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January 26, 1926 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-26

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1926

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturdays).
Volume VI FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1926 number 109
The Investigation Committee, appointed by the Board of Directors of
the Michigan Union will meet in Room 302 of the Union at 2:00 P M, to-
day. Anyone interested in appearing before this body will be cordially
received.
Henry C. Anderson, Chairman,
Mouse Dances:
The following organizations have been given permission to hold parties
en Friday, February.26, 1926
Alpha Xi Delta
Kappa Alpha Theta
Phi Gamma Delta (Closed)
Phi Rho Sigma (Closed)
J. A. Bursley.
House Dances:
The following organizations have been given permission to hold parties
on Saturday, February 27. 1926:
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Xi Psi Phi
J. A. Bursley.
Journalism Students; Radio Address:
The address on world newspaper conditions by Karl A. Bickel, presi-
dent of the United Press, announced in Prof. Brumm's and Mr. Jones'
classes, may be heard Friday at 9 P. M. on radio from Station KFKX,
Hastings, Neb.
Through the courtesy of Mr. Stoff let, the Stofflet Phono Shop, 616 E.
Liberty St., will be open for students and others who may wish to hear the
address through radio apparatusthere.
J. W. Holmes.
History I*
Make up examination-1011 Angell Hall, Saturday, February 27.
A. E. 1. BoAk.
Electrical Engineering Students:
On Friday, February 26th, at 4:15 P. M., an interesting film of the
Rochester (N. Y.) Gas & Electric Corporation will be shown in the Natural
Science Auditorium. The film shows the manufacture, sale and distribution
of gas, steam, and electrical energy and the application of theory to prac-
tice. All electrical engineering students are invited to attend.
Maurice H. Nelson, Chairman, A. I. E. E.
The resolution to be introduced in the session of Tuesday, March 2, of
Adelphi House of Representatives will be, "Resolved that co-educational
institutions are a failure."
Robert S. Miller, Speaker.
To All Baud Musicians:
All musicians that are planning on trying out for the U. of M. Varsity
band are asked to meet with Mr. Clyde R. Flory, director of the Varsity
Reserve Band, Tuesday; March 2, 1926, at 7:15 P. M. in Morris Hall. Bring
your instrument and stand.,
Gordon Packer.
Faculty Coleert:
The University Symphony Orchestra, Samuel P. Lockwood, conductor,
Maud Okkelberg, pianist, will give the following program in Hill auditorium,
Sunday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock:
Overture to the Ballet "Prometheus" Op. 43 (Beethoven); "The Leaves
be Greene" (Byrd); Concerto, E minor (Chopin); Symphony A major (Men-
delssohn).
Charles A. Sink.
Choral Union Ushers:'
All ushers and extras are requested to be at their assigiments in Hill
Auditorium tonight at 7:30 P. M.
W. A. Davenport,
Ass't. Supt. Buildings and Grounds Dept.
Economics Club:
The Club will meet in Room 104, Economics Building, March 1 at 7:30
P. M. Professor C. N. Schmalz will speak on "Some Current Developmen:s
in Department Store Operation."
. L. Sharfman.
Military Ball Committee Meeting:
Military Ball Committee Meeting will be held in Room 302, Union, Fri-
day, Mameh 26, at 4:30 P. M.
George C. Wetzel, General Chairman.
Phi Delta Kappa:
Luncheon at the Lantern Shop today, 12:00. A full attendance is de-
sired.
I. A. Hloney, President.

J-11oP Committee:
There will'be a meeting of the committee at the Union, Room 302, Tues-3
day evening, March 2.
John Henry Lovett.
Psychologist Devises Instrument
To Measure Changes Of Emotions

Mexican Exiles Fear Round-Up AMERICAN CAPITAL SHOULD INVEST IN RUBBER
PLANTATIONS OF FAR EAST, SCIENTISTS STATE

"If the United Sta'tes wishcs to I cost of production at the time pro interested to wish to guarantee its
gain a share in the control of the hibited reasonable profits. In case the supply in case of emergency," Profes-
world's rubber supply, American cap-jmeasure had not been enacted, he said, sor LaRue asserted, "it can be done,
ftal should invest in plantations in the abandonment of the estates would either by investing in the Dutch Easty>
the Dutch and British East Indies," have caused the price of rubber to in- Indies or by raising rubber, without
according to Prof. A. J. Barnouw, of crease greatly in a few years. The much prospect of profit, in the Phil-
Columbia university, who wSs Il Ann price at present, he continued, is not inpines." H. S. Firestone has a 'ro-

w{rte;
r.;:. ;:
F
ff
y< '.

