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November 18, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-11-18

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FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVmi3EIE 18, 1925

Published every morning except Monday
during the University yeargby the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
cred in this paper and the local news pub-
lishted therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
vicligan, assecond class matter. Special rate
ni postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mastcr General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.0o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
aard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214.
EWITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, ditorial Board.. .Norman R. Thal
City Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
?News Editor-.........Manning Housewortb
W1omien's Editor............ Helen S. Ramnsay
Sports Editor...............Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVorey . Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Oao Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

n

Certrude t. Bailey
Willimn T. Barbour
Charles Behymer
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
L. Buckmugam
Edgar Carter
Carleton Champe.
Eugene T.hGtttkt nt
Douglas Doubleday
Mary Dunnigan
James T. Herald
lizabeth S. Kennedy
M iarion Kubik
Walter II. Mack
Louis R. Markus
Ellis Merry
Helen Morrow

Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Evelyn Pratt
Marie Reed
Simon Rosenbaum
Ruth Rosenthal
Wilton A. Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtlavd C. Smith
Stanley Steinko
Clarissa Tapson
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Chandler 3. Whipple
Cassamn A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilszke

Headed by Count Volpi, the rmn-
mission from Romut combined several
of the more or less marked char-
acteristics of their predecessors. Their
country is poor, this they admitted,
but they wanted to pay. y aying
the cards face up, they made settle-
ment of the debt based on ability to
pay; they wished to drive no bargain.
nor to hide the true conditions of
affairs.
Working from facts, the negotiators
were able to decide upon something
like this: the debt, with accrued l-
terest, of $2,133,000,000, in round
numbers, is to be funded on a 62 v'ear
basis, the annual payments of which.
according to the "standard" terms of
the British agreement, would amount
to about $70,000,000.
With vivid recollections of previous
Senate action on treaties and the like,
we wait to see what they can do to
what appears to be the only possible
debt settlement. The question of ac-
ceptance on the other side causes lit-
tle worry. It is vitally important that
this business of debts be settled, the
sooner the atmosphere is cleared the
better. Unsettled debts offer no little
cause for irritation, besides assisting
the blockade to complete reconsitruc-
tion.
Looked at from this angle, the at-
titude displayed on both sides in pre-
paring this tentative settlnement of
the Italian debt was nothing short of
beautiful-a fine precedent for further
negotiations.
CHICAGO.ON-TI-S'
Bringing the ocean to Chicago, six
tramp steamers have doked at the
Lake Michigan port with cargoes frozei
Europe and South Anerica. Their
success should be an advertisement
of the possibilities of the St. Lawrence
waterway system. Others will follow
these pioneers, but no vessel of more
than 3,000 tons can navigate the Wel-
land canal. The locks on the upper1
St. Lawrence are another barrier toI
large ocean ships. Chicago will never
be a big ocean port until these condi-
tions are remedied.
Ex-Governor Lowden, of Illinnia,
said recently that the Great Lakes
have tributary to them the "greatest
agricultural area on the continent."
He pointed out that almost two-thirds
of the agricultural wealth of the na-
tion is within this area. It produces
75 per cent of all the wheat and 85
per cent of all the iron ore in the
United States. This territory would
be opened to world commerce by mak-
- ng Chicago a world port.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications wi llbe
disregarded.The a alIcs of commno i-
eants Ivill, boxv cve, be regar.!ded as
confidenitmaupon Bet

TWA
F I~i~g songs are very spirited
and certainly serve as a vent for pent
up emotions of the cheering hordes;
but thy don't mean very much in
themselves, we fear Have you ever
stepped to analyze the verses andI
chorus to most. of them. Let us take,
for exalmple

AND
DRAMA
'lilS AFTERVNOON : The It inee
rusicae ithe Michigan Union ball }
room it 3:30 o'clock.
TONIG11T: "Desire under the
Elmns" by Eugene O'Neill in the Shea-
bert-detroit Opera House at 8:15
Ok' olck.
* * *

