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November 17, 1925 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-11-17

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?"AGE YOURt

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F1USDAY, NOVEMBER 13, i9'

......wa ... a a v sss..ra. a.au s s } er.I: v':.

I

PucblishedA every morning except Monday
dur.ingheUiversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications,
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
ThIles sociated Press is exclusively en-
til"'! to the use for republication of all news
dispatches crelited to it or not otherwise
,, tcrdedin this paper and the local news pub-
..d therein<.
! ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
o r postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
nacrGeneral.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
( es: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
ard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
C.a , a Edtorial Board. .,Norman R. Thal
r ..J'ud ,.........Robert S. Mansfield
New Edt.......... Manning Ilouseworth
W e 'ditor...........Helen S. Ramsay
prts E ditor................. Joseph Kruger
'1 legraph Editor.......... William Walthour
sic and Drama. Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
T. Cady Lecnard C. Hall
Willaird hl. Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick II. Shillito
Assistants

quota of 1,400 new and active life
nmembers.
Jecently there has been good (1( l A
of comment on the statement thatyD
about one-half of the people who at- I.1 I
tend symphony concerts, art exhibits, ItFirst of all, be it clearly understo
lectures, and similar programs, o so that we are among the most enthusi
only because it is being done by the astic admirers of the lady's art. He
best people and not because they ex- performance Saturday night was a
perienco any enjoyment or apprecia~ fine in every respect as any wO hiav
tion of art themselves. To some it witnessed since our arrival in An:
might seem a situation deserving Arbor, which is about as much as on
critical damnation, but to many it ap- can say.
pears a state of improving public Now-, kind seekers after mirth
taste, meriting some optimism for the listen to this, which was sent us witl
future. the cryptic remark: "For Heaven'
It has been but a few years since sake can't something be done abou
men and women found it necessary this."
to utilize practically all their time in THE WORLD'S FUNNIEST
earning a living. So we certainly W TRVIEW
cannot expect cultured citizens to ThTERVIEW
developd in so short a time. The fact The entire masterpiece is too lon
that it is considered necessary to be to print, but read this:
aware of the latest artistic ahieve_ "Ach!" she exclaimed relapsing
ments and progress is certainly ade- into German in her enthusiasm,
quate evidence of improved taste, an "you couldn't trade me all of
obvious development from the era of' Europe for America. God, how I
conch shells, postcard albums, and love it."
horsehair sofas.
At least one may feel optimistic "She pointed with pride to two
over the progress that has actually rows of even firm teeth-her own.
been made. Perhaps in due time we And then she gave me her real
shall have more truly cultured, toler- beauty and health secret."
ant communities throughout the
length and breadth of the country "She simply showers love on
where appreciation of the beautiful these soldiers with all the passion
will receive its due,-and art, a niod- and intensity of her being. Never
est place in the hearts of the Bab- have I heard simple words uttered
bitts, with such emotion as her: 'God,

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MUSIC 1
AN
Asolutely "The
D RAMA
TONIGHT: Masques present "The 1hem. *
Cradle Song" by Martinez Sierra in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall at 8:30
o'clock. And 'Y ou W ill J
'TONIGHT: "Desire Under theAo W
Elms" by Eugene O'Neill in Shubert- .1
Detroit Opera House at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *

_ ; ,

Finest"

Saturday Night

Agree

(Space donated by Graham's)

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G;ertrude E. Bailey
a T. Barbour
ihrles Behymer
V'liam IDreyer
Philip C. Brooks"
I . ckinghan
r Carter
t'udItinCliampe
Eugenre H. Gutekunst
De glas Doubleday
Mary Dunnigan
(j~mes T. Herald
11iaebS. Kennedy
M arion Kubik
Walter H. Mack
oi R. Markus
Ellis Merry
helen Morrow

Margaret Parker
Stan ford N.tPhelps
Evelyn Pratt
Marie Reed
Simon Rosenbaum
Ruth Rosenthal
Wilton A. Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtlaril C. Smith
Stanley Steinko
Clarissa Tapson
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Chandler J. Whipple
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilszke

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of conmuni-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

How I adore them.'

