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January 21, 1926 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-21

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ESTABLISHED
1890

C, r

irt i!3an

tl

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 105

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

U

METS TO DISCUSS
BROAERCTIVITYi
APPOINT COMMITTEE TO MAKE
NECESSARY CHANGES
IN OPERATION
ANDERSON REPORTS
To Continue Investigation Of Charges
Brought Against Organization
In Recent Petitions
Centering its attention on criticism
which has been directed toward the
Union, its facilities, operation, and
management, the boards of governors
and, directors met yesterday afternoon
in their first joint meeting in years.
Wider support for the Union and
its activities is sought, and with this
in view, the directorate announcedl
appointment of a committee of three
Union officials, with authority to make
changes, in the building for the fur-
therance of its use and the stimula-
tion of better feeling on the campus
toward the organization. The con-
mittee is composed of William L.
Diener, '26, president; Richard Barton,
'26, recording secretary; and Homer
Heath, general manager.
May Lower Rates
Every department of the Union was
thoroughly discussed as to its use
and popularity. The problem of meals
served in the building, the feasibility
of reducing swimming pool rates, and
rates in the billiard room, were con-
sidered and referred to the new com-
mittee. The latter will go into each
problem in detail and take some defi-
nite action within a few days.
Prof. H. C. Anderson of the Engi-
neering college, reported for the in-
vestigation committee which is en-I
gaged in the matter of investigating
every charge brought against the Un-
ion in the petitions which were circu-
lated about the campus early in De-
cember. He stated that the commit-
tee is meeting next Tuesday for the
sixth time. Every charge, he said,
"is being investigated ,in minute de-
tall for the complete satisfaction of
all those concerned. Students, andl
former employes of the Union. have
appeared before the committee from
time to time," said Professor Ander-
son, "with testimony both contradic-
tory to and substantiating the charges.
A complete report of the committee
will not be available until next month,
due to the extensive amount of work
entailed in the consideration of every
charge."
Among other matters, the board
amended the house rules of the Union
to the effect that chess and checker
boards may now be obtained at the
desk for use in the reading rooms on
Sundays.
Asks Cooperation
Following the meeting, Diener em-
phasized the wish of the Union di-
rectorates that all criticism of the
operation, management, or facilities
of the building be made directly to
the president, recording secretary o
general manager. Generally, he said,
such criticisms are first carried to the
campus which not only retards cor-
rections and improvements, but fos-
ters ill-feeling and a general spirit of
dissatisfaction among the students
which are detrimental to the welfare
of the organization.
21 NAMED TO
1ENSIAN STAEF
Additional appointments to the low-
er staff of the 1926 Michiganensian
'were announced last night by Fred-
erick M. Phelps, Jr., '27, business
manager. The list includes the fol-

lowing, who have been working on
the publication during the past se-
mester: W. G. Bonine, '28, C. W.
Brownell, '28, J. A. Cunningham, '28,
M. J. Hudson, '28, C. B. Kramer, '28,
H. Patton, '28, C. A. Reed, '28, and
L. J. Van Tuyle, '28E.!
Those appointed to' the women's
staff are: Margaret Breer, '28, Louise
Briggs, '28, Margaret Clarke, '27, Em-
ma Goodwillie, '28, Jean Greenshields,
'28, Kathryn Kyer, '28, Mildred Peck-
ham, '27Ed., Louise Piggott, '28, Mar-
garet Seaman, '27Ed., Lucy Seeley,
'28, Mary Van Deursen, 28, Florence
Wolfe, '27Ed., and Esther Wood,
'27Ed.
EAST LANSING.-Fire in one of the
laboratories of the Michigan State col-'
lege chemistry building resulted in
damage estimated at $1,000.
%wOeather'.&

I

GRIDIRON BANQUET DATE CHANGED
COMBINED MICHIGAN EDUCATIO NAL MEETINGS CAUSE ADVANCE-
MENT OF SIGMA DELTA CHI AFFAIR TO TUESDAY APRIL
6; SERIOUSNESS AlILL BEGET MIRTH, BELIEF

