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January 16, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 1926
I 'IST EON-RESIDEN
SUMMERSEKR
Representatives Of Colleges From All
Sections Of The Country Are
Expected To Come
MANY ARE ANNOUNCED

THEMICHIGAN DAILY

I

COURT APPROVES BUYING
f' LOTS I3Y UNIVERSITY
Condemnation proceedings in-
stituted by the University for
two lots on the site for the new
Architectural building have been
settled in the Circuit court in fa'-
vor of the University. The court
deccIded that the price offered by
the university for one of the lots
was fair, and for the other low-
ered by $1,000 the price offered
by the University to the owner.

Typographical Union Buys Murdock's Home

'
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Scholars from all sections of thi
#ountry will lecture during the 192(
hummer session, according to infor
nation released yesterday by Dean
Edward H. Kraus. Thirty-four non
besident lecturers will conduct cours
e' in the various departments dur-
fng the approaching summer period
In the School of Education, which
Is offering 71 courses during the
summer session, there will appear the
bollowing outside lecturers: Wendel
. Brooks, of the school of education
find assistant dean of the college of
Iberal arts, Northw'estern university;
L. A. Butler superintendent of schools,
Newton, Mass.; Prof. Theodore W. H.
Irion, Michigan State Normal college;
Frank A. Jensen, superintendent of
schools, Rockford, Ill.; Paul T. Ran-
kin, assistant director of research of
the Detroit Board of Education; Per-
Ma Stine, State Normal school, Minot,
t N D. and Milo H. Stuart, principal
mf Arsenal Technical High School, In-
lanapolis, Ind.
Law School Staff
On the staff of the law school are
Prof. Merton L. Ferson, dean of the
law school of the University of North
Carolina; Prof. George P. Costigan of
the University of Califor-nia; Prof.
dames L. Parks of the University of
Missouri; Prof. Rollin M. Perkins,
Ltate University of Iowa; and Prof.
[errill I. Schnebly, Indiana univer-
dty.
Courses in history will be given by
jhe following non-resident .lectu'ers:
Vrof. Frank M. Anderson, Dartmouth
Sollege, Prof. Charles E. Chapman of
the University of California; Prof. Ar-
hur C. Cole of Ohio State university;
;rof. Orren C. Hormell, Bowdoin col-
}ege; and Prof. August C. Krey of the
Ijniversity of Minnesota.
i Two men who will offer courses in
the English department are: Prof. G.
. Stewart of the University of Cali-
tornia; and Prof. John H. Caskey of
iillsdale college.
Other Scholars Secured
In addition to the above enumerated
Jecturers several other scholars will
)in the various teaching staffs at
the. opening of the summer school.
Prof. Ray Keeslar Immel, dean of the
stch1 of speech of the University of
outh California, formerly head of the
Niblic speaking department of the
University, will teach in that depart-
ent. Others who will come are:
William J. V. Deacon, director of
e beau of vital statistics "of the
chigan State Board of Health; Julia
Elliott, director of indexers, Chi-
1- go; Prof. Frank C. Gates of botany
partment, Kansas State Agricultural
llege; Dr. Augustus W. Hayes of the
dpartment of Sociology, Iowa State
Illege; Dr. Herbert B. Hungerford,
ofessor on entomology of the Uni-
versity of Kansas; Prof. Rollin C.
runter of the oratory department,
%hio Wesleyan university; Gerald R.
MacCarthy of the geology dpeartment
0f the University of North Carolina;
rof. George E. Nichols of the botany
dpartment, Sheffield Scientific school,
Yle university; Grace Walker Nich-
as, of New Haven, Conn., who will
s rve as dean of women at the Uni-
vrsity biological station at Douglas
Lke, near Cheyboygan, Mich.; Prof.
Beniamin D. Merritt of the classics
department, Princeton university;
ay D. Slinker, director of business
ministration, of thercity schools,
s Moines, Ia.; and Dr. Frank L.
Ipman, reference librarian of the
lbw York State Library, Albany, N.Y.
uthe Discusses
Cummings' Speech
On-'Ice Age Life
Commenting on a paper given be-
fre the American Association for the
- d vancement of Science at Kansas
ty, in which Dr. Byron Cummings,
professor of archeology at the Univer-
ssty of Arizona, asserted that abun-
4"nt evidence has now been gathered
i,' the Southwest, in California, and

n Mexico, to establish the existence
men in the country during the age
of glaciers, in association with mai-
ioths, mastodons, and other extinct
animals. Dr. Carl E. Guthe, of the
mlseum of anthropology gave the fol-
1Iving statement:
"r. Cummings has given his point
of.view on a question which has baf-
fled anthropologists for decades. Up
to the present, all the evidence
brought forward to show the exist-
ence of Pleistocene man in the New
World has lacked the absolute proofs
necessary to establish his presence
upon this continent as a fact.
"The problem is of such importance
that the greatest possible care must
be taken to examine all evidence with
asolute impartiality and from every
angle. There are many who firmly
believe that incontrovertible evidence
of Pleistocene moan in the New World
vill ultimately be found, but until
┬░ch an event occurs, the discussion
cf the theory, even if it becomes acri-