Arbor recently for the Dutch Present-j
ation convocation. Professor Bar-
nouw, who has just returned from the
Far East, says that the Philippines,
offer no solution to the problem, be- ,
cause the natives there would not be
willing to work in the plantations,
and it would be necessary to import
labor.
The same opinion 'was expressed by.
Prof. Carl D. La Rue, of the botany de-'
partment, who for three years was in
Sumatra as an investigator for the
United States Rubber- company, and
was head of a United States govern-
ment expedition to study the growing!
of rubber in the Amazon valley in 1923.
He outlined four disadvantages of
the Philippines, saying, that in addi-
tion to the labor difficulty, only part
of the islands have the proper clim-
ate. The land laws, limiting holdings
by one individual or com-
pany to 1200 acres, would hinder the
development of plantations, and the
questionable political status of the is-
lands makes capitalists wary of in-
vestment, there, he believes.
"American captial," Professor LaI
Rue continued, "has not been inter-I
ested in rubber for some years. This
is partly due to a campaign of in
vestment in Mexican rubber ventures,
most of which proved false, and the
remainder of which failed because
they used the wrong tree. That gave
the United States a bad taste about
rubber. This is shown by the fact
that the United States Rubber com-
pany, when it started investing inI
Sumatra, did not sell stock especially
for the rubber venture, but used its
own finances, making the plantations
branches of the main company."
Professor La Rue opposes Secre-
tary Hoover's opinion that Great Brit-
ain is deliberately trying to enrich it-
self at the expense of the United
States by controlling the price of rub-
ber, and explained that England's po-
sition is economically a logical one.
The Stevenson act, limiting the pro-
duction of rubber and thus raising the
price, was passed only to save the es-
tates from being abandoned, for the

rising
quite a
sumers

as the alarmists state.
fair price and the British
are not favored. In fact,

It is ject to raise it on a large scale In
con- Liberia, he said.
they ,Professor Barnouw stated that there

opposed the Stevenson act, as it rais-
ed 'the price for them as well as for
foreign purchasers. lie does not ex-1
pect the British to raise the pricef
beyond the level economic conditions
will naturally settle, as such action
would tempt investors into other fields,
increase production, and lower the
price again, with the British share of
control decreased.
British possessions, Professor La
Rue stated, produce about 70 per cent
of the world's supply, and in 1923, the
United States consumed more than 701
per cent of it.I
Methods of raising rubber such that
machines could be used to cultivate
the plants and treat the product, have
been suggested, he continued but until

'

is considerable British capital in the
Dutch East Indies. The British, lie,.
said, foresaw the demand, and started
planting rubber before its was pro-
fitable, with the result that they are
now by far the largest producers.
The centers of rubber growing, in
the Dutch possessions are 'Java, w.hich_
has 35 million inhabitants in an area:";
equal to that of Michigan, and Sum-n
atra; a long narrow island mearly':
touching the Malay peninsula. Sing<
apore, two miles across the straits..
from Sumatra, is the chief export
city for both the British and Dutch,
possessions. The natives in Sumatra,-.
Professor Barnouw asserted, are get-
ting so rich through their own rub-':
ber growing that they won't do do--

t r.: .. ..., .. L . .......,. ...J . . ........ . , .. ..r .. , .p........,. .. ,. wr. .a sa . wav acsw w y+ xw

they are perfected raising rlubber in mestic labor. The product raised by
the United States is out of the ques- the natives is not suitable for export
tion, on account of the labor condi- due to lack of scientific methods and
tions in this country. Tapping, of the because it is not kept clean, but they
trees must be done by hand. Labor sell it to Chinese manufacturers inw
prices in the Far East vary from 16 Singapore who work it over and ship,
to 25 cents a day, and in Brazil from it.
50 to 70 cents. n ts
"if the United States is suticiently PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION ?NOW0

