STAFF,
Telephone 4923

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board... NormananR.rhal
City Editor ........... Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor..........Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sports Editor..............,JosepWh Kruger
Telegraph Editor..........William atour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomas V. Koykki
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick U. Shillito
Assistants
t;ertrude 1. Bailey Marion Kubik
William1 T. Barbour Wailter 11. Mack
Charles Behynier Louis R. Markus
W"Nilliamn Breyer Ellis Merry
Helen Morrow
Vhijil) C. Brooks Margaret ,Parker
L. Buckingham Stanford N. Phelps
~tra trof lBuck Simon Rosenbaum
Burger kuth Rosenthal
I. i'rar Carter Wilton A. Simpson
1-tr,.h Chamberlain Janet Sinclair
lcr Cohen Courtland C.kSmith
(' t,_co~ -Chanipe Stanley Steinko
Eu ene i1. Gutekunst Louis Tendler
1 hoiglas Doubleday Henry Thurnau
!l ary lhnanigan David C. Vokes
Andrew Goodman Cassam A. Wilson
Jmcns '. erald Thomas C. Winter
\iies Iimball Marguerite Zilske

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Those persons who have been loud-
est in their accusations regarding the.
Union are now given an opportunityI
to aid in the correction of the faulty
conditions. Those persons who real-
ly have the best interests of the Union
at heart will undoubtedly co-operate
with the new administration toward
securing the desired ends. Those per-
sons whose condemnation of the
Union has been for purely personal,
reasons will probably continue their
campaign to place Michigan's greatest
institution in the hands of its creditqr
banks.
If the campus wants a better Union,
it now has an opportunity to make it
so. The Union has as strong and coni-
petent an administration as 'it has
ever hadl. Things can and will be
lone. Why not help them along? ,v
CARDINAL MERCIER
"The Great Cardinal," "Apostle of
Peace," "Prince of the Church"-
these were the titles which endeared
the man Desire Mercier, famous Bel-
gian Cardinal, to a universe of peo-
ple.
Many will recall the role assumed
by this "Apostle of Peace" during the
World war ,when he abruptly left his
duties in Rome to attend more urgent
ones in his native land, Belgium. His
activities in reviving the spirit of his
countrymen, who were forced to bear
the brunt of the mighty German in-
vasion, evoked admiration throughout
the world. His courageous attitude
in view of the overwhelming odds
which his ill-fated country had to
face for five tragic years drew even
the attention of his enemies, who
recognized in the mild-mannered dis-
ciple a concretion of ceaseless energy
and devotion to a cause.
Upon the signing of the Armistice
the Prelate of Belgium cast off his
mantel of war and once again as-
sumed his secular duties, in which he
engaged himself with the same fer-
vent ardor that characterized his en-
deavors during the war. With his
passing the world recognizes the loss
of one of the immortals of the recent
war who in a Cardinal's garb was yet
a fighter of no inconsequential magni-
tude,-when a just cause was in-
volved.

IVE IVILL
CHEER FOR
THE STUDENTS

Yes sir, boys-you think that the
Senate favors the large stadium plan
don't- you? Well, gang, you're all!
wrong. The Senate actually opposedI
the idea. The report was merely af
"crystallization of the disapproval of;
such a measure as sponsored by many]
of the faculty." Now, that's the real
trmiit-it says 'so in Chimes.
The idea, as we see it, is that theyt
just >passed the measure unaimously1
out of spite. At least they give no
other reason for it in Chimes. Thet
fac lty agreed with every single ob-
jection there was to the plan, every
member is dead against it. There mayt
be a new stadium and the Senate mayt
pass it, but the faculty all heartily,
agree with Chimes-just read it.
DON'T FORGET THOSE
EXAMS-Adv. '
The Rolls committee which has
been investigating the architectural
errors on this campus (come to think
of it, we forgot to mention that the in-
vestigation was being carried on) is'
still hard at it. In the meantime we
have a report from a gentleman who1
has devoted several years to the study
of this subject and modestly assumes
the name of Cal. I Discopic. The re-
port follows:

"THE GORILLA"
A review by Frederic Ziv.
You need not have tired of French'
farces, and Shavian ideals on war, re-
ligion, and politcs in order to welcome
a mystery play in which the criminal,
peculiarly enough, is not finally dis-

musIC
DRAMA

UGLIEST
CAMPUS

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BUILDiNGS . ON THE
IN ORDER OF THEIR
UGLINESS.