FIRST ANNUAL

in HILL AUDITORIUM, SATURDAY NIGHT

AFTER DINNER

;.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGED
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising....................J. J. Finn
Advertising..............T. D. Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising..............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising..................Wm. L. Mullin
Circulation...................1. L. Newman
Publication..............Rudolph Bostelina
Accounts..................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Nordquist
George H1. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
WV. Carl Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
3 oi n 11. Bobrink Robert Prentiss
W. J. Cox Wmn. C. Pusch
M arion A. Daniel Franklin J. Rauner
James R. DePuy Joseph Ryan
Margaret L. Funk Margaret Smith
Stan Gilbert Mance Solomon
T. Kenneth Haven Thomas Sunderland
. E. Little Wm. J. Weinmnan
rank E. Mosher
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1925
Night Editor-ROBERT T. DE VORE

tARSTYI
in which the first verse opens with a
request that the male students pro-
gress toward victory. It then statesi
one of the oldest dictums of football,
following which it expresses the Uni-
versitys optimaitie forecast us to the
result of the contest. Then come sev-
eral ejaculations, followed by a plea
for victory for the institution.
The chorus opens with a request
that the first string players advance
toward the goal-posts It then stiates
that they should under no circum-
stances give way in the slightest. The
next line begs them to elevate some
sort of unknown devise, at least in
Iootbal. Following this it requests
thm to parade toward victory for the
Sniversity of Michigan antl two op-
posing colors of the septrum. It
then continues with the statement
that the singers are on the players'
account, in fact, that they are there
to(1 (chr themu.!
It closes with the encouraging
statement that the singers have no
fear for the players; another ejacula-
tion, and the repetition of the slang
for first eleven.
Now on the whole, you must admit
that that is not exactly pregnant witl
deeply emotional or logical meaning.
Still it's a good fighting song.
EFV ATTE - M (111IRST
CLASS AI CHEERS
(F STUI EN'TS8
()cneupieS &As A ssigned To ter in
Each Class !tudents in Ftaar
Ann Arbor, Michigan, Nov. IS, 1925.-
Miss Effie Snorp who is positively
no relation to the laten Dean Zilch, at-
tended her first class (a Polish quiz
section) amid the howls and cheers
of tle caumpus in general. Occupying
three seats in the middle of the front
row, Miss Snorp acconplisihe a total
eclipse of the instruct or. Other co-
eds at the rear of the room were
much agitated, and plan to report this
to the dean. Miss Snorp announced
that she would not try out for te
football team, despite the many let-
fcrs ]'T"!Ivd by her from ost.
"I rmbt Eli1e to marry Harold
:ralnve, but I wont play football my-
sel," she said.
Miss Snorp had her first blind date
m townt1 lst night. The lucky man
called for her in a Ford, ut on meet-
ing her, abandoned the vchicle
promptly. On walking down toward
the iMlaj, Miss Snorp was forced to
inake a detour because of the En-
gineering arch. "Why do they make
th1e streets so narrow here?" she de-
ma adcd. To which her complan ion
-iv a.foced to admit "that the ini-
,ersity was not designed to accommno-
dat e persons of her caliber."'
Further discourses upon Ann
Arbor's tiniest co-ed will follow
as soon as the three hundred and
fifty nine found Venus acclima-
tizes herself.
* * *
Lull ElitiS
Two teams had a had football hug
Uach year they fought for a jug

