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December 08, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-12-08

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rACEF, OUR -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TULSDAY C3EC'FMRLR R_ 1921

1T11IF. MT 1 I1('lA F TT mT1hcY v11Li 1 2 CI L S5 t., -V.

4011111 i 0, IZ140

1

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year byxthe Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titlcd to the use for republication of all news
distiatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
fr.tered at the postoftice at Ann Arbor,
ichtiganas second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
aard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 2x214.
EDITORIAL STAFFI
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board...Norman R. Thal
City Editor............ Robert S. Mansfield
Mews Editor...........M.Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor...........Helen S. Ramsay
Sports Editor...............Joseph Kruger
't'elegraph Editor.......... William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B, Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Lcenard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thonias V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian t Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude E. Bailey Helen Morrow
William T. Barbour Margaret Parker
Charles Behymer Stanford N. Phelps
William Breyer Evelyn Pratt
Philip C. Brooks Marie Reed
L. Buckin gham Simon Rosenbaum
1 dgar Carter Ruth Rosenthal
Carleton Champe Wilton A. Simpson
Eugene H. Gutekunst Janet Sinclair
Douglas Doubleday Courtland C. Smith
Mary Dunnigan Stanley Steinkei
James T. Herald Clarissa Tapson
Elizabeth S. Kennedy Henry Tburnau
Miles Kimball David C. Vokes
Mrion Kubik Chandler J. Whipple
Wolter H. Mack Cassam A. Wilson
Louis R. Markus Thomas C. Winter
Ellis Merry Marguerite Zilszke

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

*1 .
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a4
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flected glory that accrues to them by
their mere attendance at the Univer-
sity . The majority of them make no
pretext at adding anything, they see
in the University a place where one
can take all, and give nothing. To a
certain extent, Michigan is mag-
nanimous and allows her students to
receive without giving, but neither
this institution nor any other can
make an actual exception to the rule
of Nature that one can get out of a
thing just as much as he puts in, and
no more.
Michigan will go on, regardless of
the attitude of her student body; but
Michigan greatness, Michigan leader-
ship, Michigan speriority cannot con-
tinue without their support and con-
scious co-operation. It is a fine thing
to attend a school that is "the leader
and the best;" it is a far finer thing
to be one of the reasons for the exist-
ence of that superiority.
THE 1926 SCHEDULE
The 1926 Conference football sched-
ule, drawn up by the coaches at their
meeting in Chicago last Saturday, is
the first in a number of years to pro-
vide for two games between the same
schools in one season. Michigan will
meet Minnesota twice and Northwest-
emn will play Indiana in "a two-game
series. The situation, it seems, was
brought about by the sudden adoption
or a rule requiring Big Ten schools
to play at least four Conference
games, and resulted in a deadlock
that was broken only when Coach
Yost of Michigan and Dr. Spears of
Minnesota agreed to sendrtheir teams
into action against each other twice.,
The new ruling is a wise move. Cer-
tain members of the Big Ten have
been devoting too much of their at-
tention to intersectional games, and
claiming Conference titles by defeat-
ing one or two of the smaller schools
and tying one or two others. A much
fairer race will result if each team
is forced to play four Conference
games; but the new rule defeats its
own ends if teams are allowed to
double up. When it is only possible
to play eight games in one season,
and there are nine teams in the Con-
ference available for games, it seems
rather useless to meet the same team
twice.
The situation which Coach Yost
solved resulted from the fact that
most Conference teams will not play
Minnesota. The two reasons advanc-
ed, that Minneapolis is too far away,
and that the famous Minnoseta shift
is illegal, do not ring true. Michigan
teams have been traveling north for
years, and the tricky shift, though
closely watched by officials, has sel-
dom been found at fault. To the ob-
server, it seems that Dr. Spears'
present sophomore team, which will
be one of the strongest aggregations
in the Conference next year, is strik-
ing awe in the hearts of others, and
that a Minnesota game on the, 1926Y
schedule was being strenuously avoid-..
ed by a majority of the coaches pres-
ent. If such was the case, Coach Yost
is to be congratulated on his sending1
his Wolverines against the Northmen
twice; Michigan has never played .an
"easy" schedule and has no desire tos
strengthen championship opportuni-I
ties by such means.r
However, it was an unfortunateC
situation. The majority opinion, both
on the campus and elsewhere, wouldf
favor the scheduling of Iowa, Chicago, I
or Northwestern, 'rather than the sec-c
ond game with the Gophers. Coach t
Yost displayed his usual sportsman-t
ship when he suggested his settle-t
ment, but a little less stubbornness(
and a little more desire on the partb
of a few coaches to meet any Confer-k
ence team would have made the move
unnecessary. The precedent is a poork

one, and should be avoided when ther
same coaches meet again next fall. z
News Item: None of the men on our
high school team were placed on any 1
all-American teams.