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESSMANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

4.,
5'
'V.

Advertising.................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..............T.D. Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising...............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising .................. Wm. L. Mullini
Circulation...............H. L. Newman
Pubiication............Rudolph Bostclau
Accounts............... Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Norquist i
George11. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parxer
WV. Carl Bauer Julius C. Plisko
SHn 1 Lorink Robert Prentiss
V.,7hJ. CoxoWin. C. Pusch
MVgronn A PaiiA Franklin J. Raunies
A. Rolland Damin oseph Ryan
l ames R. DePuy Margaret Smith
Miary IFlinterman Mance Solomon
Margaret L. Funk Thomas Sunderland
Stan Gilbert Eugene Weinberg
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
R. Nelson Sidney Wilson
SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 1926
Niht Editor-ROBERT T. DE VORE
"The situation has changed.
ov that the debate on the-World
Court has been practically finish-
ed, the time has come to vote, and
I, for one, want to vote. I don't
intez( to allow my position to be
construed in any way as being a
party to any plan or agreement
to prolong debate. I think the
coumntry will agree that when the
debate has been finished, when all
has been said that can be said
on both sides that the time is at
hand for the vote. The country
will be impatient over any further
delay."-Senator Butler, Mass. I
POLITICS-OUT
The-re is no part of the University
that is more Michigan than is the
Union; there.is no part of the Uni-
versity that does more to: combine
'nd solidify undergraduate, alumni,
and faculty interests than the Union.
As Michigan stands supreme in the
eyes of her supporters and admirers,
so is her Union a national paragon.
Under the proper conditions, the
sphere that the Union naturally fills!
is incomprehensible. The action of
the board of directors in electing'
William L. Diener as president for the
remainder of the year has done much1
lo create those conditions, and prom-
ises to bring about one of the most
constructive eras in the history of the
institution.
The possibilities of the Union are
unlimited. Due largely to internal
dissention and politics, those possi-
bilities have not only been neglected.
during the past few years, but the
Union has been allowed to slump into
a state of disrepute, at least as far as
th opinions of persons who do notI
lnow all the facts are concerned.
The selection of Diener has broughtI
to the Union an administrator of the
highest order, a man who has been
intimately connected with that insti-I
tution for several years and under-)
stands its workings and problems. No
better qualified man could have been
found to iron out the affairs of the
Union and place them on a firm work-I

RACIAL AMITY
Religious tolerance, that spiritrso
deeply embedded in American prin-
ciples, received a jolt in Manhattan
'recently when 5,000 Buddhist resi-
dents proposed the erection of a
Shrine to Buddha in Central parki.
When the plans were presented to the
commissioner of parks, the proposal
was received with favor. Then an ac-
count of this seemingly unagressive
step was published in the New York
papers.
. A number of demonstrations from
the churches against such a measure
resulted. Ministers of many denoini-
nations rose up, some in arms and
others in derision. All seemed to feel
it highly ridiculous that a paltry 5.000
persons should even consider erecting
a public Shrine to their Sect.
"It is ridiculous," protested one
minister. "I wonder whether the pro-
posal to erect this statue comes from
Will Rogers. It is quite worthy of his
fertile wit," another said. Others ex-
pressed similar opinions.
At a time when the attention of thej
entire civilized world is centered on
the outcome of progressive steps to-r
ward international good will, such a
flood of, narrow, musty protests comes
as a shock. Is international good
will, world union, or a brotherhood of
nations possible when such a feeling
prevails among civilized peoples? Can
inter-racial amity be a reality when
petty jealousies live between peoples
of different creeds?

