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January 23, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-23

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ESTABLISHED
1890

4i- 4

obpl&
At\
:43 wow tl. AMLAR

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

3

i

VO4. XXXVI. No. 106

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

OPKINS UNIVERS1TY~
ANOUNCESRHETURN'
J'WTIETH ANNIVERSARY MARK
CELEBRATED1 BY MEDIICAL
COLLEGE
REALIZE FIRST AIM
New Plan Calls For Suppression Of
First Two Undergraduate Years 7
To Research Worka
(Dy Associated Press)
BALTIMORE, Feb. 22. - Johns
Hopkins university today celebrated
its half-century anniversary with an
announcement of an impending return'
to its first principles of graduate in-
struction and research. The alma
mater of Rowland, -the physicist;-
RAemsen, the chemist; Osler, the phy-
sician; Sylvester, the mathematician;
MOrris, the classicist; Martin, the
biologist; and Gildersleeve, the Gre-
cian, will abolish the purely under-
graduate first two years of its present
curriculum and devote itself to re-t
search and preparation for research.o
When the vision of Pres. Frank J.
Goodnow and its board of trusteest
has been realized, Johns Hopkins will t
grant doc'tor of philosophy and mas-3
ter degrees only outside of its medi-
cal and engineering schools. No date
has been set for the change. It is!
estimated that an additional endow-a
ment of at least $6,000,000 will be re-s
quired to put the plan into full effect a
and to make available higher salaries
"to enable the university to add to
the faculty men of outstanding abil-
ity.,,
Fifty years ago, when the univer-
sity's first president, Daniel Coit Gil-
man, was inaugurated, the trustees
.determined to devote the resources oft
Johns Hopkins to graduate education i
and research-at that time regarded °
as a new and important venture ina
American education. "The results
have exceeded the most optimistic
hopes of fifty years ago," today's
statement says, "a recent compilation
of the leading men of science in thes
United States showing that 245 of.
them were trained at Johns Hop-
kins"
Research having enlarged the
boundaries of knowledge, including
in collegiate as well as graduate
much that was unknown 50 years ago,c
the statement continues, "curricula
have been expanded and Johns Hop- I
kins among other universities has ex-J
tended its activities to include fields
not associated with research and f
preparation for it with the followingt
results:
"Graduate schools which shouldI
emphasize freedom of teaching, per-I
sonal contact between teacher and
student and stimulation of indepen-c
dent thought have been invaded by
methods more appropriate to col-
legiate instruction.<
"The student preparing for re-
search work is required to spend too
many years in general study before
he begins to concentrate upon pro-
ductive work.
"The increased number of students
has required a more elaborate system
of administrative organization, with
the result that the professors and in-
structors find too little time available
for their proper fdntion, research
and stimulation of research."
LONDON.- The Royal Aero club's
Brittania trophy for the most meritor-4
lous performance by a British airman4
during 1925, has been awarded to Alan
Cobham for his 17,000 mile flight from
London to Rangoon and back.

OurWeaatherMan-
.-predicts that it will be generally
fair today wilth slowly rising ten-
perature.
'immie
Returns
to

LAW STUDENT COMMITTEE FIXES
DA TE OF ANNUAL CREASE DANCE
With the date for the Crease dance, preference will be given according to
the annual all-law party, fixed for classes.

March 26, the committee in charge has
begun active preparation for the chief
social event of the law students.
The dance will be held in the Law-
yers' club, and, following last year's
precedent, the party will be formal.
Because of the increased popularity
of the event, and the fact that only
125 couples canbetaccommodatednat
the Lawyers' club, the committee will
give out applications for tickets.
These application blanks will be
available some time this week, and

Negotiations with several prominent
orchestras from Detroit, Toledo, Chi-
cago, and Columbus, for the dance
music are now being carried on, and
final selection will insure the best
music possible for the dance.
The committee is planning several
variety features in addition to the reg-
ular .dancing. Programs and favors
are being planned to conform to the
professional air of the event. At this
time, the Crease paper, the annual
" razz sheet"' of the Law school, will
make its appearance.