Uraduate Of 1859 Describes Cantpu Other subjects treated in the maga-
Life Under Administration Of zine are the Henry Por'd historical
President Tappan collection at Dearborn, the work of
women's clubs of the ;state, local his-
With a photograph of Michigan's tory of the Lansing region, and an
latest executive, jClarence Cook Little, article on protection against fakes in
on its cover, and two articles on the the field of optometry.
University's first head, Henry Phillip The magazine is a state publication,
Tappan, the Michigan History Maga- issued by the Michigan Historical
zine for January has recently been is- commission, for the purpose of en-
sued. One of these articles is by Dr. couraging interest in ptate history.
John Parker Stoddard, who was a
student under President Tappan's ad- BRITISH FAIIILIES PREPARE
ministration, who tells of campus life i FOR EMIGRATION TO CANADA
at that ,time. -_.:
Newspaper men of the state are to LONDON, Jan. 15.-More than 600
be the subjects of a series beginning British families are waiting to sail
in this issue. Michael J. Dee, of the !for Canada in the spring, having been
Detroit News, is the first whose life is accepted- by the Canadian director of
taken up. The author of this series is immigration.
George Catlin, of the present News
staff. PAY YOURJI SUBSCRIPTION NOW.

CINEMA USED
- A T HOSPITA L
JIiCIEY CALLS .TION PICTURES
CREAT All) TO -IEDICAI
l. EDUCATION
MANY FILMS ARE TAKEN
, Motion pictures are now being used
* in connection with a large part of the
demonstration and social work at the'
University hospital. A machine was
secured several months ago and now
requires the services of a hospital
photographer who supervises the
tshowing of the pictures, as well as'
the actual photographing. This fea-
ture is becoming a very important
part of medical education in the
opinion of Dr. Preston M. Hickey of
the hospital staff.
"Moving pictures serve to fill a gap
left by the clinic," he said. "Many
cases enter the hospital that are too
rare for frequent clinical demonstra-
tion. But by photography, it is pos-
sible to provide the students living il_
lustrations of the action of certaini
maladies that otherwise they could
study only from the pages of a text
book. I believe that motion pictures
are becoming a great aid to medical
education."
The hospital also uses films for
keeping records of bone and joint
oases, paralitics and others. Through
pictures it is possible to follow their
improvement from month to month,
as it gives the doctors a photograph
of the patient's exact condition on en-
trance and at various periods of the
illness and convalescence.
The social service department uses
the films for two purposes. The chil-
dren in the wards are entertained
several times a week, and an excel-
lent medium is provided for the de-
partment to present its work to out-
siders. A reel was taken of the
Christmas celebration and recently
shown before the University women.-
In this way a number of persons who
never visit the building are shown the
nature and the importance of the i
work this department is doing for the
patients. The sub-title at the end of
the Christmas reel reminds the audi-
ence that there are 300 children in
hospital 365 days a year, all needing
he.lp
ARICA, Chile. - The Tacna-Arica
plebiscitary commission has ordered
last Wednesday's disturbances at Tac-
na referred to a special plebiscitary
court for investigation and trial.

.-.r:.-----...-..-" . ..- I

The palatial home above, formerly owned by
tion man, has now become the new headquarters of
offices in the Indiana city.

the late Samuel
the International

'Belgian Prize Is CHICAGO.-Knit brows and clench- WASHINGTON. - Discontinuance
ed fists enable one to think hearder, of publicity of income tax returns Was
1 on By American according to A. G. Bills of the Univer- approved today by the senate finance
sity of Chicago psychology depart- committee, in accepting this provision
(By Associated Press) ment. in the house tax bill.
CAMBRIDGE Mass., Jan. 15.-For
the second time, an American has won
the prize awarded annually by the
Royal Academy of Belgium for its
mathematical competition. The 1925
winner was Prof. William C. Grau-
stein, of the department of mathema-
tics at Harvard university for his
memoir on the geometry of surfaces,
it was announced here today.
BUFFALO.- Hoboes will be wYim
come here. Degink institute, which1 Europea d'back
will provide rooms for tramps and try.
to help them, has been incorpated.

i-

i

I

DETROIT THEATRES
T HIS W EEK

l

F I

I

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Sat. Mat. 50c to $2.00
LAST WEEK
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OF THE SOUTH SEAS
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The BONSTELLE CO.
In the Most Thrilling, Exciting
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GAY, GOLDEN. GLORIOUS
lossom Time
The Ideal Bros way Cast

LAST TIMES TODAY

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JACOUELINE

with
LOGAN.

CLIVE BROOK

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