24

SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Feb. 25. -- and who of late has been selling pat-
While the United States government is ent medicines for a living, and R.
being accused by one element below 11Esparaza Martinez, a former secre-
the. Rio Grande of plotting the down- I tary of the Mexican Chamber of De-
fall of the Calles government because puties, preceded the others.
of Mexico's new oil laws, United The refugees are preparing to fightl
States officials are rounding up the ldeportation, declaring that they arel
last of a group of prominent political being persecuted for past political of-
refugees alleged to be concerned in fenses.
a plot to overthrow Calles. The United States, where they came
Seven are under arrest, including to live peaceably, free from tyran-
Alfonso De I a Huerta, brother of ny, is, they assert, aiding illegally in
Adolfo De La Huerta, who led the last the persecution.
revolution in Mexico. and Gen. Fran-
cisco Coss, who hasbeenlivin in Unidgntined Man
hourly fear of assassination. Others uentifiedsiMan
being held are: Gen. Salvador Urias, Killed By Train
taken in El Paso; Jorge Prieto Laur-
sen, former governor of the state of -
San Luis Potosi, apprehended in Kan- Killed by a Michigan Central train,
sas City; Gen. Lorenzo Nieto, now an the body of an unidentified man was
insurance man,' arrested in San An- found along the tracks yesterday
tonio; Leo Carcia, former minister to morning. The only item found in the
Cuba, arrested at a hospital in El I Manm's., clothing was a. safety razor.
Paso. His age was estimated at 30 years.
The arrest of Gen. Francisco Coss,
picturesque revolutionist who enter Want a room? Read Page Seven
ed Mexico City with Carranza in 1915 and use the Classified columns.-Adv.!

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Using an apparatus that has never
before been duplicated in the United
States, Martin M. White, of Temple,
Tex., instructor in psychology at the
University of Texas, is conducting an
experiment to measure intensity of
feeling by changes of blood pressurej
in, the arm. Advanced students in
psychology are acting as subjects for
the experiment, the complexity of the
apparatus effecting the validity of the
result 'were inexperienced subjects'
used.
The apparatus consists of a plethy-

smograph, an instrument for record-
ing changes of blood in the arm; a
machine which records the rate and
change of breathing; a blood pres- I
sure apparatus, and a lip key which
measures the time it takes for the
subject to react to a word given him
by the experimentor.
PARIS. - The League of NationsI
itself is the "sole and best judge" of
the question of enlarging the league
council, Premier Briand said yester-
day.

Member Federal Reserve System

..,..

ifoC

r,.rr

THE,

MIMES

REGRETFULLY

ANNOUNCE THE FINAL

PERFORMANCE

OF

"BEGGARMAN'

The Detroit Free Press. - "The
Mimes added another distinguished.
success to its long list tonight when
it presented Holberg's 'Beggarman.'
The production increases the name
that the Mimes are making for them-
selves as creators of the unusual."

The Michigaau 'i aiiy.-' 'Beggarman'
is rollicking good fun to watch; it is
good drama; and it is almost fault-
. less theatre. The gentry were done
with a grace and sureness profoundly
furprising in thle annals of amateur
productions, and the staging was ex-

The Detroit Tines.-"Amy Loomis
starred in the production of the
Danish drama, 'Beggarman,' staged
by the Mimes for the first time in
this country. As Nille she set a.
lofty standard for her fellow actors
to equal."

The Ann Arbor Times News, -
'Beggarman' gives occasion for
some of the best dramatic work seen
this year on the campus. The char-

The Detroit News.-"Amy Loomis
as Nille, the peasant's wife, was en-
thusiastically applauded by the audi-
ence of students and faculty members

{

:

acter of Jeppe
the changing a:
peasant. His

is portrayed with all who packed the theatre for the open-
spects of the child-man ing performance of Holberg's uproar-
last pitiful farewell of ions burlesque, "Beggarman.
c - - - - - -, n r of th . . a

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