MEDICAL CONGRSSI
OPENS IN DETROIT
Physilans From All Parts Of CountryI
Hear Experts Speak On Internal
Organs At Clinical Session
WILL VISIT ANN ARBOR
DETROIT, Feb. 22.-With more
than 1,500 physicians from all parts
of the country here for the occasion,
the tenth annual clinical session of
the American Congress on Internalt
Medicine opened today at the Book
Cadillac hotel. The first sessions oft
the five day program were held this
afternoon and evening and a full1
schedule of demonstrations, meetings,
and clinics as well as a trip to Anns
Arbor where the Congress will con-
vene Thursday at the University hos-k
pital.e
This afternoon's session heard Dr.
A. C. Ivy of the Northwestern uni-
versity, an acknowledged authority onr
the mechanism of digestion, discuss1
the causes of "pan creatic" secretion,
describing their practical advantagesc
and the mechanisms concerned. He
was followed by Dr. William C. Mc-
Carty, of the Mayo clinic, Rochester,'
Minn., who talked on pathological
and clinical investigations into the
significance of the gastric ulcer. The
third speaker, Dr. George W. Crile, ofi
Cleveland, considered the liver from t
the standpoint of the investigator,
physician and surgeon.
The evening session was addressed
by Prof. James M. Anders, of Phila-
delphia, and Prof. Knud Faber, of
Copenhagen, after which a receptionk
was given in honor of Dr. Charles G.f
Jennings, president of the Congress. .
The physicians are expressing a
great deal of interest in the sessiont
to be held Thursday in Ann Arbor.
'An interesting and unusual scientificI
program has been arranged which the
program of the Congress calls "the
world famous clinics and laboratories
of the University of Michigan." All
members of the medical profession
resident in or about Detroit, whether3
or not they are fellows of the Con-
gress, are invited to take this trip
and all indications point to a large
attendance.
Country Honors
Washington With
Public Activities
(By Asociated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.-The capi-
tal joined with the remainder of the
country today to honor the memory
of George Washington.
Numbers of public ceremonies wereI
arranged by patriotic organizations
without regard for the recent contro-
versy over the personal habits of the
first president and the newer debate
over how he would stand on the pro-
hibition issue.
In Congress, time was set apart
from legislative duties for the reading
in both houses of Washington's fare-
well address and tonight President
Coolidge himself will deliver an ad-
dress before the National Education
association. The, speech will be
heard throughout the country over
radio.
Sharing the center of the day's
activities with the capital weredthe
Mount Vernon home and tomb of
Washington and the George Washing-
ton Masonic national memorial, now
under construction near Arlington,
Va . Boy Scouts and war veterans of
the city and points nearby assembled
form a pilgrimage to Mount Vernon,
while Masons prepared a program at
the memorial temple.
Obeservance of the anniversary

here was arranged on a scale perhaps

PREMISE OF WETS
is "SAVEYOTHS"1
Plea For Modified Prohibition Made
On Grounds That It Wil Help
To Correct Alleged Evils
CONDITIONS ASSAILED
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.-The battle
cry of the anti-prohibitionist for a
modified form of prohibition to cor-
rect alleged evils among the youth of
today and save the morals of the com-
ing generation was sounded today and
tonight by numerous speakers at the
second annual "face-the-facts" con-
ference of the association against the
prohibition amendment.
Called to meet on what was de-
scribed as a propitious day in view
of the principles of liberty and self-
control taught by George Washington,
hundreds of delegates to the confer-
ence heard a series of emphatic
speeches in support of legislation for
legalization of light wines and beer by
members of Congress, the clergy,
leaders of women's clubs and others.
The speakers generally assailed the
conditions which have arisen with
prohibitio, declared six years of the
law had shown it could not be en-
forced, and called for immediate re-
lief. Senator Edge, Republican, N. J.,
one of the recognized "wet" leaders
in Congress, renewed at the associa-
tion's Washington birthday banquet
tonight the vigorous attack launched
during an afternoon session at which
Senator Edwards, Democrat, of the
same state, was the principal speaker.
Declaring the drive of the modifica-
tionists was "not a campaign for
booze, but rather a pract _-al effort
for temperance unobservable today,"
Senator Edge said he would welcome
a nationwide referendum on modifica-
tion of the Volstead act and amend-
ment of the Eighteenth Amendment
"to a point of common-sense legaliz-,
ing of spirits with all safeguards
which can practically be devised."
"In that matter and that alone," he
asserted, "we can solve the entire
problem, if ever it can be solved."
Senator Edge declared a referen-
dum of this nature would "demon- I
strate to our lawmaking bodies the
changed public opinion," and should
carry with it "a concrete proposition
for relief so that citizens could voce
intelligently for or against."
He advocated a plan modeled some-
what after the Canadian experiment
and predicted an "overwhelming ver-
dict for common-sense, sanity, and
decency," if the law were put to such!
a test. He said he was hopeful that
at hearings to be held by a Senate
judiciary sub-committee constructive
plans and suggestions "will be
brought out which will make possible
the adoption of some such definite
and concrete plan."
Hubbard Breaks
Record In Sprint
(By Associated Press)
BOSTON, Feb. 22.--A world's rec-
ord that has stood for 18 years, was
broken in the seventh annual run-
ning of the American Legion's track
meet here today when DeHart Hub-
bard, Negro athlete, sprinted 65 yards
In 6 4-5 seconds. The old record was
7 seconds.