LYLVOlI. HL%

TONIGHT: The
"Tambourine" in the
at 8:15 o'clock.

Mimes present
Whitney theater

Advertising................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising.............T1). Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising.............Frank R. Dentz, r.
Advertising.................Wm. L. Mullin
Circulation.................. ewa
Publication..............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts....................Paul W. Arnold

* * *
"TAMBOURINE"I
A review, by Robert Mansfield.
The annual opera arrives like a
long lost friend, changed perhaps, in
name, but with the good old red wig
and radium costumes glorifying the
Michigan male.
The Mimes have made good their
promise-they have returned to the
musical revue type of show, but there
they have stopped. The music of
"Tambourine," while decidedly plenti-
ful, is too familiar to be interesting
save only in one or two numbers.
For a first night after what was re-
ported as an unusually good dress re-
hearsal, last night's performance of
"Tambourine" was carried off well.
The choruses were excellent, and one
could hear the lines, settings and cos-
tumes-both were splendid, and the
stage work was adequately done. But
the play itself-
To be brutally frank, "Tambourine"
is the least interesting Union opera I
have ever seen. To begin with, the
plot is completely evident in its
diminutive entirety before the first
act is half through. There are no
clever lines to send ripples of spon
taneous laughter through the audi-
ence, and the musical numbers follov
ech other in such bewilderingly rapid
order that such lines as there are
lose meaning.
Russel Gohring in the part of the
captain of the guards showed the
strain which was sure to follow weeks
of rehearsing nine numbers. His
voice, full worthy of the praise gener-
ally accorded it, was strained almost
to the point of breaking, and its vol-
ume appreciably diminished after the
first numbers. Barre Hill, as King
Rudolph, called back to mind the
memory of the strong voiced high
priest of "Tickled to Death," but his
powerful singing was hampered by
the weakness of the songs-three and
a small fraction in number-which
were accorded him. It was attempted
in some degreG, but there was no "Ode
to Ching Ling" in this year's per-
formance.
To Daniel Warner as the Princess
goes the palm. A laughing face and
twinkling feet almost made the audi-
ence forget bulging muscles and mas-
culine voice. He was most excellent,
and, had he been given lines with
which to work, might easily have
proven himself an outstanding star.
At least, he danced, and even succeed-
ed in putting a bit of new life into
the ancient cane dance. With him,
Stanley Lewy as Johann deserves
mention for the ease and grace with
which he carried out his dance num-
bers.
BelindasTreherne was a disappoint-
ment. Cast out of his normal metier,
he burlesqued a serious role in a man-'
ner which plainly indicated that "En-
gaged" is not yet forgotten. Gordon'
Ibbotson and Valentine Davies, as the
diplomat and Sniggs, drew the only
honest laugh of the evening in th-eir
song "If Any". Richard Lutes as'
Babe Ladeer was slightly amusing-
making the most of the few semi-hum-1
orous lines accorded him.
But the choruses. What if the
dances had been used somewhat be-
fore? What if the steps were well
known to consistent Union opera dev-
otees? The training was thorough,
the execution sprightly and accurate,
the costumes gorgeous and, though
the term be overworked, colorful.
Crowding the stage with an unusually1
large number, they still succeeded in
keeping out of one another's way, and
made the stage sway in time as they
kicked and whirled.t
Of the music, the much-touted "Ro-
many Rose", while an outstandingf
number, held not half the appeal
which lay in "Cameo" later in the
show. The "National Hymn" had thet
best marching time, and stirred the I

