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December 05, 1925 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1925

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COMPLETE MEDICAL
LECTURE PROGRAM

Pennsylvania Mine Operators Reject Pinchot's Proposals

Lawyers To Play Christian association is the
Santa Claus Role

I
4

Alpha Omega Alpha Announces Series
Of Four Speeches To Be (4veu
' Linde Its Auspices
WHITE TO SPEAK FIRS'
Completion of the program of lec-
tures to be held under the auspices
of Alpha Omega Alpha, national hon-
ovary medical fraternity, was. an-
nounced yesterday by David H. Con-
dit, '26M, president of the society. A
series of four lectures will be given
beginning with that of Dr. William A.
White, superintendent of St. Eliza-
beth's hospital at Washington, who
will speak Wednesday, Dec. 9, on
"Some Broadening Vistas of Modern
Medicine."
The second speech in the series will
be given sometime in March by Prof.
A. J. Carlson of the physiological de-
partment of the University of Cli-
cago. Professor Ca'rlson is noted for
his many contributions to both Anier-
ican and German journals of physi-
ology. During the war he served as a
lieutenantcolonel with the sanitary
corps of the army. Professor Carlson
has not yet announced the subject of
his lecture.
Dean Charles R. Bardeen of the
medical school at the University of
Wisconsin will speak April 1 on
"Standards of Build." Dean Bardeen
has gained a reputation through his
work in human and comparative
mammalian embryology, experimental
morphology, and physical anthrop-
ology.
The fourth and final lecture on the
series will be delivered May 6 by Dr.
Peyton Rous of the Rockefeller Insti-
tute of New York city. Dr. Rous was
an instructor in pathology in the
University here for several years. He
is especially noted for his researches
on the blood, cancer, and other pa-
thological and bacteriologiacl sub-
jects. For many years he has lb*en a
member of the National Research
councl and was chairman of the
medical division in 1918.
ARRANGE' FOR MCIGAN
AIJMEMY METING TODAY
Will Also Take Up Election Of New
Members at Conference
Arrangements for the general
meeting of the Michigan Academy of
Science, Arts, and Letters will be
made at the annual meeting of the
council of that organisation to be
held this morning. The election of
new members will also be taken up
at this meeting-.
Prof. Charles H. Cooley of the soci-
ology department, president of the ac-
ademy, will preside at' the meeting.
Lee R Dice of the zoology department,
is the secretary-treasurer, and Prof.
A. S. Aiton of the history department,
is chairman of the membership com-
mittee.
The academy is a state organization
of college faculties. Chairmen of the
ten sections of the organization, most-
ly members of the University faculty,
will be at the meeting today.
The general meeting, to be held here
at the same time as that of the Mich-
igan Schoolmasters' association, in
March or April, will be the 31st an-
fiual convention.
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW.

A

PEKING. China Cn Fg Yu-
dren compleiy znd o gi 'b
Christmas dinners will be appropriat-
ed from the treasury of the Lawyers' shall Tuan Chi-Jui. thi e
club, it was decided by the council 'to intervene and help solve he cr;sit
at its last meeting. The Student here.

I

Rejection by Pennsylvania mine operators of Gov. Gifford Pinchot's proposals for the settlement of the anthracite strike leaves the situation
virtually where it was before the Governor stepped into the breach. Moanwhile miners show no disposition to accept the terms offered them by
the operators some days ago, and are awaiting further moves of the employers. Leaders of miners are sho wn after a conference in Harrisburg,
Pa.: (Leift to right) 0. L. Garrison, secretary to John L. Lewis, international president of the United Mine Workers; Philip Murray, internation-
al vice-president; Mr. Lewis; Thomas Kennedy, secretary-treasurer; Andy Matty and C. J. Golden, leaders of district seven.

