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September 30, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-09-30

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ESTABLISHED
1890

at

~~aI

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 8 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMTBER 30, 1925 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

DIVERS.B N G UP
TWO OF THE CREW
M FIL-,FATED S UB
NOT X1ENTIONEI) BUT IT IS BE-
LIEVED BODIES FOUND IN
IN BATTERY ROOM
TIDES DELAY WORK
Westinghouse Electrie Company Gives
Special Lights For Work In
Darkness and Tides
BULLETIN
On Board the T. S. S. Camden
r off Newport, R. I., By Dispatch
Boat Chewink to tlhe Associated
Press.1sept. 29. - With the
searchlight of the mother ship
ship Camden and a half dozen
other craft playing on themi the
heroic deep sea divers, who have
so far recovered the bodies of two
Of the men of the submarine S-451,
sent to the bottom here last Fri.
day night by the steamer City of
Rome tonight resumed their grue.
some labor.
The divers work in pairs. While
one descended 138 feet to the
place where the S-51 lies and en.
tered her through the forward
hatch his fellows remained on the
bottom outside awaiting a signal
to drag out another body from
the depths of t he crushed sub-
mersibie. They to4leul frantically
and remained below for periods
of 45 minutes. several times dur-
ing the day.I
At dawn the Monarch and Cel.
tiry, the derrick equipped light-
ers were due at the scene of thle
disaster. These boats were sent
to make another attempt to bring
the submarine to the surface.

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CHRISTIAN WILL PRESENT FIRST
ORGAN RECITAL OF YEAR TODAY lb
Weekly organ recitals in Hill audi- For the benfit of the new students
torium during the coming academic in the University it should be said;

3TIMINY SHOWS'NEGOTIATIONS FOR First Gargoyle
Issue Will M
Encloswd by a cover sh
tMiumnphant entry of a
nlmounted on a royal ele
fi rst issue of Ga goyle, am
N'magazine, will be placed o
WSWNANIA l C M3ADEAIIS DIF ERENtE l UNSETTLED week from today.

ake
e Soon
howing the
freshman,
phant, the
npus humor
on sale one

year will be presented, as in past I
years, by Palmer Cheristian, Universityc
organist. Each Wednesday afternoon

at 4:15 o'clock Mr. Christian will of-
ter varied program of the works of
both classical and modern composers,
the total effect of which is calculated
to aid students and the public in gen-
eral in laying the foundation of a
sound musical appreciation. The first;
of these recitals will be given this
afternoon, and is open to everyone
without charge.
Today's program includes the Fi-
nale to the eleventh act of Puccini's
opera "Madame Butterfly," Andante ,
from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony,;
and the well known Liebestraum by
Liszt.I1

that Mr. Christian's twilight orgwn re-
citals have already become something
of a musical institution, and one
whose opportunities are npt willingly
foregone by older students.
Through both his concert work andE
his efforts as head of the organ de-1
partment of the University School of!
Music, Mr. Christian has gained dis-
tinct recognition as one of the fore-'
most organists in the country. Lie
represented America in the interna-
tional organ recital at the Wanamak-
er auditorium in New York city last!
spring, and has recently done exten-
sive concert work. Ile is also to
appear with the New York Symphony
orchestra in the opening program of
the Choral Union series, Oct. 15.
FRA9NCE DELIVERS.
REPLY TO_ GERMANY[
Teuton Reconciled to Outcome Of
Skirmish With Briand on War
Guilt Quest:on
FREN6H DETERMINED,

TU

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WfII'WIWLL APPEAR
AS A WITNESS
AIR EXPECT CALLED
lelogist ('hatr"' That Sugesiiols
For Ot a aain AirslipN 'sCour se
- cre Disregarded
(y Asociated Press)
Lakehurst, N. J., Sept. 29.-Disre-
garding the advice of his weather ex-
pert C'omnimander Zachary Lansdowne