nrr TCT n ,Arn nn n n3A

VLJ IJJXIYI
-i
Imported intact, the Comedy Club
version of Colin Campbell Clements'
"Spring" took on new freshness in the
intimate setting. Amy Loomis and
Thomas Denton became hectic lyrists
under a Manhattan mazda, and, when
lone had begun to squirm for fear of a
cloying happy-ever-after, or setting-
out-on-the-sea-towards-the.-setting-sun
ending the burst of a dance hall "or-
chestra" transmuted the play into
vigorous realism, with .a sardonic
kick.
If that able director, Paul Stephen-
son could be accused of being a
moralist, there would be grounds for
thinking that Amy Lowell's "For-
saken" came next on the program to
stand as a flaming sword of warning
against poetic lapses such as "Spring."
'A draped stage, a white satuette of the
Virgin, a candle stub-then the Girl
Iburst upon the stage and poured out
I the brilliant monologue. Phyllis
Laughton has her own version of the
late Miss Lowell's lines. She gave it!
-her way. It seemed strained, be-
yond the fine point of dramatic art,
and was not convincing. The audi-
ence sat in sullen silent judgment.
If there is a criticism to be made
of the Ypsilanti Players it is that they
are stingy with the kind of work that
is their forte. In the last play only
was this stinginess relieved by ample
generosity. Dunsany wrote "If
Shakespeare Lived To-Day" in a
genial moment, yet he must not have
been many flights up from the 'Olym-
pic club, and certainly spared no
barb, for all his joviality. Played by
a doctor, a rector, an auto dealer, a
restauranteur, and a banker, the skit
enabled these men to find as much
pleasure in their parts as did the
audience. H. B. Britton as Sir Webley
Woothery-Jurnip and C. G. Whitney
as the octogenarian secretary Trun-
dleben, spoke every line, made every
gesture in the manner lifelike. Such
a bistrous profundity in their dam-
nation of Mr. William Shakespeare!
Incidentally, Mr. Quirk, moving spirit
of the Players, had the last word, and
fittingly closed the program.
T THE NORMAL CHOIR
Frederick Alexander will direct the
Ypsilanti Normal Choir of two hun-
dred mixed voices in a program of
Christmas masterpieces without ac-
companiment on Thursday evening,
December 10, in the Pease auditorium,
Ypsilanti, at 8 o'clock.
An important feature of the program
this year will be the choir of seventy-
five children singing French 'refrains
ito Gautier's poem, "Petit Noel," set by
Emile Louis, and a Russian ballad
"The Three Holy Kings," set by
Gliere.
The Choir itself will sing coinposi-
tions from the Russian ecclesiastical
school; a Bach Chorale from "The
Christmas Oratorio;" French and
Wallon Noels and Latin hymns to the
Virgin . The solosits will include Mrs.
Cray, contralto, in a new composition
by Zandonai with the finale for wo-
men's voices; Carl Lindegren, basso
cantate; and William Kerr, baritone.
* a
CECELIA HANSEN
A review, by Robert Ramsay.
With Mischa Elman passing into
obscurity under the weight of a tra-
dition which even his matchless at-
taininents seem unable to support,
with Kreisler in far off Vienna, it
would not seem too bold to say that
there are two artists on this side ofj
the water who are still vorth hearing,
and from whom we can expect even
greater things. One is Jascha Heifetz,

who despite his unbending frigidity is
nevertheless the supreme master of
the bow, the other is Cecilia Hansen
who made her Ann Arbor debut last

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For Your Next Party
REUEL KENYON
and his
UNIVERSITY RAMBLERS
ORCHESTRA
Dial 3233

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oh Ends of the Diagonal Walk

Ingred M. Alving
George 11. Annable
W. Carl Bauer
John H. Bobrink
Cox
7'tiaror' A. Dqnol
A. Rolland Damai
ames K. Der uy
M~ary Flinterman
Margaret L. Funk
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
I. lelson

Assistants
F. A. Norquist
e, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
Julius C. Pliskow
Robert Prentiss
Wm., C. Pusch
.ranklin J. Rauner
Joseph Ryan
Margaret Smith
Mance Solomon
Thonas Sunderiand
Eugene Weinberg
n Wm. J. Weiman
Sidney Wilson

.................. . w

-

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1925
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

j i un nu

11

Our Usual Mid-Week Dance.
Haven't you heard the others talking about the
good time they have had at Granger's Wednesday
dance? The music and service is exactly the
same as over the week end. Drop in for a while
tomorrow.