GODDARD APPRO/V
INCREASE FOR
Commenting on the recent resolu-
tions passed by the New York Bar as-
sociation to bring about an increase'
in the salaries of federal judges, Prof.
E. C. Goddard of the Law school, ex-
pressed unreserved approval. A late
number of the Law Review of New
York contains an article concerning
the meager salaries of men on the1
bench, and prints excerpts on the sub-
ject prepared by judges and lawyers
in the East.
"It is certainly time," Professor
Goddard observed, "for this matter to!
be looked into seriously. The char-
acter of our federal bench will never i
be, improved as long as we continue
to underpay its incumbents to the
extent that we do. The American
Bar association has been interested in
this for some time. While they are, 1
of course, primarily concerned with
federal salaries, they have also pre-
pared statistics showing the gross in-
'equalities in the reimbursement ofj
judges in the various states and have
recommended a more equal compen-
sation."
-Professor Goddard said that Mich-
igan occupibd a middle position in
the scale of payment of judges. "We
pay our judges much more than most
.western states do," he asserted, "int
on the other hand, the states in thet
East are much more generous. Par-
ticularly is this true of New Yorki
state-the very place from which this'
present complaint is coming.
"At present the better lawyers
,re seldom interested in securing
judgeships, -It- is something, of a
sacrifice for a man to undergo the

ES OF SALARY
e FEDERAL JUDGES
expenses of a campaign for so small
a salary as is prevalent.'dBesides,
;Ahort though his term would be, his!
practice would suffer while he was
serving on the bench. The only way
to overcome these difficulties is to
follow the precedent of England and
pay our judges a wage appropriate to
the dignity and importance of their
position."

Naturalists Will
Hear Heilbrunn
Dr. L. V. Ileilbrunn of the zoology
department will read a paper before
the annual meethig of the American
Society of Naturalists to be held at
New Haven, Conn., Dec. 28-30. Dr.
Heilbrunnf will speak on "The Physi-
cal Structure of Protoplasm," which
is a part of a symposium on "The
Structure of Protoplasm."
Each year the society discusses sev-
eral phases of some fundamental field
of biology and chooses men who are
autlicrities in the particular field to
address them.
The American Society of Natural-
ists is the oldest biological society,
jhaving been founded in 1883.
MADISON, Wis.-Simple and vig-
orous speech that the ordinary inteUi-
gent man uses is urged on journalists
by Glenn Frank. Ile would have them
write in the vernacular without being
lowbrow.

Kelly Speaks i DETROIT THEATRES I
On j T H IS W EEK K
3 On Education __T_____WEEK
Eves. - 50c to $2.50I
ARR IC Wed Mat.50c to$1.50
Most high school students who ex-e Sat. Mat. 50c to 5 5
of collegiate courses are entirely in- "T H E fl I LA "
capable of mastering them, in the l
opinion of Dr. F. J. Kelly, dean of World's Best Laughing Shpw
administration at the University of . With Mr. Mulligan and Mr. Garrity
Minnesota, who recently spoke here t Nights 75c to $1.50
at the initiation banquet of Phi Delta UUII@1W4 Playhoats 50e and 75c
kappa, national honorary educational Woodward at Elhot Tel.Glendale 9792
fraternity. He went on to say that The BONSTELLE CO.
students taking courses in literature I I e mrcncnd
and the arts are wasting their ener- I( . ew Amerie.. C...dy
'ies by enrolling in technical courses " THE WASH UTu"9
which will never benefit them. By FRANK DAZEY
"We should recognize that some!S u tafayette at Shelby
subjects are tools and means °o an fNights,50c to $3
end," lie said. "It is foolish to Brgiursay, best seats $2. Sat. Baain Mat.,
force students to study subjects as Tel. Cadillac 8705
mathematics if they have no inter- 12th WEEK
est in their vocational aspect." The STUDENT PRINCE
Dean Kelly is the author of several The Musical Triumph of a Generatlon
tlooks on pedagogical subjects and has Company of 150
done research work in education in -_--
colleges and secondary , schools {
throughout the country. 'Read the W ant Ads
Alumni To Hear

13-VICTOR RECORD ARTISTS-13
-Screen-
Julian Eltinge - An Pennington

"MADAMi,BEHAVE"

/p _ . ._4

Tapping, Kipke
CLEVELAND, O., Dec. 4.-T. Haw-
ley Tapping, field secretary of the
University of Michigan Alumni asso-
(iation, and Harry Kipke ,assistant
football coach, will be the principal
speakers at the annual meeting of the
association tomorrow at the Hotel
Statler.

III I I I I -w4z!mm

STARTINGi
TOMORROW

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* PAY YUR SUBSCRIPTION

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