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January 28, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-28

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PAGE FOUJR

TIAF MICHIGlAN DAIL Y

.. .,.; .. _, _ ,... i I IIL IIlIV~I I1V['7I \ Lr-) LA 1

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1926.

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conterence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled;to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished: therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
? _chian, as, second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.a
Offices-Ann Atbor Press Building, May-
nard, Street.,
Rhones: Editorial,, 42; business, 214.
$I)IThIALSTAFF,
Telephone 4025
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board.... Norman R. Thal
City Editor...........gRobrt S. Mansfield
News Editor...........;Manning Houseworth
.oen s Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
SotsEditor........... ..Josep~h Kruger
7 . graph Editor.... . William Waithour
Muc and Drama........Robert D. Henderson
Night Editors
S1,ith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
RJbert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Asistaut City Editors
Irwin Olian t Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Chaerls Behymer
iliiam Bryer
]'l!1;. Brooks
Farmi Buckingham
St. ton lBuck
Cu Burger
Edg ar Cartcr
ph t.hamberlain
Mayer Cohen.
.-letom Chaimpe.
g Doubleday
c . Gutekunst
A~rwGoodman
lameT hldKbi
M:rion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
jimon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair"
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
D~avid C. Vokes
t farion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
4'homas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

officitls would greatly increase the
standard of American politicians and
would, in the long run, be cheaper.
CUT IT OUT !
There is something wrong with the
existing method of censoring motion
pictures. At least, that is the word of
Judge Ben Lindsey, who has gained
an international reputation through
his work in the Denver juvenile court.
Further, pointing with pride to his
own statecof Colorado, where there is
no state censorship, the jurist main-
tains that conditions there, as far as
the screened drama is concerned, are
better than those existing in places
where both state and locil censorship
are in vogue.
Judge Lindsey's attack is not di-
rected toward the abolition of all
censorship,-for it is well known and
freely admitted that motion pictures
have a tremendous effect upon youth,
andsome censorship is desirable.
There is a well known picture in
which a young urchin of the streets
leads a glamorous life by breaking,
windows, while his foster parent, a
celebrated comedian, then makes a
living by repairing them. Reports of
police departments the nation over
show that almost invariably, after the
showing of this film, there is an
alarming increase in the number of
windows broken in the neighborhood
served by the picture house where
the film was presented.
Such records indicate in part how
strong the subtle influence of motion
pictures is upon the youthful mind.
Clearly it is proper that there should
be some censorship of films before
they are presented to the general
public. Judge Lindsey'stattack is
centered, and justly so, upon the way
in which this work of censorship is
carried out, and upon the evils which
attend it.
Censorship, the judge says, makes
for "intolerance, bigotry, fanaticism,
and tyranny." To these many evils,
are often added others, growing out of
"petty politics." All too often, those
who censor pictures are, as a recent
writer suggests., persons who accept
their positions that they may enjoy
scenes which it is their pleasure to
deny to others. That is a cynical at-
titude, but partially to be excusef
when the operation of the present
system of censorship is considered.
In the last analysis, the Answer to
the problem is one which the judge
himself suggests,-that of so teaching
children that they will be "their own
best censors." But that, like many
other worthy projects, must await the
millenium. A beginning can, how-
ever, be made. To extend it further
requires the. prevalence of a higher
standard of intelligence,--that stand-
ard toward which all nations struggle
more or less successfully.
CREDIT-USE AND ABUSE
The past decade and especially the
past few years have witnessed a tre-
mendous increase in the amount of
business done yearly on a time-pay-
ment or credit basis. The installment
plan has been extended to the pur-
chase of practically every known
product. Jewelry, clothing, furs, au-
tomobiles, books, real estate,-almost
anything can be bought on easy or
uneasy terms.
The advantages of the system are
multifold. People of moderate means
are enabled to make purchases such
as homes, stocks, and bonds out of
1 accruing income. The benefits are

/
tiRX

MUSIC
DRAMA

6

HUMOR STRIKE SETTLED
BY1VITORY FOR WITS
NATIONAL STRIKE ENDS AFTER
FOURTY*-EIGHT HOUR
CONFERENCE
HUMORISTS GAIN ALL DEMANDS