"And so I left my
lady, the mother with
and soul of an angel."
* * *

Madonna
the voice

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGEF
BYRON W. PARKER
Adverting......................J. J. Finn
Advertising .............T. D. Olmsted, Jr.!
Advertising.............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising....... .....Win.L.LMullin
Circulation ..................I. L. Newman
P'ublication...............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts..................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Nordquist
'George 11. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Car. Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
mhn 1. Bobrink hobert Prentiss
V. J. Cox Win, C. Pusch
Marion A. Daniel Franklin J. Rauner
7zanes R. DePuy Joseph Ryan
largaret L. Funk Margaret Smith
Stan Gilbert Maiie Solomon
T. Kenneth Haven Thomas Sunderland
J. E.' Little Wm. J. Weinman
Trank E. Mosher
- V
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1925
! . Night Editor-S TH IfH. CADY, JR.
THE DRIVE OPENS
Organizations the size of the Mich-
igan Union, operating a building as
pretentiohs at its home on State
street, covering an extensive program
in varied fields of student activity,
cannot operate without funds. In or-
der to obtain the necessary money,
the Union annually conducts a life
membership drive, giving, in return
for the money it receives countless
privileges after graduation to the
purchaser.
Today 40 teams, composed of more
than 100 students, will open a three
day campaign to obtain 1,400 new
life members of the Union. They will
sacrifice prjacticaLy all their time
outside the classroom during that
period for the good of the Union.
They receive no pay; they are given
no commission on the memberships
they sell. Their reward is slight in
comparison with the effort it is neces-
sary to put forth if the desired .quota
is to be reached. They are all stu-
dents of the University and not paid
solcitors of the book agent variety,
and consequently are deserving of
every consideration that the campus
can show them during the drive.-
A life membership in the Union is
not a gift to that organization; it is a
sound business proposition. It will
bring rich returns in the years after
the purchaser graduates from the
University, It means first choice of a
room at the Union when the life mem-
ber returns to Ann Arbor. It means
the use of the building during football
week-ends when that privilege, ac-
corded to the undergraduate student
freely, is revoked. It means better
seats at the Union opera when it plays
in the home town of the life member
during the Christmas vacation of
future years. It gives the purchaser
the right to wear the maize and blue
"M" pin that denotes the Union and
inarks him as a Michigan man wher-
ever he may be. A life membership
is not a charitable donation andi
should not be considered as such. 1
Put even disregarding the advan-
tages of the future, the student is at1
present enjoying the privileges of the
Union free of charge, except for ai
slight sum added to his tuition. Is1
not the use of the Union building, the
possession of a beautiful Universityc
home in which to study, read, swim,
play pool, billiards, or partake inI
other recreation worth anything?