"iiESIJIE UNDIER TUE ELMS"
A review by Kenneth Wickware.
"When ye kin make corn sprout out
o' stones, God's livin' in yew. They
wa'n't strong enuf fur that! They
reckoned God was easy. - They laugh-
ed. They don't laugh no more. Some
died hereabouts. Some went West an'
died. They're all under ground-fur
follerin' arter an easy God. God
hain't easy."
In the small, meanly furnished bed-
room of a New England farmhouse.
Ephraim Cabot thus recounts na part
of the story of his early struggles-to
his newest wife, Abbie Putman, whom
he has married because "a hum's got
t' hev a woman. .. It was lonesome
too long. I was growin' old in the
spring-growin' ripe on the bough."
He pictures for her the bitterness and
the unceasing toil of his first years
of combat with the stubborn forces of
nature, the stones without number
which he has "hefted" from the al-
most sterile fields to make fences, how
the three sons, Simeon, Peter, and
Elben have slaved their very souls out,
"plowin', hayin', weedin', milkin','
learning to hate their father for his
relentlessness; how two wives have
already died-"though they were good
workers, and meant well enough." But
they were without understanding, and
Ephraim has never found solace for
his lonesomeness.
"She died," he says. "After that it
wa'n't so lonesome fur a spell. I lost
count o' t e years. I had no time to
fool away countin' 'em. Sim an
Peter helped. The farm growed. It
was all mine! When I thought o' that
I didn't feel lonesome."
And so he runs on-monotonously-
in his harsh, grim voice, putting sim-
ple words together laboriously, as if
he were building one of his stone
fences. But Abbie does not listen to
what he says; she is thinking of Eben,
on the other side of the partition, the
"dead spitin' image" of old Ephraim,
but "soft, just like his Maw." Eben
is thinking of Abbie; the faint sound
of her voice coming through the wall
makes him half rise from bed, his
arms outstretched, nu ti, at the mem-
ory of his hatred for her, lie shrinks
back with a curse. At their meeting
in front of the house one day, Abbie
has said, "Ye can't. lt s agin nature,
Eben. Ye been fightin' yer nature ever
since the day I come-tryin' t' tell
yerself I hain't purty to ye."
At the last, Eben and Abbie are
taken away by the sheriff, to answer
to the law for the murder of their
baby, a son, who, in Abbie's first
greed, was to win the farm for her-
fearlessly, protesting their love for
each other. Simeon and Peter, the
older sons, have long run off to the
gold fields in Californi-a. Old Ephraim
is alone.
"Purty good fur yew," lhe says, when
Ebl)en declares his intention of sharing
Abbie's guilt, "Waal, I got t' round
up the stock. Good-by."
* * *
The Shubert-Detroit opera house
held a frankly puzzled audience Mon-
day evening-an audience which
hardly knew whether to frown or

3 OCD

' . :

(Space donated by Graham's)
coc~ocooc

Ord.

MAKE TSELL
N[A s c?
HATS CLEANED AN)D
BLOCKED-1UHT
NEW hATS--TUE BEST
Save a Dollar or More at the
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 715.
(Where D. U1. R. Stops at State St.)
Irving -,arinohsD S
OIITIIOPEDIST
707 N. University Ave. Phone 21212

TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT
You get the date and we'll furnish the rest. The
dance only lasts from 8-10, so there will be plenty
of time to study either before or after.
Tickets at
SLATER'S BOOK SHOP, or at -
GOODYEAR DRUG CO., Main St.
e.
; 7 M.- (-;-
lip,
-> -