Due to an unforeseen contirgency,
the date of the fourth annual Grid-
iron, Knights banquet, under the au-
spices of Michigan chapter of Sigma
Delta Chi, national professional!
journalistic fraternity, has been
changed from Thursday, April 1, to
Tuesday evening, April 6, it was an-
n-ounced yesterday. The affair will
be held in the assembly room of the
Union.
The date of the banquet was ad-I
vanced five days when it was learned
that the annual combined meeting of
the Michigan Schoolmasters' associa-
tion and the Michigan Academy of
Science, Arts, and Letters has been
scheduled to open at the Union April'
1 instead of a week previous.
Joseph Kruger, 26, general chair-
man of the banquet also announcedi
the tentative program yesterday whichI
calls for departure from the policy
of past yearsmainly in order to lend
more local atmosphere to the gather-
ing. Instead of engaging figures of
national prominence to address the
Gridiron Knights, the committee is
limiting the invitation list to well-
known students, faculty members,

townspeople, state newspapermen and
state government officials.
The principal item on the program
this year will be a discussion session
between members of the faculty and
others who are particularly gifted
with the powers of oratory. A num-
ber: of topics, covering pertinent
campus, city, state, and newspaper
problems, will be assigned. The af-
firmative arguments will be given, re-,
plies made in the negative for each,
and an opportunity afforded for im-
promptu discussion. All of the sub-
jects will be of a serious nature, but
wit and humor is expected to be pre-
valent throughout. By this means,
not only mirth alone will be stimu-
lated but also a certain amount of
serious thought, it is believed.
The discussion session will supplant{
the skits that have been a feature of
the banquets in past years. The
reading of epitaphs will also be aban-
doned this year to make room for
some new novelty stunt which is be-
ing arranged. An orchestra will play
throughout the dinner hour.
The climax of the evening will be
reached with the presentation of the
now famous Oil Can.

CONFERENCE BILL
HITS OPPOSITION
Minnesota Republican Threatens By
Motion To Return Measure To
Compromise Committee
$6,000,000 MORE SAVED
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.-Storm
clouds appeared today over the course.
of the compromise tax reduction bill
agreed to by House and Senate con-
ferees, but prompt ratification of the
measure by both branches early next
week was believed certain tonight by
leaders.
A revolt against the -bill in the.
House broke today with announce-
ment by Representative Newton, Re-
publican, Minnesota that he would
move to have the compromise sent
back to conference with instructions
that the proposal for a retroactive cut
in the inheritance tax be eliminated.
Revised estimates of reductions in
the bill as finally drafted by the con-
ference showed today that it would
provide for an actual saving to tax
payers this year of $387,811,000 in-
stead of $381,000,000 as first figured.
The more than $6,000,000 increase was
attributed to modifications made in
the corporation tax.
The retroactive reduction in the in-
heritance tax whereby the increased
rates made in the 1924 act would be
substituted with the lower rates in ef-I
fect in the 1921 act was voted by the
Senate. This vote, however, was
coupled with the vote for repeal of
the inheritance tax and the proposal
was not voted upon separately. It
will mean a refund of about $15,000,-
000 in taxes this year and result al-
together, it is estimated, in a loss of
$85,000,000 in taxes already assessed
on estates made subject to the tax
in the period since the 1924 act went
into effect on June 2 of that year.
Germans Ask For
Permanent Seat
(By Associated Press)
BERLIN, Feb. 20.-The foreign af-
1 lairs committee of the ReichstagI
adopted a resolution declaring
that Germany's application of adinis-
sion to the League of Nations was
made on condition that a permanentl
seat in the council be accorded her
at the forthcoming session at Ge-
neva without any other changes be-
ing made in the council's composition.
All members of the committee voted
for the resolution except the com-I
munists and representatives of theI
extreme right parties.
LOS ANGELES.-This city, with its
perennial contention that the national
census never does it justice, today
claimed a population of 1,650,365.