1. It. 0. T. C. Building (Grand Prix
de Rome, 8000 B. C,)
2. Old Medical Building (Swell ar-
tistic stone base*)
3. Waterinan Gymnasium (Verita-
ble Mountain of design)
4. Zoological Building (True to first
part of name, if not last. Note the
nice crocodile on front facade)
t. Economics Building (Ford rena-
issance inarquise over the entrance)
6~. Barbiour Gymnasiumi (Barberes-
que in feeling--very fetclhing light
woodwork inside)
7. Tappan Hall (Building wanta go
bye ,bye)
S. gneering Shops (To house the
artist-builders-(Irony))
9. k~art'Hall (see map. Containing the
luxurious marble and velvet offices
of' the Engineering faculty)
.10. Old Physics Building (Real
architecture-arches, you know)
11. Alumni Memorial Hall (Ann Ar-
bor's own white elephant)
HALET IN UDDERN DRASS
"So, Mrs. Fietlebaum, where did you
want lest night?"
"Hm, soch a time we hed it Mrs.
Lipschutz. Me and mine- ooy, -we
want it to a prefermence of Hemlet."'
"Yi yi yi yi! a little peeg preferm-
ing waz it yat?"
"Nu, nu. Nut hem, hot Hemlet.
Shnakespirr's Hemlet."
"So what waz?"
"So waz diss. Waz de hirro Hemlet
de Prinz Danmock lung time, ago,
seex saven hondred yirrs ago. So de
proddooser, dot dope, tot he wud save
de custoom. moneh so he made it de
ectors werr it muddern drass. H-m,
sotch a fonny skeptical. De lidding
ector, Bessil Seedney, instad of wer-
ring it byootiful rubbs witt hose witt
dobblet, wurr it guf kneeckers witt
spurt cluz witt loud sucks."
"Yi yi yi yi yi! Well what heppen-
ed ?"
"It simms averybudy was crezy.
Hemlet tinks he sizz it yat his fodder'sI
ghust. De ghust sazz to Hemlet: Mm!
yurr Oncle waz risponsibul fur my
dath. What you going to do abut it?
So Hemlet sazz: Wall, fodder diss
rikwars grey- thut. Lat me suleelok-
wine-.

closed to be the man who has been
leading the. orchestra all evening. But
if you have grown tired of listening to
the croonings of pulchritudnious jazz-
singers portraying, beyond a fair
voice, a perfect symmetry of limb and
torso, you must welcome a play like
the "Gorilla," in which the figure in
the spotlight is not exactly aphro-
disiac proportions.
"Now we gotta start at the begin-
ning," as Mr. Mullingan would say to r
Mr. Garrity. This booming, humorous,.
parody, written "right off 'The Bat,'"
is as spontaneously funny as it is in-
tensely thrilling. A real, "thrilling,
chilling, killing," mystery, with all the
old hokum of a dangling skeleton,
frightened darky, and swooning maid,
to augment the necessary suspense.
The plot is baffling, though extremely
complicated; the humor is well tried
and proved; and the screaming is ter-
rific. But then, who wouldn't scream
if a swinging battle-axe, relic of the
inquisition, missed your necessary
neck by a hair's breath; a treacherous
gorilla brushed you aside in the mys-
terious blackness; and a block-head
detective sent bullets flying around'
the room as prolific as a pin-wheel.
Those of us who were unfortunately
able to dope out the whole plot in
the first act, came away slightly dis-
heartened that we did not save our
good guesses for examination week.
But beyond that, we enjoyed the grip-
ping tensity throughout, and Heavens
be praised, the great master criminal
did not turn out to lie the stern-faced'
weilder of the orchestral baton.
THE ANN ARBOR TRIO
The Ann Arbor Trio under the di-.
rection of Frederick Lewis and in-
cluding Ora Larthard, violincellist.
Stanislawv Szmulewics, violinist, and
Mr. Lewis, pianist, will present its
first local concert Wednesday evening,
February 3,an the Mimes theatre.
The recital will also include Ma-
dame Djina Ostrowska, first harpist
with the Detroit Symphony orchestra,
who has appeared with unusual suc-
cess as soloist with this organization
and in concerts in America and
Europe. One of the most interesting
of her engagements was in Paris
where she was selected by Ravel -to
play his "Introduction et Allegro" at
its first performance.
The complete program will include
the following numbers:
Trio in B Flat Major..Franz Schubert
Allegro Moderato
Andante un poco mosso
Scherzo allegro
Rondo allegro vivace
Variations on a Theme in the an-
cient style . ... ..... Salzedo
Madame Ostrowska
Concerto-D Minor.... Edouard Lalo
Prelude Allegro Maestoso
Intermezzoj
Introduction-Allegro Vivace
Miss Larthard
Colonial Song.......Percy Grainger
THE YPSILANTI PLAYERS
A review, by Karl Zeisler.
One of my favorite nightmares is to
stagger into a station just in time to
see my train dwindling in the dis-
tance. Lord Dunsany's "If" is an
elaboration of that nightmare theme,
and portrays what happened to John
i Beal when he was given a second
chance to catch the 8:15 to town.
1 Dunsany fitted out a ship that re-
quires a versatile crew. John Beal,
the born banker, English to the core,
and endowed with a spark of romance.
acts as a foil to Miralda Clement, an
over-sentimental young English-
woman who in the course of events
becomes an Oriental, and to Hafiz,
the epitome of Oriental intrigue and