BORAH DENOUNCESI
WORLD COUR AT
SENATE CLOTURE RULE PRIOR
TO FINAL VOTE SCORED
AT BANQUET
MANY HEAR SPEECH
Idaho Congressman Charges League
And Court Are Contrary To Ideas
Held By Washington
(By Assciatd Press)
CHICAGO, Feb. 22.-Twice today
Senator William E. Borah, of Idaho,
inveighed against the United States
entering the World Court or the
League of Nations. He was bitter in
his denunciation of the voting of clo-
ture in the recent Senate debate prior
to the vote of the World Court issue,
i qq
William E. Borah
and of those who, he said, would have
the United States abandon the princi-
-ples of George Washington, which
have brought 150 years of peace, to
dabble in old world hatreds and poli
tics which have caused one thousand I
years of war.
Tonight he spoke at a banquet of1
the Crowe-Barrett-Brundage-Thomp-
son faction of the Republican party
in Illinois, which also sponsored his
afternoon appearance at the Chicago
Coliseum.
The Coliseum, the scene of several
Republican national conventions, was
packed to capacity this afternoon and
hundreds stood in the street about the
historic building. All tickets for the
banquet tonight were disposed of days
ago.
In his afternoon speech, made from
the old prizefight ring, built when
boxing recently was resuscitated heree
for a brief interval, Senator Borah de-
clared that the first battle in the fight
for American policies and principles
was lost when the Senate voted for
adherence to the World Court.
"We will lose the next unless you
people take up the gauge of battle,"
he said. "You can save the policies
of Washington and no one else can."
The next step is to take the United
States into the League of Nations, he
said.
He warned against the British hav-
ing seven votes to the United States'
one in the assembly of the League of
Nations, and the Coliseum crowd guf-
fawed when he said the United States
would have equality with Cuba, Haiti,
and Liberia.
Union Postpones
Billiard Matches
Until Tomorrow

Due to the increased demand for
entries in the Union billiard, pool,
and bowling tournaments this week,
the house department yesterday de-
cided to extend the registration an-
other day and postpone the opening
of the three competitions until to-
morrow. Entries will be received in
the billiard room and bowling alley

these newspaper men will speak Sat-
urday morning, March 6.
Beside round table discussions and
other special talks, an illustrated lec-
ture depicting the processes in the
publication of an art magazine and a
tour of the campus is on the Satur-I

association, to be held here March 5 eluding the li itrary, the gymnasiums,
and 6 by Sigma Delta Chi. Both of and the new dniversity hospital.

Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, will give the address of
welcome at a luncheon Friday noon.
After discussions in the afternoon the
delegates will attend a banquet, where
DirectorFielding H. Yost will be the
principal speaker.

BOARD FORCES 275
TO LEAVE COLLECE'"
Students Failing To Make Required
Grades In Itterary Colleege
Placed On "Ionme List"
PLACE 61 ON PROBATION
Final action taken by the Adminis-
trative board of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts Saturday
afternoon resulted in placing 275 stu-
dents of that college on the 'home
list'. All of this number, with the
exception of freshmen, will not be
granted re-iistatement until a full
school year has passed; to sone,
having once before been subjected to
a like action of the board, the doors
of the University are closed.
When the board had considered thes
last case Saturday, they had brought
to an end a two day task, and more
than 330 applications had been given
their attention. Of these, 61 were
given another semester in which to
bring up their scholastic standing,
having been placed on probation, or
having had a former probation con-
tinued.
While the exact proportions into
which this number may be divided by
classes is not at this time known, it
has been estimated from statistics of
former years, that more than half of
these are freshmen. In all classes,
no more than 40 girls are on the
'home list.'
Will Collect
Senior Class'
Funds Today
Records of all graduating students
having been brought up to deate class