THEODORE HARRISON directs
"THE FINEST" Michigan Glee Club
in the

j
1~

"Homecoming" Concert

P LE ASE
MAKE
PATH S
ON THE
CAPU

r

BEFORE THE DANCE

t.. 1
, 1i

.wAft

TILE LAST CHANCE
The Interfraternity council ha;
agaLin "acted" on the question of fra-
ternity dances, this time with credit
able effect. The plan adopted, whil(
perhaps not as satisfactory as ii
nmight be, is at lerast something defi
nite and tangible, and can be made
into a real, workable pact,-if it re-
ceives the proper support from the
members of the body that passed it-
tlie respective fraternities and the
mermbers thereof.
Conditions are nothing short of dis-
gusting when such a resolution be-
comes necessary, when men who arc
supposed to be in training for the
future leadership of the world must
be forced to act like rational, re-
spectable beings. There is no word
that will adequately describe the sit-
nation if this plan, adopted by the
representative body of the fraternity
group on the campus, is not supported
by the various houses.
The council has not provided any
intricate system of policing to enforce
this latest rule, and good, common
sense should repel any such sugges-
tion. Yet if the motion passed and
accepted by the council in regard to
fraterity parties is not given the
nctual support -that it deserves, some
method of patrolling the parties will
have to be found and adopted.
The Uiversity and the individuals
who mtk-o t up cannot afford to allow
week-cid booze parties at any recog-
nized house on or in any way con-
rccted Yitli the campus. The fratern-
ities have been given an opportunity
to eradicate them themselves, and
have outwardly accepted. If the plan
mldopted does not meet with immediate
success, the fraternities will have no
grounds for objection if all semblance
of self-gbvernment is taken away
from terim.
AWI PLOIIFATSr-ANi) GENTLEMEN
Another step has been taken toward
the disVtanglemnent of the muddle
churned by ihe late World war, that
awful catastrophe that turned all-
the hearts and souls of men even-
topsy tuivy in its smashing, fiery
grasp. A week or so- ago the Italian
-)ebt commission went to work over
the problem of Italy's indebtedness to
this counb'y, in a surprising manner
-in a manner, at least, different from
the other major debtors who havel
come to Washington.
The poor, diminutive Frenchman
came with nothing, to offer other than
Ii ~~i'; I1"Dnli11 nuR" 21n o f wi~l - 1

s
it
i-
e'

WHERE WEALTH ACCU7fLATES
(Boston Evening Transcript)
Bishop Thirkield, of the ]\ethodist
Episcopal Church, expressed, at a.
meeting of the board of bishops otr
that church in Buffalo, the other day,
the opinion that America is "traveling
the path along which Route staggered
to her doom." Our country, he said,
is "beastly rich," andl our weal,!t
everywhere engenders such "softness,
luxury, lawlessness and coirulption"
as will surely ruin us, unless we
arouse a keener degree of religious
impulse and forget our craze to make
money. Is the right reverend bishop
quite warranted in his gloomy fore-
bodings? Is wealth the sole cause of
our crime wave?" Bishop Thirkield's
position entitles him to a respectful
consideration of his main charge. Bu1
is our country's great wealth driving1
it to the devil? Somehowv the present
course of American life does not ap-
pear to prove that. Ia a general
way, to be sure, abounding wealt
conduces to evil doing. Where riches
abound, tenmptation allounds. (:a
wealth leads to ostentation, to glittei-'

The Style and
Quality of our
Service is what
Attracts the
Crowds
to
1-ARMONYT
CAFETER IA
548 East Wilamt
"Where the Best Food
Is Served"

'The Sound 'Basis
for S uccess
in the Bond Business
ANYcollege men are influenced to choose
the bond business for a career because they
count on a ready-made clientele among wealthy
friends. That is a weak basis upon which to
make so important a decision. Experience will
disillusion them.
A man must know his business to succeed in the
bond business, as in any other. Men of wealth
are good enough business men to demand
competent service in return for their invest-
ment patronage. The man who is, first, qualified
for the bond business-then well trained and
well-informed, will find that his progress is
little dependent upon friendship.
College men who obtain employment with
Halsey, Stuart& Co. are immediatelygiven prac-
tical training in the fundamentals of the busi-
ness before they are assigned to actual work.
Thus they begin with a good foundationwhich,
together with accumulation of experience, de-
velops ability-the only sound basis for success.
IN
We have prepared a paper which gives much informa-
tion about the bond business, of pertinent interest
to those who might be considering it as a career.
We shall be glad to send you a copy upon request.
Write for pamphlet MD-Y

The Wolverines espoused it laugh or snicker at O'Neill's frank ut-
.T'hey promptly Field-housed it terances. Indeed, "Desire Under the
Now it's snug as a bug in a rug. iElms" is quite astonishing to the
* * . Iordinary play-goer, used to the usual
The TI and G wiar and the Minnie smirking manner of many playwrights