By the new tax bill, as drafted,
income tax payers benefit chiefly
from the $325,000,000 cut provid-
ed; normal income tax rates are
reduced from 2 to 13/2per cent on
the first $4,000 of taxable income,
from 4 to 3 per cent on the next
$4,000, and 6 to 5 per cent on the
remainder. The bill provides for
increased personal exemptions
from $1,000 to $1,500 for single
persons, and from $2,500 to $3,-
500 for married persons.
ALL THAT GOES UP-
Once upon .a time there was a greal
prize fighter, a man who had easily
overcome all opposition and won foi
himself the world's fistic champion.
ship. He was unquestionably "the
world's best," he had only one failing,
--he knew it. And so the greatesi
fistic artist of the age was defeated,
and an inferior boxer took the crown.
Not so long ago there was a univer-
sity, a really great university that
easily rated with the best in its part
of the country. This university not
once, but many times, not in one field,
but in many, proved its superiority
over its neighbors. Time and time
again it was proved, at least to the
certain satisfaction of its students,
that it was "the leader and the best;"
but there was one great trouble,-the
students knew it. That university
still maintains its position, its pres-
tige, but-in the future, in the future?
Michigan is that university, Michi-
gan it is that has stood with the finest
in all things undergraduate through-
out the years within the memory of
the present generation of students.
Michigan it is that has won here, out-
done there, and generally outshone
her contemporaries. Michigan has
boasted of being "the leader and the
best" and "Champion of the Vest,"
and Michigan has had good and suffi-
cient foundation for those claims. But
in the future--what?I
Because she has always been a
paragon to many, Michigan's great-
ness has come to be taken for grant-
ed, but not so much by the outside
world as by the students themselves.
The student body apparently thinks it
impossible, at least improbable, that
Michigan topple from her perch of
supremacy. Accustomed to" seeing
iehiimn iii +hva vn- -a h af+.larP a

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R
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CAMPUS OPINION b
Anonymous communications will be n
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as g
confidential upon request.
AN APPARENT REASONd
There must be, we supose some rea-o
son why certain departments of thiss
University are prone to dessimate thea
questions asked in mid-semester ex-
aminations by either shouting them
'rapidly at the assembled multitude or
by scrawling them in long hand on
the black board. From our unfortu- i
nate position, however, as a student'<r
who experiences difficulty in decipher-;g
ing such long hand at a hundred w
paces-and who oftimes experiences, t
equal difficulty in even getting the b
spirit of the shouting, we are at .a loss e
to comprehend. u
Last week we took five blue-books. t
In three of them it was just twenty' o
minutes by our dollar-watch till the v
professor had succeeded in satisfying it
impertinent students who insisted on c
an interpretation of his hieroglyphics j
or of his "heretofore inludd tn"

audience whenever it was repeated. night. Both are the pupils of the in-
To one deaf, I should heartily rec- comparable Auer.
ommend the new opera. His lot would If one were to make a cautions co-
de easy, for the vaits between dance i to the statement that Miss Han-
numbers are short, and the dance sen ranks with the ismortals, it
numbers themselves quite thoroughlywo be to say that she holds her
good. But one does look for some in- place despite the fact that she is a
terest beyond mere dancing in a pro- woman. If there is a mental reserva-
duction like the opera. Of course the tion i the utterance of this extrava-
actors may be able to make something gance it contemplates her too obvious
tctos ma be bleto m ke s met In effort to virility; if there is strength
of their abbreviated lines, but as i to her playingity; if there
stands, the show is a nice little song is rec ig, it is trcesltf of
and dance- ispre e v it is the result of
** apparent endeavor.
Despite that, her concert, a tough
THE YPSILANTI PLAYERS one both from the standpoint of the
A review, by Karl Zeisler. audience and the performer, was tre-
After seasons of protracted sitting mendous, thoroughly scholarly and
n balconies and straining of emotion-I entirely artistic, a concert, every
revealing grimaces through opera i number of which was well calculated
glasses, it is vastly soothing to sit to display the unusually brilliant
within an intimate stone's throw of technique of Miss Hansen. The
he actors and catch every lifted eye- Tschaikowsky concerto blazes with
mowevey ifletio ofthedifficulties which call for every re-
row, every infyection of the voice, sourcelofthe fiddler,andralthough at
every sigh, every whisper, in its nat- full forte her spicatto playing tended
aral, unexaggerated state, not as to be indistinct, and sometimes her
Cough coming through a raucous phrasing was lost, her performance
oud-speaker. This is the initial ad- was brilliant and far more satisfac-
antage of the little theater, and when tory than the slovenly interpretation
1 is augmented by a program deftly which the same audience heard last
hosen to exploit it, there is an en- May. Throughout the whole evening,I
oyable evening in store. the artist was hampered by an over
"A Mnnin f on .n n f insistentaccompaniment.

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WHAT WILL I DO

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FOR CHRISTMAS
Before doing anything else, stop in at
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Everything will satisfy as to quality and price!

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