passion. Beal falls in love with Mi-
ralda, and cheats Hafiz of his revenge,
and into his clash with each of them
creeps a vein of keen satire.
The Ypsilanti Players are nothing!
if not ingenious. In casting the play
they exhibited an unusual degree of
this talent. C. P. Steimle, in the part
of Beal, exhibited an uncanny sym-j
pathy with the character, and his
work was that degree above profes-
sional which only an amateur who
fits naturally into a part can attain.
Mrs. Newton made a better Miralda in
the English scene than in the Orien-
tal ones, but the part demands a com-

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bookdithnt lstxona ras "Best Sellers" during the last two
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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ONLY
Each Book Wrapped Separately and Sealed
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We call for and deliver.
The MOE L AUNDRY
204 N. MAIN ST. DIAL 391

EDITORIAL COMMENT

17
black
degrees
3
copying

j I_"So dot dope instad he suleelokwize
A NEW "ROMAN EMPIRE.", right away he tinks. Wall maybe I
(The New York World) batter kill it my Onckle and sper de
uddience leestening to my suleelokwy.
It is a tempting idea to toy with, Jost dan he sizz it a muvvment bihind
this scheme of proclaiming an Italian di coitains 'So, Onckle!' Hemlet sazz.
Empire attributed to Mussolini. It 'Leestening witt ivvsdrupping, yes?
would emphasize the Fascist devotion Is diss a system?' So he pools it a!
to the stern virtues of ancient Rome.I gon and beng! shoots it de coitan.
It would advertise to Europe the fact Bot he finds re haz shot it Pilunius,I
that Italy feels a new importance hiz switthot's fodder. 11m, waz he
since the war. It would waken in onheppy! Dan he stotted in suleelok-
Italian breasts aspirations for fresh wizing. 'To be odder nut to be, that iz
power and glory. It would harmonize de quastion. Whadder it it batter to
with the transformation of Italy from bomp my Onckle uff witt a knife odder
a Parliamentary democracy to a dic- witt a gon, odder seemply drup it in
tatorship. And what would it cost? his wine some bichlurrite moicury? Is
Simply the adoption of a new name. batter the letter course bicuzz therrs
But if Mussolini looks into the mat- a diveenity that ships our ends, roff
ter a little deeper some other items hue tham whare we will.'
of cost may occur to him. There is Minnwhile waz gredually Hemnlet
no use speaking about an empire if and Uffilia his switthot going crezy
you think only of a peninsula the size with insane. So Uffilia dies, and Hem-
of Arizona. One of the psychological let dissides that he batter gat beezy,
effects of the name would be to make So lie goes to de cunner drog store$
Italians talk of the Adriatic as an Ital- [and sazz 'Geev me, pliz, twanty grains?
ian lake and the Mediterranean as ani bichlurdite moicury, and chogge it to

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longest wear.
Plain ends, per doz. $1.00
Rubber ends, per doz. 1.20
e/Itall dealers
American LeadPencil Co.
220 Fifth Ave., N.Y.

"s"
A
E
R
'S
A
F

G RAN CE R
Wednesday,
Friday
Saturday
$1 Per Couple
Any of these three nights
you will find a dance at Gran-
ger's. We try to please as
many as we can and have
found that these three nights
satisfy the majority.
he mid-week dance on
Wednesday is from 8-10 and
is in every detail exactly the
same as the week-end dances
except that it is shortened so as
not to interfere with your
studies. F
Friday, Feb. 5. For the

R

A
N
E
E

Buy
o an
dozen

' \ .. IAA®A owl

INGOPtP.ASD c'-.-.a it i.2K. FA5T. IfPF.
SIR. R. F. McI3I {)?; I
Mollday and Tesdiay

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