FOR 56THMETIN
Representatives Of 700,000 Teachers
Will Consider 6--3 ethod
In Convention
WILL HEAR COOLIDGE
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.-Hundreds
of educators, representing 700,000
school teachers of the United States
congregated here today preparatory toI
the opening tomorrow of the 56th an-
nual convention of the department of
superintendents of the National Edu-
cational association.
Discussions of the 6-3-3 method of
education, which i.nvolves the junior
high school promotion system, is one
of the main topics to be taken up.
The plan which will be advocated for
general adoption throughout the coun-
try, would provide for six elementary
grades, three years in junior, and
three in senior high schools.
President Coolidge will address the
organization tomorrow.
AIRMAN CONSIDERS UD
PLANE FORPOLA TRIP'
(By Associated Press)
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Feb. 20.-In-
formation that the resignation of
Lieut. Henry Ogden, round the world
flier, has been accepted by the war de-
partment, was received at Kelly field
today.
He will visit Henry Ford's airplane
factory at Detroit on the way east to
New York and will investigate the
possibility of using planes built by
Ford for the flight to the North pole.,
Cestre Lectures
Proving Popular
More than 200 persons are attend-
ing the daily lectures of Dr. Charles
Cestre, professor of American litera-
ture and civilization at the Sorbonne,
Paris, who is now offering a shortI
course here on that general subject
in the capacity of non-resident lec-
turer. His addresses are given at 5
o'clock every afternoon except Satur-
day in room 1025 Angell hall. He al-
so speaks at 4 o'clock in room 2203s
Angell hall on contemporary French
literature.
CoolidgeImproves
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.-President
Coolidge remained in bed again today1
hoping to shake off the cold which
has been bothering him. Assurance
was gives at the White House, how-
ever, that his condition was improv-
ing.

JUNIOR GIRLSILLl
GIVE ANNUAL PLAY
IN CAMPUS SETTING
CAST, FEATURE NUIBR'RS, AND
CHORUSES WILL PROVIDE
135 ACTIVE ROLES
OPENS MARCH 23
Final Performance Will Be Given For
Alumnae; Senior Women Will Be
Guests Opening Night
Typically collegiate and designed
for a college audience is the 22nd an-
nual production of the junior women
to be offered at the Whitney theater
March 23 to 27. "Becky Behave" is
the title of. the production. The whole
play is essentially ,local, both acts be-
ing laid in the city of Ann Arbor.
The curtain first rises upon a book-
store, where the first act takes place.
The second act is situated in a gar-
den of a fr'aternity during a formal
dance.
Six In Cast
The cast of this year's play num-
bers only six persons, but the parts
are well divided so that the burden
is not thrown upon the name role
alone, the directors say. Twenty
specialty numbers and 16 regular
choruses are included. More than 135
take an active part in the play while
many others are working on commit-
tees, or will serve as ushers for the
six performances.
The six cast parts are as follows:
Mr. Pit, a middle-aged man who dotes
on books; Chloe, a negro helper in
the bookstore, who offers much in the
line of comedy, and who is scheduled
for a specialty dance; Bill, an impa-
tient bachelor; Jerry, a lovesick lad;
Bob, a happy-go-lucky student; and
Becky, who is "full of pep and a typi-
cal go-getter." Mary and Millicent are
the twins essential to a musical com-
edy, who manage to mix things up
somewhat because of their appear-
ance.
The music for the play has been
written by a committee of which Cath-
erine Buhrer, '27, is chairman. Mar-
garet Sherman, '27, and Margaret
Lord, '27, are responsible for the j
lyrics. Miss Lord is also the author
of the play. Irene Field, '27Ed, is
general chairman of the play and the
committee chairmen are Helen Reece,
'27, business manager; Marian Dan-
iels, '27, costumes; Norma Snell, '27,
dances; Charlene Shiland, '27, make-
up; Mary Allshouse, '27Ed, proper-
ties; Helena Knapp, '27, advertising.
Jean Kyer, '27, is assistant to the gen-
eral chairman.
Alumnae To Return
A professional orchestra headed by
Phil Diamond will play for all per-
formances. The first performance,
March 23, will be given for the senior
women who attend after a banquet at
Barbour gymnasium, as is traditional.
The last performance, March 27, will
be given for the alumnae who are in-
vited to return for the occasion.
Many sororities and dormitories are
cooperating with the plan for alumnae
night by giving week-end house par-
ties and inviting their alumnae to at-
tend. The Women's league is plan-
ning to attend to any alumnae who
may not have made arrangements for
accommodations. Dorothy Cline, '26,
is chairman.
Amy Loomis, '22, director of the
play, is highly optimistic regarding
the success of the play. Rehearsals
have been going on for the last two
weeks with unusual smoothness, she
says.
WILL PRESENT
INTERNA TIONALM
NIGHT MARCH 2