Local
tionl

Department Suspends . Publica-
Pending Agreement. New
Contract Is Permanent

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising. .........Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising .................. Wmn. L. Mullin
Advertising .........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
C;1-ilation...............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts...................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
CGorge H. Annable, Jr. F. A. Norquist
W. Carl Bauer Loleta G. Parker
John H3. Bobrink D avid Perrot
N. J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
A.ary Flinterman Joseph D. Ryan
James R. DePuy Stewart Sinclair
Stan Gilbert Mance Solomon
T. Kenneth Haven Thomas Sunderland
1aroi Holmes Wm. J. Weinman
e Margaret Smith
Frank Mosher Sidney Wilson
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1926
Night Editor-SMITH H. CADY, JR.

(Special to Rolls)
Washington, D. C., Feb. 27.-Final
settlement of the three-day national
humor strike, effecting practically all
publications throughout the United
States and Canada, was settled to-
night after the delegates from the two
parties, the publishers and the hu-
imorists, were in conference for more
than"-forty eight hours. The settle-
ment is generally acknowledged to be
a complete victory for the humorists.
Their demands which were:
1. Abolition of the "Mamma-Lit-
tle Willie" jokes.
2. No further use of Prohibition
and allied jokes.
3. Absolute discontinuance of the
"Abie's Irish Rose" theme and,.
related jokes.
4. Iar er variety of type and
cuts in humorous publications.
p. Recognition of this type of
writing as a distinct and sepa-
rate profession.
were all granted, although this fol-
lowed many hours of debate.
Thb publishers were willing, from
the outset, to grant the last two de-
mands, but were firm in their stand
against the first three. Their claim
was that as there was nothing new
under the sun, the only policy was
to use the best of the old stuff which
was always bound to be sure fire. The
humorists, on the other hand, claim-
ed that the publishers knew little or
nothing about humor being, for the
most part, absolutely devoid of the
slightest traces of the so-called sense
of humor, and were therefore not fit
to dictate in any way the writing of
the humorists whom they employed.
The publishing forces countered this
with the argument that since they
employed them they had a perfect
right to dictate the type of material
which the humorists used.
The humorists, however, were ada-
mant and issued an ultimatum to tne
effect that if the publishers were un-
willing to agree to their demands
they would seek other means of em-
ployment. After several hours of con-
ferences, the publishers acknowledge
the value of the humorists' work by
conceeding to their demands. This
was only after several attempts at a
compromise had failed.
The strike was called after a col-
umnist on a New York daily refused
to print a prohibition joke which had
struck the owner of the paper as very
funny. The owner threatened to dis-
charge the columnist who then got in
touch with the local Union. The Union
threaened a strike unless the owner
of the paper withdrew his demands.
IH refused to do so .and the Union at

,;;
;

