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November 18, 1925 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-11-18

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PAGE l _ .w

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMB~ER .191~25

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Methodist Foreign Mi
TRA NSPORTATION OFWho Figured In
CITY I IN DANGER
Operation Expenses For Eight Months r
Show $40,402.41 Los; (ounel
To Investigate Question
SUGGESTBUSRE-ROUTING t
Records reveal that the Peoples' . ~
Motor Coach company have operated
at a loss of $40,402.31 during the first
eight months of their operation, a sit- !
nation which threatens to leave Ann
Arbor without transportation, unless
conditions are changed, it was learn-
ed by the City council Mocnday even-
ing.
The report given the council cov-
ered the period from Feb. 1 to Sept. s
30, 1925, and showed the total revenueY
for the eight months to be $75,338.08,
twith operating costs of $93,424.42, re-
4ulting in a net loss of $18,086.36. The
remainder of the deficit of $40,402.31
was accounted for in taxes and de- j Ei)GAR 8EA4E
preciation.
T. P. Pinckard, president of the
company, told the councilmen that .
there was little hope'of ever puttingr
the bus line on a paying basis, or
even operating it without a loss with
the present equ ii-nt. A small say~-
Xng might be cfV Itd through the re-r
'outing of the pre.ent line and a re-
%lsion in the tariff rates, and it .wasf
for aid in accomplishing these changes
that the company appealed to the.
councilt I
After much discussion, during
which time many questions were ask-
'd Mr. Pinckard concerning the op-
eration of motor buses, it was the r
general opinion that the only satis-~
factory method of avoiding the deficitz
was to reduce the operating costs by
a change to a lighter type vehicle.
It was proposed by Mayor Robert A.
Campbell that such a change be made
as the present 36 passenger bus was
liot any better adapted to the needsA
of the city than a smaller one. Mr. ral resi o--A-
Pinckard, in answering his suggestionl, Ventl'l Press Prto
declared that his company already Distinguished religious leaders fr
had made an investment in the large ware, o., for the annual meeting of th
rype bus, and could not easily replace Methodist Episcopal church which end
these at the present time with the
lighter style. The proposed change Gle C W 0
would only amount in a saving of five G eo o
cents per mile or a total of $1,900 aT'
month, while the loss now sustained Serenade Tonight
is $5,000 a month. A deficit of $3,100 4
would still remain, and Mr. Pinckard As a prelude to the homecoming
intimated that his company could not concert which it will present Satur-
long remain in the city operating at day night, the Varsity Glee club will
such a loss. serenade the sororities and women's
Tariff revisioi formed the subject dormitories on the campus tonight.
bf another lengthy discussion, and
was proposed as another possible so- Cotrar to the custom ofthe
lution of the problem. The sale ofI spring serenades, the club will not
lutin o theprolem Thesal ofstop at the houses for refreshments
three tickets for 25 cents has not ac-mso rat he houses shn ts
complished the purpose for which it i n order that all the organizations
was originally issued, it was stated. may be reached. It has also beentde-
Three passengers enter the coach at cded by the Glee lubmanagement
once thereby securing advantage of the that the two numbers which will be
reduced rate, while the primary pur- given at each house will be Michigan
pose was to sell these tickets that they songs, rather than the popular pieces
might be used by a single person' given in the spring serenade.t t
only, inducing him to ride more fre- about the campus at 7:15 o'clock at
quently. The proposed change provid-
ed for the elimination of these tickets, the Union. The club will also sing
replacing them with six for 50 cents, before the President's house on the
and likewise abolishing the 50-ride campus and on the steps of the Li- 1
coupon books with weekly passes to brary.
be sold at $1.25.
The entire matter was refered to his company had continually used ev-
the railway committee, who will re- ery effort to render the best trans-
port at a meeting Nov. 23. The pro- portation service possible and at the
posals for re-routing and the changes lowest cost, and now they do not ask
in tariff will be considered by the for reimbursement, but merely an op-
council at that time. ,portunity to break even on their in-
Mr. Pinckard told the council that vestment.

fssion Leaders
Recent Ohio Meeting

ADTMIT CADETS TO
UNIVES ITY G9RO0U"P
Assoclation of American unlversities
Approves Membership Of U. S. 4
MIilitary Academy
AIDS RHODES SCHOLARS
At the recent annual meeting of the
Association of American universities
in New Haven, the admission of the
United States Military academy to
membership under the class of tech-
nological institutions was formally
approved. This approval was voted
after careful investigation by a repre-
sentative of the -association, had es-
tablished satisfactorily the breadth of
the curriculum and the high collegi-
ate standards maintained in the ed-
ucational training at West Point.
The immediate effect of the military
academy's membership in the associa-
tion will be to give to any of its grad-
uates who may be selected as Rhodes
scholars a regular senior standing
when they report at Oxford. The As-
sociation of American universities is
recognized by the authorties of the
!English universities as the premier j
body accrediting the best institutions1
[of collegiate grade in this country.
Students who are graduates of insti-
tutions that are on the list of accred-
ited universities, colleges, and tech-
nical schools published by the asso-
ciation, are granted senior standing
without question, and are allowed to
elect individual courses adapted to
their own desires, and to do graduate
work -for honors.
Three recent graduates of the mil-
itary academy were selected as Rhodes
scholars, and are -now enrolled as
resident students at Oxford.
BRUSSELS.-A bill calling for rati-
fication of the Belgian-American debt
settlement negotiated at Washington,
was introduced in the Belgian Parlia-
ment today.
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW.