Exhibitions of oriental swordsman-
ship, a Mohammedan chant, and a
Chinese impersonator of Harry Lau-
der are among the things promised
by the Cosmopolitan club for the third
annual "International Night" program
to be given March 2. in Hill audi-
torium.
Members of the club have announc-
ed that there will be a change of
policy in this year's performance in
that individual numbers are to be
subordinate to the plot and contin-
uity of the production, rather than
having the story as it has been in
other years, merely a thread on which
to hang a number of disconnected
vaudeville acts. This year's book has
been written for the club by Prof. A.
D. Moore of the electrical engineer-
ing department and by Mrs. Moore,
who are also directing the production.
The scene is laid in a Persian garden.
The cast includes June Knisley

11

SALT LAX(

BINGHAM, Utah., Feb. 20.-When
thousands of tons of snow came slid-
ing down the canyon side, bringing
with it an avalanche of rock and deb-
ris, there happened at the Highland
Boy mining settlement what skeptics
have been predicting for a long tie.
Houses clustered in the very bottom
of the gulch were buried and set a-
fire, and their occupants smothered
and crushed with no chance of escape.
Bingham is known as the world's
narrowest town. It is in the bottom
of a canyon 50 feet wide. The main
and only street winds for two miles
along the base of the canyon, with a
row of houses on either side.
RU9THVEN TO TELL
of MUSEUM MS
Curator Has Directed Many Scientific
Expeditions in North, South {
And Central America
WILL DISCUSS POLICIESE
"Museum Ideals" will be discussed
by Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, direc-
tor of the Museum, at 8 o'clock
Wednesday in Natural Science audi-
torium. The address, which is being
arranged by Sigma Xi, national honor-
ary scientific fraternity, will be a
general talk on museum aims and
purposes.
The speaker will discuss the poli-
cies which should guide the different
kinds of museums, also giving a brief
history of such institutions in gen-
eral.
Dr. Ruthven's intimacy with mu-
seum problems has been gained
through his 20 years of experience as
a member of the University Museum
staff, the last 15 of which he has
served as director. He was granted
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
from the University in 1906. Dr.
Ruthven is the author of numerous
papers on zoological subjects, and
has directed various scientific expe-
ditions in North, South, and Central
Americas. He is a member of Sigma
Xi.
PHYSIOLOGIST
WILL LECTURE4
HERE MARCH 4
Prof. Anton J. Carlson of the physi-
ology department of the University of
Chicago will speak here on "Prob-
lems In Organotlerapy" at 8 o'clock
March 4 in Natural Science auditor-
iu. This lecture will be the second
of a series of four medical talks be-
ing given under the auspices of Al-
I pha Omega Alpha, honorary medical
society.
Professor Carlson is a physiologist
of note. He came to this country
from Sweden in 1891, and secured his
masters and bachelor degrees in sci-
ence at Augustana college in 1898 and
'99. In 1903 he was made doctor of phi-
losophy by the Leland Stanford Uni-
versity and during 1903 and '04 served
as a research assistant at Carnegie
Institute and as instructor at the
Woods Hole laboratory. In 1905 he
became assistant professor of physiol-
ogy at the University of Chicago and
tour years later was given a full pro-
fessorship in that science. He has
held this position ever since.
During the war Professor Carlson
served as a lieutenant colonel in the
sanitary corps of the United States
armies, and in 1919 was a sanitary
officer with the American Expedition-
ary Force in Germany.