THIS AFTERNOON: The University
Symphony orchestra, Maud Okkel-
berg, soloist, in Hlll auditorium at
4:15 o'clock.
TOMORROW NIGHT: "The Student
Prince" in the Whitney theatre at
'S:15 o"clock.
"WILY MARRY"
Twelve years ago, back in 1914-be-
fore the War, before expressionism,
a whole generation before Broadway
became the greatest theatrical center
in the world-Jesse Lynch Williams
w,as accorded the signal honor of
being awarded the first annual Pulit-
zer prize for the most distinctive
native play of the year. It 'was a
startling, daring comedy for those
chaste years; a brilliant satire of life
,and love, the "new" and the "old"
woman, of marriage and the American
credo.
Masques are now preparing this
conceited high comedy, "Why Mar-
ry?", for production in the Mimes
theatre during the week of March 17,
and Mr. Williams is having the cer-
tain satisfaction of testing the hardi-
hood of the play that first brought
him into national prominence. As
Mimes passed through the stress of
reviving in "Beggarman" a farce
three centuries old, so Masques are
facing the equally exciting problom
or re-stating this delicious apology
for marriage and divorce.
It is highly fitting that a campus
organization should present one of
Mr. Williams' plays while he is the
holder at the University of thie Fellow-
ship in Creative Arts, and it is a
very literal honor and opportunity of-
fered Masques. The entire produc-
tion is under the direction of Phyllis
Loughton, who also staged Shaw's
"Great Catherine," and the cast in-
cludes John Hassberger, former presi-
dent of Comedy Club and prominent
in such former productions as "Out-
ward Bound," "Captain Applejack"
and "unty Pulls the Strings;" Lil-
lian Bronson, who did such remark-
able work in "The Cradle Song" and
"Outward Bound;" and Margaret
Effinger. The only substitution in the
characters as originally announced
has been in the part of Uncle Everett,
where Vialentine Davies is replacing
Robert Henderson.
* * *
WHY A REVIVAIL?
Following two capacity houses
early in the fall, the Mimes are re-
peating their production of W. S. Gil-
bert's burlesque, "Engaged," Wednes-
day, Thursday and Friday, March 10,
11 and 12, in the Mimes theatre. At
the time, the run of the play was cut
short due to the stress of the Opera
rehearsals, although the box-office
demand for seats had hardly begun to
be satisfied. Also due to the general
confusion of the Opera, the produc-
tion side of "Engaged"--the costumes
and the settings-were scarcely ade-
quate.
In its revival, therefore, the cgst is
being somewhat changed with certain
parts more carefully selected, entirely
new cartoon settings are being de-
signed by Frederick Hill, art editor
of The Gargoyle, and costumes of the
period have been ordered from Van
Horn and Company of Philadelphia.
In addition half of the proceeds of
the production are being donated, as
the contribution of the Mimes and the
Michigan Union, to the Women's
League building.
Finally in the revival of "Engaged,"
there is the point of Belinda Tre-
herne. Scarcely a criticism or re-
view since her debut, through the
Black Queen, Patiomkin, Jeppe, and
the rest, has been written that did

not allude to this Lady of the Sor-
rows. Since, like the cat, she refuses
to be dead, ~she is now being re-cre-
ated to satisfy and refute her per-
sistent publicity.
.* S*
IBARRE HILL
Barre Hill, baritone and a pupil of
Theodore Harrison, assisted by Donna
Esselstyn, piano, and Dwight Sterre,
accompanist, will present the follow-
ing program on the Students' Recital
Wednesday evening in the University
School of Music auditorium at eight
o'clock:
Remembrance......Frank A. Tabor
(Dedicated to Barre Hill)
Tears of God .. ...........Mowrey
The, Bitterness of Love ........Dunn
The Last Song ..............Rogers,
Mr. Hill
First and Second Movements of
Sonata, Op. 23.......Scriabine
Dramatico
Allegretto
Miss Esselstyn
Dichterliebe..............Schumann
Barre Hill
Poems by H. Heine
Translations by Alice Mattullath

FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
MtES IL

Large size
Regular $5 one

Udol

Graham Book Stores
At Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk
SKILLED REPAIRING U
AUI MakesU

I

I

Insure

QUICK SERVICE

MA WE T W ;1E

)1
1
i
+

"A Wiser and Better Place
to Buy."
New Spring Hats Are Ready.
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
(Where D. U. I. Stops at State St.)

THE PEOPLE PAY
At regular intervals, new charg-1
es of inefficiency in the govern-1
ment crop out, decrying the abund-
ance of graft, the excessive ,amount
og political "pull," the lack ,of honest
and capable public officials, and the
feneral decadence of the American
government. Some of the charges
are, no doubt, groundless, born of the
distrust of the politician that is be-
coming inherent in Americans, but
mray are only too true. And the en-
V re business, whether true or false,
helps to discredit the political em-
ployee in the eyes of the country.
The way to get a better government
is to get better men in it. And it
secmns evident that in America it is
x -:-ry difficult to get men to serve for
' the honor and glory of their country
except in times of stress, such as the
World war period. The American is
money-maker, and he- finds it hard
6 sacrifice his business interests to
talke public offices at -much smaller
incomes.The, successful lawyer finds1
it financially unprofitable 'to seek
clection to a public office, which
leaves the way clear for the unsuc-
cessful "shyster"-and what the profit
of a democracy, what the privilege of
choosing between candidates, if none]
of the candidates are men of the
right calibre?
In England, politics is a profession,
followed by certain families for gen-
erations. A government position,
while not especially well paid, is
sought for other reasons,-social
prestige, and the honor of serving
Britain. Therein lies the reason for
the' reported 'higher standard of the
British diplomatic service and the
British government on the whole.
There is one lure which will bring
out the same type of men in the
United States-money.
The public pays in the long Tun, at
any rate. Graft and inefficiency cost
more today than would real salaries
for the right kind of men. Judges, of
alli public officials, are; most notorious-
y nunderpaid-but senators, congress
men, mayors, governors, city council-
men-all are paid such small amounts
that trained men avoid, the positions
and those who do obtain them add to
their income by means that are, at
times, scarcely within the law.