TO MEET MARCH 8I
Issue Offielal Call For Gathering At
Time Assembly Considers
German Application
ISHII WILL PRESIDE
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, Feb. 22.-An official call
for the council of the League of Na-
tions to meet March 8, when the spec- I
ial assembly summoned to act on Cer-
many's appl'icati(n for membership
in the league, will open, was issued
today. Viscount Ishii, Japaneseam-
bassador to France, will preside over
the council meeting.
The official agenda published today
includes 26 items, but the list omits
the most important questions brought
up by Germany's application, that of
whether other states besides Germanyl
shall be given permanent seats in the'
council.
Among the questions to be consid-
ered is a report of the league's ex-I
perts on arbitration conventions and
treaties of mutual security registered
with the league. It is understood
that the experts have found that ex-
isting documents show that the idea
of settling conflicts by conciliation
and arbitration has been more widely.
adopted than is generally supposed.
This is expected to encourage the
league's disarmament discussions.
The council will fix a new date for
the meeting of the preparatory com-
mission for the disarmament confer-
ence and also will decide whether this
meeting shall be held outside of Switz-
erland so as to assure the participa-
tion of Soviet Russia.
'ENSIAN DISPLAY SHOWAS
HISTORY OF UNNIRSITY

GAME STARTS SLOW
Combination Used In Ohio Game Play
Strong Defensive Game In Which
Reece Leads Scoring
Joseph Kruger, Sports Editor
Michigan's new basketball combi-
nation made its local debut last night
at the field house and handed the
strong Wisconsin five an unhooked for
defeat ,winning 22-13.
Last night's victory jams up the
Western Conference race to such an
extent that it is impossible to pick a
winner, although the Illionis quintet
occupies first place. Michigan is now
tied for third place.
Coach Mather started the same five
men that did so well against Ohio
state Saturday night, playing Cham-
bers and Reece at the forwards,
Doyle at -center, and Harrigan and
Ginn at the guard positions.
The Wolverines played a strong de-
fensive game, holding the speedy
Badger trio Behr, Andrews and
Hotchkiss to a single goal, this be-
ing a spectacular shot from the cor-
ner of the court by the diminuitive
Andrews for the first field goal for
the visitors. Wisconsin made but
three other goals from the floor dur-
ing the contest, Powers, a substitute
getting two, while Barnum was cred-
ited with the other.
Frank Harrigan, delegated with the
task of guarding Behr, who stands
second to Spradling for individual

WHITE AND McNITT WILL ADDRESS \1" " 1 LH VUl
HIGH SCHOOL EDITORS' CONVENTION1 LV L I C DO A
Two prominent editors, Lee A. I day afternoon schedule. Palmer C.
White, '14, of the Detroit News, and Boothby, of the Jahn and Ollier En-
Virgil V. McNitt, of McNought's graving company, will give the lec-
Monthly, have been named on the pro- ture, and Waldo Abbot of the rhetoric 1~m
gram of the fifth annual convention department will conduct the delegates
of the* Michigan Interscholastic Press through the principal buildings, in-

XICHIGAN VICTORY JAMS
LEADERS IN WESTERN
CONFERENCE RACE

UP

I I

f

1
1
I
I
I
'I

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Illinois...........
Purdue .........
Ohio State .i...
Iowa ..........
Michigan.........
Wisconsin........
Indiana........
Chicago..........
Northwestern ....
Minnesota ......

W.
6
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
2

L.
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
6
5
5

PCT.
.750
.556
.556
.556
.500
.500
.500
.400
.375
.161

dues of the Senior class will be col- E
lected from 8:30 o'clock until 3 I Evolution of the Michiganensian
o'clock today in the main lobby of from the first edition, published in
1897, to the 30th volume, which will
Angell hall, Treasurer Charles D. appear this spring, is shown in the
Spencer announced yesterday. Oppor- display in the corridor of the Library.
tunity will be given soon to order; From the initialnumber, which is
Commencement invitations and an- laid open to an article entitled "The
nouncements, and it is essential that, Importance of Graduate Studies". by

dues be paid before this can be done.
An investigation has been conduct-
ed into each of the four class records
of every senior, and graduat s may
pay their senior requisites today and
any other delinquent dues they may
owe. Each senior is requested to call
at the treasurer's table today, whether
he has paid or not, to check his class
financial record. Students who are
taking combined curriculum pro-
grams this year and who expect tol
obtain invitations and announcements
and participate in the senior class1
functions must also report to the1
treasurer's table to check their rec-
ords.
Dues for members of the class of,
"26 are $1.50 this year, the $2 reduc-
tion being occasioned by the insur-
ance subscribed to in the class me-
morial fund.
An announcement issued yesterday
by Norma Bicknell Mansfield, chair-
man of last year's Junior Girls' play,1
states that the $1 paid by members
of the Junior Girls' play was not for
class dues, but an extra tax.
Norma E. Taylor, treasurer of the
junior class, will also be in the lobby
of Angell hall today to collect the