;ITY
ONi

VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM STAGES
SURPRISE BY HOLDING
MINNESOTA, 1-1
M'DUFF GETS POINT
Visitors Take Early Lead-Determined
Efforts Of Both Teams To Make
Deciding Point Fall
Michigan's Varsity hockey team sur-
prised the Minnesota sextet last night
at the Coliseum and held the star
Gopher outfit to a 1-1 tie in a thrill-
ing contest that went into the over-
time period.
Employing new tactics to meet the
Minnesota style of play, the Wolver-
ines uncovered a smashing game that
completely checked the visitors' of-
fense, while offensively the Michigan
sextet outplayed their opponents.
Scores From Center
Harry MacDuff proved to be the
hero of last night's game when he
tied the count late in the final period
by sending the puck into the goal
from the center of the rink. Their
hopes renewed by the play, the Mich-
igan skaters displayed their best
form, and constantly threatened the
Gopher goal.
The contest started off with a rush,
with both teams mixing freely. Mich-
igan found the Gopher blocking tact-
ics just as successful as Friday night,
but succeeded in stopping the Minne-
sota offense from swinging into action
by fighting for the puck in the Gopher
half of the rink. The opening period
was scoreless, with both teams rough-
ing it up considerably.
Minnesota went into the lead early
in the second period when Gustafson
took the puck down the ice, and shot
for the goal from the side of the rink.
The puck hit Roach's skate and
bounded into the goal for the first
score of the game. The Gophers
threatened shortly after this score
when three nien, passing the puck be-
tween them, brought it directly in
front of Weitzel, the Wolverine goal
guard, but the Michigan players piled
up in front of the goal and prevented
a score.
The final period found both teams
speeding up in their play, and goet-
ting rougher in theirr tactics. Captain
.Reynolds and Gabler were both
knocked out in this period.
Defense Strong
With a little more than half the
period gone, Macduff scored the tying
goal. Michigan then started a deter-
mined drive to score and kept the Go-
phers busy guarding their goal. Roach
thrilled the crowd repeatedly with his
handling of the stick, but he found
the Gopher defense too strong, and
his efforts to score were futile.
Michigan played her best game in
the overtime period, completely out-
playing Minnesota. At one time, after
Roach had carried the puck up the
ice, and then passed it to Reynolds,
the Gophers staved off certain defeat
by forming a human barricade in
front of the goal.
--
Scientist Sets Day
For End Of World
CHICAGO, Feb. 20. - Prof. F.
R. Moulton, of the University of
Chicago, has fixed the date of the
end of the world. But there is no
immediate cause for alarm.
You may figure it out youiself,
he says like this:
The earth is 2,000,000,000 years
old. The average life of such a
planet is a thousand times a mil-
lion times a million years or
1,000,000,000,000,000 (one quadril-
lion) years. So it will go on
whirling on its orbit for another
500,000 times as long as it has
already whirled.
And when that time comes, the
sun will get too close to this plan-
et and pouf! That will be all.
Just like the snuffing out of a can-
dle, it will melt and be destroyed.