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS
Paths on snow form ice and kill
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use such paths.
TOASTED
BACON
Sandwiches
TICE'S
709 North university

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lI~ld1d../I.,./.e/... . ,0.! *o. /,,dQOr.- 0 01O .

ccUt

Oran ct~s
to come to GRANGER'S any Wed-
nesday, Friday, or Saturday if you tare
to enjoy a few hours of dancing. Our
patrons are mostly students and you will
very likely meet many of your friends
during the evening,
For your convenience, we maintain a
checking service for both men and wom-
en, -rest rooms, and have a complete soda
fountain service on a balcony overlook-
ing the dance floor. It is very pleasant
to be able to watch the others dance
while you are enjoying your soda or
sundae. 4a
Remember,
Wednesday,. Friday, or Saturday.
~ranref$

Your Work with

1Arthe pen that
really works
all the time
The only Fountain Pen which holds enough ink for Student use.
It's a Self-Starter and Steady Writer. Will last a Life-time. No other pen
like or equal to it. Made, Sold and Serviced right here in Ann Arbor.
A Student Needs A Good Pen
Rider's Pen Shop has the only real Fountain Pen Service
in Ann Arbor or in the state.
A casual visit to a Medical College or school of Surgery does not
qualify for diagnosis or surgical operation,
Your pen is a delicate instrument. Do not trust it to a pretend-
er. "A little learning is a dangerous thing." We have earned the right
to hang out our shingle "Expert Repairing"
Pens and Ink Exclusively 315 State St.

i
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f

quite apparent. However, a tendency once announced a national strike
is noticed for an individual to buy! which went into effect immediately,
things in this manner which he can- d causing practically all the newspa-
I not well afford, on the hazy hope of pers in the country to appear without
future income or the easiness of re- their humor columns, one of the main
ferred payments. There lies a danger selling points, for three days. By
in the abuse of this system. The time special request, no names of any men
may come when one who has over- connected, with the strike or settle-
burdened himself with obligations ment are being published.
cannot meet them. He will then re-,
alize that credit is an invaluable ser- I LOCAL HUMORISTS
vant-but can become a dangerous PLEASED
master.
Various Pu lieations Suspend Work
During Strike. Ed~tors
Commen1 IIt
EDITORIAL COMMENTC
Local humorists joined the nation-'
wid , strike, and for a period of three
THEY JUDGE THE QUICK, -N OT
THE TlDEAd ys 'no work was done on the forth-I
coming issue of Gargoyle and The
(New York Times) I Daily ran no TOASTED ROLLS col-
A good idea has been evolved in I umns during that time, except one
the Thomas Jefferson High School, which had gone to press just as the
over in Brooklyn. They are to have I strike started but was not released
there, not a Hall of Faine, devoted to until the final settlement.
the memory of departed eminence, Conimenting on tme outonme of tie
but a Iall of Living Leaders-mn strike at a late hour last night,
and women now alive, who are to be Walker Everett, managing editor of
selected by the students as now doing Gargoyle, said: "I have always had
things worthy of recogmition and ad- every confidence in the victory of wit
miration. over brain. I seen in this the final
There is, to be sure, the danger that breaking. ;up between the humorists
some of the names thus chosen will and the intellectuals."
have to be removed before the careers "From now on," he continued, "we
of their possessors are closed, for will go our way, and they, God For-
reputations are unmade as well as! bid, theirs. I have always maintained
made, and later manifestations of that a quip in, the court is worth two
character and ability are likely to on the gallows."
overshadow or obscure the earlier * * *
ones if there is a marked difference "We am overjoyed at the result, al-

I

=~ocoo@o

corl-PM.KO

The fact that so many eat
here day after day and week
after week is evidence of
the unceasing excellence of
the meals that we serve

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