r,.,..,.,....,., ., ...... ..,.... ...,.. ....,.. ..,,

Prof. Robert M. Wenley, to the 1926 t
'Ensian with its brown and gold cover3
of medieval design, various steps are1
displayed, depicting the history of the
University for 29 years.
Numerous types of covers are in-
cluded, green with plain gold letters,l
blue with a University seal, andl
black with various styles of lettering.
In the 1902 edition, photographs of
students rooms with the usual com-
plex decorations, are to be seen. Uni-
versity hall, not then hidden by thef
new Literary building, appears in theI
page opened in the number of the fol-
lowing year.
In 1908, photographs of the cast forI
"Michigenda," the first Union Opera,
were published. The building occu-
pied by the Union, then in its fifth
year, is shown in the next volume.
,4Ward Record" is inscribed on the l
face of the 1919 edition, and in it are
shown pictures of the S. A. T. C.
trenches in Sleepy Hollow.
Etchings of familiar campus views,
such as that between Angell and Uni-
versity halls, shops along State street,
and the Lawyer's club, the entrance
of the Union, Angell Hall, and Wil-
liam L. Clements library are 'display-
ed as examples of art work in this
year's annual.
More than :20 year books from other
institutions, in which are to be seen
pictures of fireworks over the lake at
Wisconsin amid the words "Cards--.
Beat U. of 'C." formed of human fig-
ures at Leland Stanford, are also
shown.
By arrangement with the publishers,
300 additional copies of the 1926 'En-
sian are available, and orders for
them will be taken today, Wednes-
day, and Thursday by staff members
I in the Engineering building, the Li-.

scorixng honors, followed the Badger
ace all over the court, not only hold-
ing him scoreless from the field, but
permitting but few attempts at the
basket.
"Doug" Ginn, playing his second
Big Ten contest as a regular played
a stellar game at guard holding An-
drews to a single goal, and contrib-
uting three long baskets to the Mich-
igan total. "Ed" Reece, who starred
at Columbus Saturday, was high point
scorer last night, with two baskets
and three free throws to his credit.
The ;game started off very slowly,
with the defensive tactics of both
teams preventing frequent scores. Ed
Reece drew first blood when he sent
the ball through the net after follow-
iirg up a long shot, and Ginn followed
with his initial basket, but during the
remainder of the half only three bas-
kets were made, Michigan leading 9-6
when the period ended.
Both teams. flashed speedy offenses
with the start of the second period,
and a basket by Barnum and a free
throw by Behr evened matters at 9
all, but Harrigan connected with a
long basket, and gave his mates a.
lead they never relinquished.
Wisconsin threatened the Wolver-
ine lead after Ginn's third goal had
made the score 13-9, when Behr shot
another foul, and Powers broke away
for a short basket, thus bringing the
Badgers to within a point qf the
Mather outfit. Chambers made good
on a free throw and then Behr 'scoired
the final Badger point with a throw
from the 15 foot line.
With four minutes remaining to
play, Michigan began to employ stal-
ling tactics, which kept the ball from
the Badgers, although it did not pre-
vent the Wolverines from scroing
themselves, Harrigan, Reece, Doyle
and Chambers .sending the ball
through the net iin the closing mo-
ments of :play.
Box scare
Michigan

I

,(

7 1

until 6 o'clock this evening. dues of the third-year class members.

"Beggacrman" Will Be Presented Tonight At,
Mimes Theatre Under Direction Of Shuter'

Following three weeks of intensive direction of Joseph Ellis '26A,
rehearsal, the first production in introduced into the performance
America of Holberg's broad comedy, evening. The translation of the 1
"Beggarman," will be presented in was made by Prof. O. J. Campbell
the Mimes theater at 8:30 o'clock to- the English department.
nihth msAmy Loomis, a former graduat
ight. n Ta iv-cs ya (inm.nr o

was a typical medieval peasant, Jeppe ofj
last the Hill, who is lead through a series
play of burlesque adventures only to be,
, of left at the final curtain back again
in his low station.
e of Mr. E. Mortimer Shuter, who for
+l bthe first time in the nine vears he hasI

Chambers, rf .. ....
Reece, if............
Doyle, c (Capt.) .......
Harrigan, rg...........
Ginn, if ............
Babcock, rf..........

F.G. F.T.
1 1
2 3
1 0
2 0
3 0
0 0
9 4

Pts.
3
7
2
4
6
0
22

Totals ............
t'inamon

i

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