Library Remains
Open To-Morrow
All departments of the University
library will be open at the regular
hours Monday, though it is a legal
holiday, according to an announce-
ment issued last night.
Basketball Scores

BY ONE POINT
REECE LEADS SCORE
Buckeyes Gain Seven Poit Margin As
Second Half Opens; Defense
Halts Wolverine Rally
Special to The Daily
COLUMBUS, 0., Feb. 20.-Ohio
State's Varsity basketball five emerg-
ed victorious from a desperately con-
tested game with the Michigan quin-
tet here tonight, sinking the Wolverine
squad 32-31.
The game was fiercely fought
throughout, with both teams deter-
mined to stay in the Western Con-
ference race for the title. The first
Ialf found both teams fighting neck
and neck, with Michigan finally taking
the lead 19-18 as the first period
came to a close.
Ohio State opened up with a daz-
zling offensive attack at the start of
the second half, anti 'soon drew away
from the Wolverines with a seven
point lead. The Wolverines, forced to
fight an uphill battle, slowly dimin-
ished the Buckeye lead, and drew to
within one point of the Ohio State
total when the Anal gun was fired.
"Cookie" Cunningham, who appears
destined to again gain the honors as
all-Conference center, was the chief
cog in the Ohio attack, the elongated
pivotman sinking six goals from the
floor, and accounting for three free
throws. Dempsey also starred for
the winners with four baskets and one
foul.
Coach Mather started a new line-
up in an attempt to bolster the ma-
chine almost hopelessly wreq ed by
ineligibility, and this com nation
should surprise Wisconsin when they
meet Monday night at Ann Arbor.
MIglrugan_ .
FG. 'T. Pts.

WOLVERINES LEAD SCORE
END OF FIRST PERIOD

Where Avalanche
Takes Death Toll

AT

COURT FIVE DROPS TILT WITH'
O.SU,31-32;:1ICE1SEXTET TIES
GOPHERS IN OVER-TIME GAMEo

Harrigan, rf. ..........2
Chambers, lf. ..........3
DQyle, c. (Capt.)........0
Reece, rg. .... ............4
Ginn, lg..............1
Babcock, lg. ...........1
Totals..............11
Ohio State

1
,4
1
3
0
0
9

5
10
1
11
2
2
31

Bell, rf.............
Dempsey, If. ..........
Cunningham, c.........
Hunt, rg. ..............
Seiffert, 1g. (capt.).
Tarbert, l g. ........,
Totals ...............]

FG, FT.
1 0
4 1
6 3
2 0
1 0
0 0
14 4

Pts.
2
9
15
4
2
0
32

.Detroit Busy"
With Medical
Meeting Plants
DETROIT, Feb. 20.-Members of
the local medical profession are comn-
pleting arrangements for the 10th an-
nual clinical session of the American
Congress on Internal Medicine, meet-
ing here next week. More than 5,000
physicans from all parts of the coun-
try are expected to arrive here tomor-
row and' Monday to take part in the
meetings, clinics and demonstrations
on the week's program.
The opening session, to be held at
2 o'clock Monday in the ball room of
the Book Cadillac hotel, will hear ad-
dresses of welcome by Mayor John
Smith and by Doctors C. G. Darling
and H4. A. Luce presidents of the
Michigan state and Wayne county
medical societies. Dr. M. L. Graves
first vice president of the Congress
will reply for the visitors. The re-
mainder of the afternoon will be given
over to scientific discussions with
Dean Hugh Cabot of the - Medical
school and Prof. Robert A. Gesell of
the physiology department on the pro-
gram.
The evening session also in the
Book Cadillac ballroom will be ad-
dressed by Prof. James N. Anders of
Philadelphia on "Idealism in Ameri-
can Medicine" and by Prof. Knud Fa-
ber of Copenhagen who will discuss
the "Intestinal Origin of Pernicious
Anemia."
Arrangements for the transporta-
tion of the physicians on Thursday,
when the Congress will convene in Ann
Arbor have been completed. A spe-
cial train will leave the Michigan
Central station at 8 o'clock that

Woman To Receive Philosophy
Degree Earned 44 Years Ago

(By Associated Press)
BALTIMORE, Feb. 20.-Mrs. Chris-
tine Ladd Franklin will receive from
Jhns lHoinkins uiniversity next Mon-

was never fully demonstrated until
Mrs. Ladd Franklin worked out the
whole method at Johns Hopkins. Tt
is rather remarkable that the crown-

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