(By Associated Press)
U. S. Submarine Base, New London,
Conn. Sept.29. -The struggle with the
great hulk of of the submarine S-511
was still on tonight, four days after
she was sunk to the ocean bed when
she was rammed by the City of Rome.
Two bodies were brought up from
the sea today, the first of the 33 men
who went down with her, that the
undersea craft had given up. They
were found by deep sea divers who
crawled through the tangled mass of3
wreckage surrounding the vessel and!
entered one of the compartments.!
The bodies recovered today were
those of John L. Gibson, engineman,
first class, of Portland, Oregon, and
William Charles Terschaner, seaman,
first class, of Bangor, Pennsylvania.'
The latter, a youth of 19, was a twin.I
His brother was believed to be at the
helm of the S-51 and to have been
washed overboard when she went
down.
The divers worked in pairs, each
couple working an hour at a time, but
their time beneath the water was con-
siderably more than that as an hour,
and a half were required each time
the men were brought to the surface.
Dangling at the ends of their lines,
the men had to be drawn up slowlyj
to accustom themselves to the vary-[
ing degrees of pressure at the differ-I
ent depths.
Just what part of the submarine
was entered by the divers was not'
made clear in the 'messages fromI
Rear Admiral H. II. Christie, in com-
mand of the rescue workers. The
most generally acceptable belief was
that they went through the battery
compartment hatch just forward of
the conning tower. The battery com-
partment was filled with wreckage,
the message said, and the divers
could see that a door leading to the'
control cabin was open. Whether the
door aft leading to the torpedo com-
partment was closed or not could not
be determined.
Tonight plans were being made to
assist these men with six huge elec-
tric lights designed especially for,
work at the depth of 128 feet at which
the S-51 lies. They were brought to
the submarine base by T. P. Anderson'
of the Westinghouse Electric com-
pany who offered his assistance in
rigging them up at the scene of the
work. Last night the (livers were
forced to stop their work because of
strong tides that swept them near thef
tangled wires of the submarine an-
tennae and in darkness they were un-
ale to accomplish much. With the
aid of the lights, however, it was
believed they could carry on the work
whatever the tides might bring.

NOTED GEOGRAPHER
WILL SPEAK, HERE
Harvard Professor Emeritus to Speak
On Colorado Grand Canyon
and On Coral Reefs
WILLC GIVE 2 LECTURES
In response to a joint invitation
from the departments of geography
and geology, William Morris Davies,
professor emeritus of Harvard uni-
versity and nationally known geo-
grapher, will present one of his ser-
ies of lectures before an Ann Arbor
f gathering at 8 o'clock next Wednesday
in the Natural Science auditorium.
Dr. Davies will lecture on "The Les-
sons of the Colorado Canyon," a sub-
ject chosen from one of his favorite
fields of research.
A luncheon will be given by the
geography and geology departments
for Dr. Davies as part of the enter-
tainment being planned, and in the
afternoon he will give a talk entitled
"Coral Reefs," to the geology depart-
ment.
Dr. Davies is a member of the Berlin
and Paris Academies 'of Science, be-
sides being affiliated as corresponding
member with scientific organizations
in cities throughout the world. He de-
veloped, largely, the American school
of geomorphology, or physical geo-
graphy. After his connection with
the noted Carnegie institution's ex-
pedition to Turkestan in 1903, headed
by Pumpelly, he was exchange pro-
fessor at Berlin from 1908 to 1909, and
at Paris from 1911 to 1912. The lec-
ture given in Ann Arbor is one of a
series of travel lectures being given
by Dr. Davies. He will lecture in
Syracuse the preceeding Monday, and
in Grand Rapids the day following.
Dempsey Signs
To Fight Wills{
(By Associated Press)
Niles, Mich., Sept. 29.-Articles of
agreement for a world's heavyweight
championship bout were signed here
tonight at 6:20 o'clock in a country
doctors office between Jack Dempsey,I

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Sept. 29. - The French gov-
ernment hah replied to Germany's ac-
ceptance of the Allies' invitation to
attend a security pact conference say-
ing that the questions of war guilt
and the evacuation of the Cologne
zone are in no way connected with the
discussions of a security pact and
cannot be taken up at the conference
which is fixed for October 5 at Lo-
carno, Switzerland.
The Quai d'Orsay refused today to
discuss reports from Berlin that the
German government had determined
to make the negotiations of a security
pact conditional on the revival of the
war guilt question but it is taken for
granted in political circles that the
German government has merely asked
the Allies an open question before
going to Locarno.
M. Briand, the French foreign min-
ister, declared today that the confer-
ence would meet at Locarno October
5, confirming the impression that th:
French government is satisfied the
opening session will be held on that
date despite suggestions to the con-
trary from Berlin.
Berlin, Sept. 29.-Official quarters
were tonight apparently reconciled to
the outcome of the government'
skirmish with M. Briand, the French
foreign minister over the revival of
the question of war guilt, evacuation
of Cologne and entry into the League
of Nations and were inclined to con-
sider the incident closed so far as it
threatened to wreck the forthcoming
conference over a security pact.
While admitting that the French
and British rejoinders to Germany's
acceptance of the invitation to attend
the conference left no doubt with a
respect to the qualifications of theiu
views it was .nevertheless stated at
I LUa f-i er nfiIIU rlUadYthat if IL t AI

