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January 19, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-19

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PACE M~'UM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- w~~-

'-do, , IN 0, 1 - . Inum

Published every morning except Monday
du~~rgh Univcersity year by the board in
Control of Student Publications.
:Members o4 fXstern Conference Editorial
Associationx.
I he Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
cm4dited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Enteredl at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Iichigan, astsecond class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$'' o o
Omlices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 1214.
SDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4825
t-- jut
!IANAGING EDITOR u
1 GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board. .Norman R. Thal
City Editor...........Robert S. Mansfield
Pews Editor........... Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor............ Helen S. Ramnsay
rports Fditor................Joseph Kruger
T"eIerapb Editor.........-William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editorst
Smith 13. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomas V. Xoykki
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
[rwin Olan Frederick H. Shillito.
Assistants
Gertrude E. Bailey Marion Kubik
William T. Barbour Walter 'I. Mack
Charles Behymer Louis R. Markus
William Breyer Ellis Merry
Philp C Broks Helen Morrow
P h ui l . B o argaret Parker
L. Bckifgham Stanford N. Phelps
Strtton Buck Simon Rosenbaum
' lI Purger Ruth Rosenthal
7,rar Carter Witon A. Simpson
Chamberlain Janet Sinclair
IeN-r Cohen Courtland C. Smith
C;arlton Champe Stanley Steinko
;;_ scue 1. Gutekunst Louis Tendler
J )~las lDoubledayt enry Thurnau
1lat-y I unigan David C. Vokes
Andrew Goodman Cassam A. Wilson
] tnes T. Herald Thomas C. Winter
filesKimball Marguerite Zilske
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

fering from paralysis who has just
ifound the use of his limbs, she is go-
ing to require a lot of practice,a lot
of unbiased instruction. No one
would think of permitting the grow-
ing child to imitate the gait of a lame
person. Yet there is always an ever- I
present, lurking danger, a danger that
finds its origin in a primitive instinct
-the inherent urge to imitate-which
may steal in unawares despite seem-
ingly unsurmountable barriers. If
women allow themselves to slip into
the ways of men, if wife votes with
husband, mother with son, they will
have turned down their only chance
for a rejuvenation, a rebirth. Our
greatest hope, our most earnest pray-
ers, urge the contrary. The political
life of the nation cries for new blood,
women alone can supply this want.
AN ANTIQUATED DOCTRINE
"When the Senate agreed to enter
the World Court, it indicated the col-
lapse of the policy of isolation," said
Senator Walsh in a recent address.
"It expressed the conviction of the
American people that some measure
of duty rests upon them in respect
to the preservation of the peace of
the world, ant that conscience, no
less than self-respect, required their
co-operation to that end."
Mrs. Raymond Morgan, head of the
Women's World Court committee,
agrees with him when she says, "The
main thing is that we accept the
Court and the principle for which it
stands . This means that the doctrine
of isolation is doomed, that the United
States is again prepared to take her
place as leader toward international
co-operation and world peace."
Both of these statements are true,
the United States, in accepting the
Court, is showing a willingness to
participate in world affairs which
must ultimately result in the discard-
ing of a great deal of the Monroe Doc-
trine.
President Monroe undoubtedly
showed great sagacity when he fram-
ed his famous doctrine of isolation,
for at that time the two hemispheres
were only loosely linked together.
And with small chance of involuntary
interference, the western nations
were able to devote nearly all of their
energy to developing internally-ir
forming more perfectly organized and
closely knit states.
But that day is past; with ouh ex-
tensive and complete means of rapi
communication, the continents hav
been brought close together, so thai
they cannot help mingling in on
another's affairs and overlapping i
activities. Ten years ago Europ
showed us that we could not keep ou
of her affairs, the Monroe Doctrin
had to be discarded for the time.
Maintaining world peace does no
necessarily mean entering the League
of Nations, but it does mean discard
ing or revising our antiquated Mon
roe Doctrine so that we can partici
pate in world affairs when the nee
arises without the opposition of met
who are living in a past decade an
I still believe in upholding the od
principles. This would not mean
leaving South America open to depre
datory European nations. The ma
majority of those countries are able
to take care of themselves in any
ordinary instance.

i

OASTED ROLLS
"MOVE AMERICA
j SOUTH"

BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

I

Advertising................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..............T. D. Olmsted, Jr.'I
Advertising.............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising................Wmn. L. MullinI
Circulation............... .. L. Newman
Publication............Rudolph Bosteiman
Accounts.................Paul W. Arnoldl
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Norquist
George H. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Carl Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
ohn H. Bobrink obert Prentiss
. J. Cox Wm. C. PuschI
Marion A. Daniel Franklin J. Rauner
A. Rolland Damm Joseph Ryan
ames R. DePuy Margaret Smith
i1ary Flinterman Mance Solomon
Margaret L. Funk Thomas Sunderlandt
Stan Gilbert Eugene Weinberg I
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
R. Nelson Sidney Wilson
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1926
Night Editor-LEONARD C. HALL
POLITICAL REJUVENATION~
Mishaps excepted, the effort toward
the organization of a Michigan chap-
ter of the League of Women Voters
mnarks still another step in the direc-
tion of the liberation of women from
stiangling bonds, man made, and thel
accumulation of the ages. No legis-
lative body, no court, no administra-
tor, however powerful, can make
woman an expressive, vibrating, liv-
ing admixture of organic structurel
whose impulses, ideas-the resultant
force, in short, of her very nature-

Wat this country needs most is to
e moved in its entirity about five
undered to a thousand miles south
f its present position. This, of
ourse, could be easily arranged by
treaty with South America, which:
ontinent would probably be only too
lad to move a few miles south and
et the benefit of a slightly cooler
limate.
It is all very well, this Florida
usiness, for newspaper copy and
hat sort of thing; but the fact re-
nains that a large percentage of the
opulation of this country has to stay
ome in winter and tend to its busi-
ess.-"Keep the home fires burn-
ng" and that sort of thing. It - is
qually true that that the center of
population of the United States is sit-
Lated somewhere in Ohio or Indiana
what's the difference) and it seems
erfectly logical that the best weath-
r should be geographically located
t the point of greatest population.-!
3ocialistic and democratic facts.
If our suggestion were put into ef-
fect, Ann Arbor would enjoy the
climate of Atlanta, georgia. We
:lon't know much about the climate
of that city, but it would certainly be
an improvement. The trouble with
the weather here is that it can't make
up its mind from week to week or day
to day just what it is going to be. As
a consequence it will rain in the
morning snow at night melt the next
morning and then start all over
again. This is hardly ideal. If one at-
tends a class just when the snow be-
gins one can never tell what it will
be doing when the hour is over. It
can't be this bad in Atlanta.
* * *
Below please find the first of two
of the poetic as well as peotical works
of Michael, poet laureate o f The
Michigan Daily. Michael, we might
add is our lost angel.
REHINISCENCES OF A JUNIOR
I
Tis now three years since first I came
Into this universe of shame
Unto this university I brought
The highest morals, cleanest thought
But now what have I?-Nothing.
II
Iy moral gone, my mind runs low
And I am' headed for below
No one can save me now, I call
Oh youth take notice of my fall
And follow not my footsteps.
III
Believe unto yourself my lad
And follow not the popular fad
When better reason tells you no
Then to the devil you say "no!"
And you may be rewarded.
M1ICHAEL.
* * *
CRUEL FATE
Or
A tragedy of Urbanity
And now a misfortune befell me
I had become One of the Cultured. I
read H. G. Wells and actually sub-
scribed to the American Mercury. I
was sought after at every dinner-
table because of my witty conversa-
tion. But, as I said before, A mis-
fortune happened to me.
Apparently, as my social polish
heightened, my dancing efficiency
and general value to the "Oh, Mam-
ma!" company of which I was a part
decreased. On this fateful day I was
clumsier than usual at the rehearsal
The stage manager shrply repri-
manded me, or, as the vulgar would
put it, gave me a helluva good bawl-
ing out. I shot back a snappy Oscar
Wilde epigram at him.
"So!" he said, Miltgrossily. "Queeps
witt smotterecks you replying, ha
Iss diss a system? Gerradahere, dope!
Yurr fired." So that wah that. Sho
out into the cold, cruel world withou
a cent for I had spent my whole
week's salary on books and Mrs. --

my meal ticket, was out of town.
What was worse, I had not paid my
rent for weeks; and, moneyless and
jobless, I was afraid to face my land
lady. So I walked the streets tha
night wondering what I should do
The next (lay I looked for work.
did not find a job. Employers did no
want nice young men of agreeabl(
appearance if they had no busines,
experience. So I had nothing to eal
all that day and the following night
What was worse, I needed a shave
Oh, that it had been before prohibi
tion! If it had, I could have gon
into a saloon, bought a glass of beel
with my last nickel, and with it
free lunch. But it was not befor(
prohibition . It was 1925, and beside.
I could not have got a shave and a
clean collar in a barroom. It simpl]
wasn't being done, even in the goo
(old days.
(End of Part Four)
YIFNIF.