H A LSEY, STU A RT & Co.
INCORPOR ATED
CHICAGO NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA DETROIT CLEVELAND
aoi South LaSalle St. 14 WaIl St. tI South 15th St. 6oi Griswold St. 925 Euclid Ave.
ST. LOUIS BOSTON MILWAUKEE MINNEAPOLIS
3r9 North 4th St. 82 Devonshire St. 415 East Water St. 61o Second Ave.,S.

ing pretense; these Ic en vy and -Zilch divorce case are so hopelessly ( in cloaking unpleasant things. There
I cupidity; and out of envy and cupidity i n omisnmled at present that it seens im- is no beating about the bush here,
many crimes are born. p 'ssible to make any statement. no provocation for the exercise of
Nevertheless the reckoning is by no * * * morbid imagination. Speeches are
means all on that side of the account. We expect to see the Gargoyle full made frankly, with the directness
Never, in any previous state of society of hospital jokes next issue. common to similar situation in actual
in the world, has wealth wrought so * * * life.
much good as in this country and iln The old problem of good vs. evil Strikingly simple in theme, the play,
our time. A vast proportion of the arose to worry us last night. What under O'Neill's genius, becomes a
earnings of American wealth i r-- wiith the Masques and Clarence Dar- vehicle of terrific power. There is no
turned to the people whose labor pro- row, we had a. terrific moral battle. fine language; every word spoken
duced it in universally beneficial in- I....So we compromised and went to moves the action forward. Such
stitutions and influences- in schools, the Arc. bursts of passion as are appargnt are
libraries, museums, sanitation, whole - * * * merely glimpses of the intensest emo-
some recreation, imnstrunientalitios of We exect that the entire Ann Ar- tions, seen for a moment through the
culture, and foundations for research borpolice force went to hill audi- I mask of stern repression. The action
upon which great social reforms, may torium last niglit. moves evenly, with a hardness that is
be based. These powerful saving * * * almost brittle, slowly storing up an
tendencies, operating as a check upon God, how we love them! emotional stress of apalling magni-
evil in every form, are set in motion Sir Toby Tiffin. tude, which at last finds a temporary
by the direct gift of wealth. More- outlet for both actors and audience
{ over, not all people Of wealth, notI mle:[us. If we are the richest Nation, in the final crisis-but only for a
even a considerablle minority of them,- we are so on the whole the happiest. brief respite. The ruthless suppres-
are engaged in - so flaunting thei' Present conditions", especially with re- sion of feeling is recaptured immedi-
riches as to'excite envy or stimilate gard to the enforcement of law and ately, and even )after the final curtain
crime. What labout the well-to-do the restraint of crime, are not satis- we are conscious of the continuancei
who are daily examples to their fellow ifactory, and we cannot blame the men of a bitter struggle.
citizen? What about men of wealth of religion for demnanding their One senses in witnessing the per-
who expend their income or discovery, amndmne1t. ulat we think that formance of thL play that here, if
in the achievement of sc-ince withm isop 'lirkield exaggerates a little. ever, we have true American genius---
learning? Emerson said1 wisely that t is to le" loibted whether it is right an art that is as universal as it is
the rich man who animates his pos- Ior proper to lay the whole blame for typical, that has a restraint which de-
sessions by his quality land energy thm "criie wave" on the shoulders of pends upon no one state or city for.
. ~~fP nnt -rfnr h .tC ,)n. 9 iensupn o nesat oct

pwooova

%.f./ '.I. . .0"1.0"./ «P~. °,r" I,.v". . I"rP.I". .sra yd ";

FARMERS AND MECHANICS
101-105 S. MAIN ST.--ANN ARBOR, MICH.-33C

YOU'LL, FIND OUR OFFICERS READY WITH
FRIENDLY ADVICE ON FINANCIAL MATTERS,
FOR ALL WHO SEEK THEIR COUNSEL. THEIR
YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN SUCH MATTERS
MAY MAKE THEIR OPINIONS OF VALUE.
THEY'LL BE GLAD TO TALK TO YOU.

74
BANK

11

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