hild the airship Shenandoah on her
prescribed course until she was
drawn into the storm that wrecked
her, Lieut. Joseph Y. Anderson aero-
logist on board, testified today be-
fore the Naval Court of Inquiry.
The suggestion that the ship be
turned to the south was made at least
half an hour and probably an hour
beforo he was wrecked, Anderson
said, adding that Commander Lan-
downe had declined to heed the ad-
vice because the aerologist had been
unable to point to any specific im-
mediate danger signal in the sky to
warrant the change in the course.
After the Shenandoah was caught int
the storm and had made her first'
rise and then levelled off. Anderson's
advice that a southeasterly course be
followed then in an effort to get out
of the storm also went unheeded.
Connander Lansdowne wanted to fol-
low it, but the other officers in the
control car advised against it be-
cause storm clouds were in that di-
rection
The discussion occurred while the
great hull was being buffeted in the
storm and the officers were exhaust-
ing their resources in trying to save
her. It was described as very brief
but the aerologist indicated that the
storm was sharp. Ile said he had in-
sisted strenuously that the change be
marl e.
Cross examined by the court on thisI
point he said whether the ship couldc
have escaped from the storm at thatt
time was wholely problematical.
"I am not trying to argue that at
southeasterly course would haveĀ£
saved the ship," he said.
Other developments of the days
were:
Receipt of a telegram by the court
from Mrs. Margaret Riss Lansdowne,;
widow of the Shenandoah's command-1
er saying she was "very desirous of
appearing as a witness."
Announcement by the court thatc
Captain Anton Heinen, former Ger-
man Zeppelin pilot who has criticizel
the new gas valve system installed in
the Shenandoah would be called as a
witness at the single session of the
court to be held tomorrow beginning
at 1 o'clock.
A formal request from the court to
Secretary Wilbur for authority to
move the investigation at the end of
this week after all available witness-
es here have been heard.
,SHLOSBERG WILL TAL
AT FESMA 9SSEMBLY.-
Military training and its relation to
commercial engineering will form the
substance of a talk to be given by
Lieut. Richard T. Schlosberg of the
military science department to the
freshman engineering class at its
weekly eleven o'clock assembly this
morning.
lie will be followed by Prof. Alfred
IH. Lovell of the electrical engineer-
ing department. Professor Lovell
holds a colonel's commission in the
Rceserve Engineer Corps, United States
army, and is one of a reserve oficers
list numbering 41 members of the Uni-
versity faculty including President
tlarence Cook Little and Dean
Joseph A. Bursley.
Vera Cruz, Mex., Sept. 2--Rioting
in Siunday's municipal elections re-
sulted in the death of two persons and
brought injury to 50 others.

IN REGAPi TIII I,) ll'N1TIAL
1 1!1: T PA YENT V
NO BREAK FEARED
09Mci?5 Remdn Silent011 (n ProgressI
In (lssing Gl)p Mhich Separates
The Two Delegalions
(t y .\ss ciat d PC-s)
Washinton, Sep. 29. Negotiations
for a settlement of the French war
debt were carried on beneath Ihe sur-
face today anld some progress was
indiceated(.
No official authorized to speak
would tell of the extent of this pro-
gress or say whether the gap separat-
ing the contentions of the French and
American missions had been appreci-
ably narrowed.
A joint session of the two commis-
sions scheduled for late today was
called off suddenly with the explana-
tion that the French had not complet-
ed certain statistical data. Another
session was planned for omorrow
and it was ellllphasize l. the Treas-
ury that the change in the plan in no
wise could be construed the negotia-
tions were near a break.
Spokesmen for the two delegations
declined to indicate whether they had
reduced the differences in the sug-
gested first annual payment. Tphis
differences involves, it was under-
stood, a declaration that the French
could not go beyond $100,000,000 as a
total first payment, while the Amer-
icans were said to be holding out for
$157,000,000.
YOUNGBOB LFLETTE
SWEEPS BADGER STATE
(My Asociated Fre )
Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 29.-Young
Bob La Follette of Madison h'as been
elected United States senator from
the Badger state, the voters today
sweeping him into office by a majority
tha will more than double his mar-
gin in the primaries, Sept. 15.
Returns from 1,584 precincts out
of 2, 692 in the state, representing
complete voters from 14 counties and
nartial votes from 53 others out of the
71 counties show him with a plurality
of 77,717 over Edward S. Diphmar,
Baraboo, Republican, running as an
independent, and a majority of 66,316
over his four opponents. His total
vote in these 1,584 precincts was
127,469. Diphmar obtained 49,752,
Williams George Booth, Independent
Democrat, 5,523, John M. Work,
Socialist 5,471 and George Bauman',
Socialist Labor 407 votes.
An indication of the complete man-
ner in which the scion of the house
of La Follette bowled over all opno-
sition was his victory in Racine
county, former stronghold of the reg-
'lar Coolidge Republicans. Young La
Follette carried this county by a vote
of 5,308 to 3,187 for Diphmar. In
only one county of the state, Rock,
in the same district with Racine is
Diphmar leading. In Walworth coun-
ly another of the first district regu-
lar Republican counties La Follette
losed out Diphmar by a vote of 2,374
to 2,274.
Milwaukee, Sept. 029. - Robert M.
LaFollette, Jr., was maintaining his
'wo and one-half to one lead over
idward M. Diphmar as the country
precincts began reporting in fair num-
ir" tonight.In 615 out of 2,692 pr-
:incts all of which were outside of
large cities the vote stood:
La Follette 45,829; Diphmar, 18,548;
Bruce, Democrat, 1,566; Work, Social-
st, 457; Bauman, Socialist-Labor, 131.
I CHEERLEADER TRYOUTS 1
All juniors and sophomores.
wishing to try out for the cheer-
leader squad are asked to report
1 to room 302, Michigan Union, at
4 o'clock today.