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA
THE YPSILANTI PLAYERS
A review, by Robert Perry.
"The Drawback," by Maurice Bar-
ing presented last night as the open-
er for the program of the Ypsilanti,
Players is the kind of production that
needs intimacy and the success of it
in this smallest of Little Theatres
owes much to the contact between
audience and stage just as "The
Morning of Don Juan" succeeded
through the intimacy of the play-
house that was felt so well in the De-
cember production. Minerva Miller
as "She" was the alluring and ball-
bearing-tongued nice girl to perfec-
tion and Valentine Davies as "He"
was the stammering and awkward
boy-lover who had no chance at more
than a chance word, interspersed be-
tween the too adequate and willing
verbosity of "She." A nice little dia-
logue, the success of which was ps-
sible through the intimacy of the
house, not to mention the glib re-
sourcefulness of the nice girl, "She,"
which Minerva 1Niller interpreted
even to the indignation that her so-
cial position was in danger from a
Hangman's son.
And that by way of introduction to
the program of the evening for which
we were on our .toes for no other rea-.
son than that Pat J. Smith was to
Iplay the leading man, the same thatI
was still reminding us of his interpre-
tation of "Don Juan." "Mme. Beau-
det" played by Cora Lane Wiedman
the dramatic counterpart of a Local
Garage Owner, who literally took me
down the road for a minor sum while
I was enjoying the production, was
slightly too phlegmatic for the ap-
parent popularity of the French
Dameas which she washcast. We
lean indeed toward the more vivaci-
ous playing of Avis Thompson as
Mine .Lebas, whose stage presence we
were allowed for but a moment.
Patrick J. Smith, the same as lan-
guished so languorously through Don
Juan was full as well a master of
this M. Beaudet, a successful young
business man of immense importance
and especially as the head of his own
household. And next to this mater-
ful ass we were pleased by the inter-
pretation of Gabrielle by Elizabeth
Strauss, the chic French maid who
was the type to perfection, and who
shone beside the heaviness of the lead
to which she played. The banker
Ernest Goodwin shone both as M. Le-
has the common sense advisor t
Beaudet and also as the husband of
Mine. Lebas, of whom we had such a
fleeting happy glimpse. The 'haughty
Jacques Dauzat was played by one
Robert Schrepper, of whom like Mme.
Lebas, was say too little considering
the quality of interpretation. Nosing
Eugenie, played by Gertrude Lamb,
the wife of a local grocer was for a
minor part also one of the bright and
shining interpretations, this time is
being that of the irrepressible maid
of all work, including the family busi-
ness. Of Chester Loomis, Jr., as a
Clerk, we saw so little as to only
wonder what he might have done, but
who knows?
The one character that lagged and
was really disagreeable was Marguer-
-ite Prevot played by Alice Naffz. It !
certainly d id not come up to the
high standard of the company.
-I * **
PHIl)ELAII RICE
- A review, by Alan Hathaway.
Ten characters in a single body, ten
well dened personalities in one. F. W.
Robinson's three act comedy, 'David
Garrick' impersonated by Mr. Rice
caused Hill auditorium to be the
scene of an extremely pleasing dra-
matic interpretation presented before
a responsive audience. Instant change
- of facial expression and personality,
modulation of voice from a barking
bass to a squeaky falsetto lead the
play leap by leap from one character

to another. y .v
David Garrick, the gentleman, the
politesse of society seemed a natural
being. David Garrick the pseudo-
drunkard-one could almost smell the
- alcohol. Garrick, the gentleman, (is-
t coursing with Simon Ingent, the Eng-
lish Babbitt, subtle insinuations, re-
ceived with naive confusion. Chibby
the fop, falsetto, imbecilic grin and
the fact of a simpleton, Jones who
st-t-t-ttutters t-t-t-erribly, self-con-
scions and super-sensitive, Smith, a
t member of the 'change, hatchet faced,
sharp voicedrand stiff shoulders. Then
the soft, precise voice of Ada, the
daughter in question.
t Such are the characters interpreted
and impersonated by Mr. Rice. His
s skill is most marked by his versitility
t of expression and imitation. The
subtle humor of the play seldom fail-
ed to provoke mirth while the melo-
- drama brought forth an expectant
-Ihush. The women characters, the
e hardest for a manto imitate were the
a only ones not entirely natural, their }
character for the most part brought
out through the speeches of the men,
s as 'Mother Smith,' proud parent of
seven-seventeen-and finally seven-
y ty registered indigiltion at the above
d accusations of Garrick the roustabouti
in his assumed intoxication. The play
on the whole though, was admirably
suited for the interpretation as most
of the active characters were malP.