Lea

ds Opposition -' BOOK 'II L Yi t U I R R,
T o P a in le v e R u le A YsN N d Press)
TRATSANALSIS STIKERS JSIIC
1B A 0sociae Press)

raecfillan Pullishles Vylnume By Iean
Of iuslness A dninistration
School
TO GO ON SALE SOON
"Statistical Analysis" is the title of
a book recently written by. Dean )Fd-
mund E. Day of the School of Busi-
ness Administration. This book wasj
published yesterday by the MacMillan
company of New York, and will soon
be placed on sale in State street book-
stores.
Furnishing the beginning student
with a, general and comprehensive in-1
troduction to statistical methed, this
book places greatest emphasis upon
analysis, rather than the collection
and tabulation of statistical material,
I because it is the former which Dean
Day, in writing his book, considered
most important for the beginner.
The book is not intended to cover
the technicalities of mathematical
statistics, though mathematical pro-
cesses essential to elementary analys-1
is are carefully explained. Dean Day

PHILAIiLHF'IA .Pa., Nov. 18.-The-
Rev. J. J. Curran of Wilkesbarre, who
has ben trying to bring about an
(.n1d to ie anthracite strike, told the
members of the city business club
today that the miners should receive
a wage increase and that they will
I not go back to work until they do.
"The operators claim that miners
have the strike habit," said Father
Curran. ."Well, remember that
Charles M. Schwab, Judge Gary, and
United States government reports
! have been telling the country that we
' are prospering, that industrial life is
growing.
I "if by co-operation of the operators
and employees more money can be
made, why not divide between the
l operator and the employee? If the
coal companies make more money
!than ever this year why -nbt divide a
little of the profits with these men
who are instrumental in making the
profit for the employer?"
JACKSON.--In session at St. Luke's
Methodist Fpiscopal church in this

Leon Blum, leader of French social-
ist party, is continuing the attacks
which forced Paul Painleve to disband
one cabinet and form another.
LITTLE REPRESENTS MICHIGAN
AT STATE UNIVERSITY MEETIN f
President Clarence Cook Little was
in Chicago yesterday and Monday re-
presenting the University at a meet-
ing of the National Association of
State universities. He will return to
Ann Arbor today.

gave particular attention to the na- city aie 4 :p Ptors of the Albln dis-
ture of the unit, the variable, and the trict of the Afethodist church. The
other fundamental elements- vwith conference will end Wednesday.
which statistics has to deal.
w With a total of 459 pages, 124 tables JACKSON.- The city commission
and 84 charts, the book contains an has begun work on the 1924 budget.
abundance of illustrative material The. estimated expenditures for that
which has been drawn from the fields year total $1,223,821, which calls for
of economics and business. a tax rate of $9.75.
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW. IPAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW.

,

c 3 # L. NLELS N
om many lands gathered at Dela-
e board of foreign missions of the
s today.

An Array of Talent

Presented in the "Homecoming" Concert

,SATURDAY NIGHT
by Eh E
MICHIGAN GLEE CLUB

Variety-Entertainment-Fun

r r
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S -
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- y
- You see them - on State
St., on South U. - every-
- where on the campus.
Teir shirts are white-a
real white-and they are
M y
comfortable. They send
_ r
their laundry to the Var-
sity. You too should try
- _
tsservice.=
- r
ber -
Yo Phte429 -
. y
BERTY AT FIFTH
S n South U. --- every-
wher onthe campus

It's a Nifty Treat

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An ever-changing variety of foefo,
acomplete absence of any menu-
monotony that's one reason why
so many Arcade patrons eat here
regularly-and always enjoy it

A rcade

Cafeteria

Up-stairs, Nickels Arcade

ANN ARBOR DRAPERY SHOPPE

301 East Liberty Street

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The English Grille and Blue Room
Feature a *1,25 Luncheon

Call 3031 for

4

I Shades, Draperies and Accessories

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ESERVED for men at the noon hour, the
English Grille combines the free and easy
atmosphere of a club with the hospitable
spirit of an old English Inn.
Here and in the charming Blue Room, a special '1.25
luncheon is served from 12 to 3 p.m. daily (except Sun-
day). Dinner De Luxe served nightly in both English
Grlle and Blue Room from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Price, X2.00
Dinner Dance in Blue Room every evening, except Sunday from 7:00
p.gm. to 1:00 a.m. Music by Book-Cadillac Dance Orchestra
L fVk±1

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