Former Air
Body ie
niands

TO END HEARING TODAYj
(By .\sociated Press)
Washington, Sept. 29. - Another
verbal bombardment was let loose to-
day on the heads of the War and
Navy departments by Colonel William
Mitchell, who already faces possible
court martial proceedings for pre-
vious utterances on American policy.
Appearing b~efore the President's air
board the former assistant army air
crief apparently undisturbed by the,
almost certain disciplinary action to
follow emphatically reiterated his de-
mands for a sweeping reorganization
of the systenm of national defense,
which when first proposed nine
months ago brought upon him the
t outpouring of official condemnation.
is appearance brought him face to
face with the very body created
largely as a result of his San An-
tonio statements in which he charged
that "almost criminal negligence was
displayed" by those directing the*
I Arny and Navy air services.
After being on the stand for more
than four hours, during which he
read a majority of the eight "con-
structive" articles he had prepared,
the board adjourned till tomorrow
when the witness will conclude his
testimony with an oral "destructive"
argument which he was unable to
give today because of fatigue and
shortage of time.
UNIVESITY OF. IOWA
TRIES OUT NEW PLAN~
(Ily Associated Press)
Iowa City, Ia., Sept. 29.-An ex.
perimient at the University of Iowa
whereby exceptional students will
I be graduated in less than four years
without carrying extra work is to be
tried out here this fall.
l'he system will be opened in most
I of the larger departments including
E English, physics, chemistry, French
and mathematics, in which examina-
tions will be held for the selection of
unusual students. It provides for the
"granting of honor credits to the end
that a good student may graduate on
the basis of these credits in less than
four years to the same extent that he
inight be taking excess registration."
Ihonor rolls are to be published at the
close of the second year, based on
grades earned during the first threeF
semesters of the junior college.
The plan also provides for specialI
classes for those who show unus'ual
ability.

The cover, which will be finished
in red, yellow and flack, is the work
9f Fred 1111, '27, who is the art edi-
tor of Gargoyle this year. The issue
will contain 52 pages, and will intro-
1ce Gargoyle's new policy of print-
ing ten pages more of editorial matter
than formerly. This action has been
aken in order to give the reader a
greater amount of humor and fewer
advert~sements in each issue.
ITE