SKILLED REPAIRING
All Makes

In sure

'mr
r Work

the pen that
really works
all the time
The only Fountain Pen which holds enough ink for Student use.
It's a Self-Starter and Steady Writer. Will last a Life-time. No other pen
like or equal to it. Made, Sold and Serviced right here in Ann Arbor.
A Student Needs A Good Pen
Rider's Pen Shop has the only real Fountain Pen Service
in Ann Arbor or in the state.
A casual visit to a Medical College or school of Surgery does not
qualify for diagnosis or surgical operation.
Your pen is a delicate instrument. Do not trust it to a pretend-
er. "A little learning is a dangerous thing." We have earned the right
to hang out our shingle "Expert Repairing"
Pens and Ink Exclusively 315 State St.

I QUICK SERVICE

FRIDAY AND SA TUR DAY
Michigan Embossed Stationery
The popular large size In white 784!
with the torn dece edge

Graham ook .tores

WE WE
MAKE T
MA 10NN'S c
"A Wiser and Better Place j
to Buy."
Watch for Our New Spring Line.
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
(Where D. U. IR.. Stops at State St.)

All Wool Pre-Shrunk in Beautiful Fabrics That Will Not Fade.
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$0
Manufactured by
A. NASH & CO.
The Famous Golden Rule Tailors of Cincinnati.
Phone 9736
And ask that a representative of the NASH CO. call upon you to
show samples and styles.
STYLE, FIT, WORKMANSHIP AND WEARING QUALITIES
GUARANTEED.
Some of the best dressed people you meet are wearing Nash clothes.

A

cain
toEUROPE
(With college parties on

k .-

i

famous"O"steamers of
The Royal Mail Une
Writo for Illustrated Bcoklet.
School of
Forein Travel, Inc.
112 Cu 4te st., Now Haven, Conn.

0

,

are felt and influence the direction Science travels on. ahead of its day
of the nation's institutional growth, in this country; our statesmanship
the world's science, its philosophy, advances but slowly. But progression
the vi hole body of its knowledge.
Lawand ordyinancsn only ete.is necessary if we are to maintain our
Laws and ordinances can only set
these forces free, the individuals position for a great number of years+
to come.
themselves are alone able to put _
them in motion. The nineteenth y
amendment added nothing to the soI Do any of our readers know any-
addednothng t thing about an annual appropriation
called liberties of women. It only
released the bonds that for years for the buildings and grounds depart-
had held them immobile, another 1 ment,-and what is done with it?

PL EASE
DON'T
M AK E
ON T H E
CAMEPUS
Paths on snow form. Iee and kill
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use such paths.

LEARN TO DANCE
AT
SCHOOL OF DANCING
(Estialished 1883)
We teach everything in dancing from the various polkas
od to th oenCharleston. Private lessons by appoint-
eet, either at the academy, Huron Street, or phone 5822.
Iy
GRANGER'S ACADEMY
LeTt The Daily sell it for you thru tne Classified columns.--Adv.

:

amendment would not complete the
pi'ocess, the thongs that have been
cut niust be cast off by woman alone,'
unaided.
Segregated from masculine influ-
ence, where political tradition, in:
America at least, is apt to be deep
set and immovable and resting on a'
basis of judgment warped by ignor-f
mnce, working in an entirely new en-1
vironment in an organization all their
own, the franchise in the hands of
women should be an enviable weapon
toward invigorated, healthy political
growth. The establishment and pro-1
mulgation of institutions that willl
make such a condition possible isI
worthy of every encouragement. Bet-I
ter indeed and even more worthy of
commendation is the attempt that ap-
pears to have been made to carry
these influences to the universities.
The-e is to be found youth on the(
threshold of maturity, but yet unde-f
fil-d by ancestoral prejudices. Thef
university woman is the most readyj
to formulate her own political philo-
sophy if but given the materials with1
which to work. The ordinary course
in government andl politics is not1
enough, something more immediate is

EDITORIAL COMMENT
MAKI\G A FRIEND OF BOREAS
(The Minneapolis Journal)
Thirteen inches of snow paralyzed
the cities of the North Atlantic sea-
board., New York and Boston were
just about helpless in a situation that
would have discommoded Minneapolis
only slightly.
Why? Because the dwellers in
those. Eastern cities have not learned
like Minneapolis, how to live in kindly
neighborliness with old Boreas. Wej
meet the snow as a friend. They
shrink from the snow as a deadly
enemy. New Yorkers flock to famed
Adirondack resorts for the zest of
winter sports. But, given the same
conditions at their doorsteps, they
seem virtually helpless.
In a region where winter's visit is
normally continuous over a period of
two or three months, we have an in-
timate acquaintance with Boreas. We.
know what he can do. But we also
know what he can not do. We know,
for one thing, that he can not stop us,

0 .

c~acocaoco~

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101-105S. MAIN ST.--ANN ARBOR, MICH.---330 S. STATE

SAVE AT LEAST 10% OF YOUR

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