Ilead Appears Before
(Treated; Itepeats De-
for Reorganization

PRESIDENT LITTLE.
FAVORS ACTIITIES
II COLLEG E LIFE
SAYS RELATION OF ACTIVITIES
TO CLASS WORK IS WRONG-
LY CONCEIVED
TWO ARE RELATED
Dean Cabot Speaks About University
Entertainment and Refreshments
Follow Speeches
Declaring that the important ques-
tion of the relation of outside activ-
ities to academic work has been
wrongly conceived, President Clarence
Cook Little, in addressing a large as-
semblage of men students and facul-
ty at an informal reception given for
him at the Union last night, believes
the reason to be that true academic
freedom has not yet been given col-
lege students by the educators of the
country. The words of President Lit-
tle last night plainly found much fav-
or with the students in general, al-
though it was evident that several of
the more academic minded members of
the faculty were not in full accord
with the new executive's views on the
subject of activities and their rela-
tion to text-book education.
"Almost everything in our method
of undergraduate instruction is 'cut
and dried' organized and clearly de-
fined in the form of fixed courses," the
President said. "Practically speaking,
we have only one or two methods of
underg'raduate education. The subject
matter gives absolute freedom. So
long, however, as methods of Instruc-
tion remain fixed and uniform, true
freedom in methods of approach to
any subject is not provided."
The large number of courses offer-
ed merely becomes a large number of
cells, President Little continued, in a
sort of intellectual prison, and to give
a man freedom of that prison, by en-
larging the number of cells into which
he may penetrate, is not enlarging
his field of vision to any appreciable
extent, he said.
Must Remedy Condition
"One of the prblems which th, fac-
ulty and administration muf fic e is
the attempt to remedy this condition,
insofar as existing material and op-
portunity will allow. In the meantime
there are certain very definite Jessons
which can be learned from the so-
called 'outside' activities, and can be
applied in correcting the academic sit-
uation. And while we of the faculty
and administration are engaged in this
task, we expect you as undergraduates
and graduate students to co-operate by
modifying your point of view in some-
what definite ways."
In speaking of intercollegiate ath-
letics as an 'outside' activity, Presi-
dent Little stated that they are found-
ed on the love of competition and on
the interest which one feels in a close
contest well fought. The fact that in-
tercollegiate athletics continually pre-
sent to the 'students unexpected situ-
ations, which must be successfully
4 solved in order to obtain victory, is
one of their most appealing features
{ he added.
Cites Fraternity Xthletics
The speaker cited inter-fraternity
athletic contests as an' example of
well organized intramural competi-
tion, but remarked that there is no
record of such competition in America
today between colleges, schools, or
classes within a single institution,
which is a situation that must be met
with a view to carrying out such pro-
grams among the larger groups of a
university.
"There seems to be no real reason

for disquietude in connection with
'the fields of activities such as music,
dramatics, journalism, debating, stu-
dent government and work of the
Christian association, as there is
among some purely academic minds,"
said the president.
"Although the work in these sub-
jects has progressed far enough to be
of very great value in sh'aping un-
dergraduate activities, nothing as yet
has really been accomplished in th'e
fields of reading, science, architec-
ture, the fine arts, sociology, and in-
vention," averred the speaker. "In
all of these branches of undergrad-
irate activities much might be accom-
plished by intelligent initiativeon the
part of superior students." He point-
ed out how inter-collegiate competi-
tion could be satisfactorily carried on
in each of these untried fields, and
that such competition would natur-
ally lead into greater interest in the
purely academic subjects and would
form an excellent bridge between that
nart of the undergraduate mind which

th oegn ofice todzay that it the t-
the champion, and Harry Wills, negro lies had been left concilatory the Ger
c l rman government would have declined
ILansing, Sept. 29. - The state ad- to participate in the conference.
ministrative board today released l The German delegation headed by
$35,000 to the Michigan State college Gustav Streseman, the foreign mm -
for additional work on the new horti- ister, and Chancellor Luther, will
cultural building. leave for Locarno Saturday, October
! 3 . De Luther although a head of the
A death toll of 26,000 of whom 10,- I government will not proceed to the
000 were children, resulted from traf- conference in the rank of premier
fic accidents last year. but as a colleague of Dr. Streseman.
Republican Wins
NOTICESpecial Election
Attention of all users of the
Daily Official Bulletin is called Springfield, Mass., Sept. 29.-Henry
to the fact that all material for IL. Bowles, a Springfield republican,
that department must be turned was elected to Congress from Presi-
in at the office of the Assistant dment Coolidge's home district over
to the President by 3:30 o'clock IIRoland D. Sawyer, democrat, in a
(11:30 o'clock Saturdays). Ma- j special election today to choose a suc-
Sterial brought to The Daily of- cessor to the late George Churchill
flces cannot be inserted without of Amherst.
a written order from Dr. Frank The vote was: Bowles, 12,702; Saw-
E. Robbins. yert9,067.5
Bowles majority was 3,635.

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Our''4Titea+1je tax {
? Y
s j

1,

--says it will probably rain today.

i

REPEA TED A TTEMPTS TO RAISE ILL - FATED S UBMARINE
Work is being actively carried on ..-''---~.-"
by the Navy department to raise' the
submarine S-51 (picture to the right), :< :: ... ;.;;. "::_.<.";:...,
that was smashed and sunk by the .::":"::.".::..:....
steamship City of Romhe off Block '. '.-----'--'',-... " <
island Friday night. >:7........ t-..r.

S - 51

PROVE UNSUCCESSFUL,

' 4' ,
f

"STRAIGHT STUFF"
"THlE MORE ~YOU T EI.T-

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