A CONSTRUCTIVE SUGGESTION
To the Editor:
Of the many original ideas tha
President Little has thrown out it
his public addresses, one of the mos
valuable and pertinent has thus far
been overlooked or at any rate ha
not received the attention it deserves
I refer to his suggestion that the
money taken in at football games be
divided between athletics and re
search. That such a division of the
spoils would instantly bring about a
new alignment of interests on the
campus is apparent to anyone who
has studied the present situatio
carefully. The chief argument, for
example, against the enlargement o
the stadium is that it would thius
still further into the background th
already diminished interest in pure
science and research; but if for every
dollar that went into the athletic
treasury a dollar went into the budget
of the Graduate School, this argument
would lose its validity. Athletics am
research would find themselves un-
expectedly joining hands,. and every
move to enhance the prosperity of on
would automatically enhance thc
prosperity of the other. Athletics
would thus become a contributor t
the highest of educational interests
and a stadium that would seat not
only all students, faculty, and alumni,
but the entire population of Ann Ar-
bor as well, would appeal to high-
brows and lowbrows alike.
The simplicity of the plan is a
strong point in its favor. It requires-
no additional office furniture, no re-
organization, no new /method of
bookkeeping. All that is necessary
is for the Athletic association to di-
vide equally all gate receipts, the di-
vision to be postponed, of course,
until the new stadium is completed
and the increased income assured.
Can we not drop this fruitless, em-
bittering quarrel over squatters'
rights and begin to think of te en-
larged stadium in terms of physical
and intellectual profit-sharing? I
would suggest that the proper start-
ing point for such a movement is the
University Research club-potentially
one of the most powerful and influen-
tial organizations on the campus,
though at present, I imagine, not a
household word with the rooters or
even the members of the team.
-Alumnus.
WORDS-TO WHAT AVAIL
What amazing lack of appreciation
prevails upon our intellectualistic
campus! In vain have I waited for
someone to write of the bouquets of
rare and colorful flowers, from the
hot-houses of rhetoric, which one may
gather at leisure from the musical
and dramatic criticisms in The Daily.
It is an intensely fascinating pastime,
plucking by their frail stems these
iridescent hybrids and monsters of
the horticulturists of rhetoric. What
irrepressible cries of delight they in-
cite. Surely only a stolid soul could
remain cold before Mr. Henderson's
'review' of Madame Schumann-Heink
in Sunday's Daily; beyond cavil, a
flower rarer than the selenicerius and
more redolent than blooming sweet-
clover.
It is such effervescent rapture that
I write this pale and mute encomium.
Madame Schumann-Heink herself was

EFFIE SNORP ARRIVES TO TAKE
UP STUDIES hERE. .IS NO
RELATION TO ZILCH
Tiny 37 Pound Maid, Fresh From
Old Homestead Says Michigan
Is Swell
Ann Arbor, Mich., Nov. 34, 1925.-
Miss Effie Snorp, of Cirle Center,
Michigan, has finally matriculated as
a freshman woman after twenty years
of diligent effort. Miss Snorp will
take up her residence in the tower
room of Newberry hall, formerly used
as a class room, now as a supposed
object d'art.
"I certainly do," said Miss Snorp,
when asked a question. She also be-
lieves that women should be allowed
t to smoke all they want.
"The men do, and they seem to sur-
vive in large numbers on this camp-
us," she is quoted as saying, "So I
don't see why the girls shouldn't."
It was agreed that should the girls
smoke freely on this campus, they
would probably increase in number,
but it was pointed out that was not
the primary purpose of the authori-
ties here.
"Then what is?" she asked, silence
all further discussion.
Miss Snorp, in spite of the fact that
she weighs 357 pounds is very modest
about her achievements. She pointed
out that since her childhood she had
always wanted to do big things.
"Now I seem to do them every
time I walk" she concluded. She
would make no further statements.
* * *
Al says: "After all the time Ohio
took to talk things over, Saturday it is
plain why they call it the Confer-
ence."
* * *
JUSTICE
In the name of Dean Joseph Zilch's
memory, we hereby register a com-
plaint against the producers of a cer-
tain movie now being shown at a lo-
cal theater.
In the course of the film one of the
characters shows another a clipping
from a newspaper in which a man is
arraigned for beating his wife. The
lead of the story says "Mrs. Minnie
Zilch, of 123 Mott Avenue, brought
charges before Justice Schnieflimle.."
Mrs. Zilch, of course, is all worked
up about the situation, and says she
is going to sue the company. Dean
Zilch, she says, could not have possi-
bly beaten his wife, or otherwise mis-
treated her, for she had received a
legal divorce from him in 1902 on the
grounds of nonsupport and has been
married about three times since.
It is grossly unjust, we believe, to
say such things about the dead, par-
ticularly when they cannot defend
themselves. It is, it must be, obvious
to our readers that Joe could not have
done such things, even though he
probably wanted to many times be-
fore the divorce.
We think that the least the motion
picture people can do is to apologize,
publicly and formal for this slander,
which certainly has no shred of truth
in it.

THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review, by Robert Ramsay.
The University Symphony orches-
tra, under the direction of Samuel'
Lockwood, and Albert Lockwood,
pianist of the School of Music com-
bined in the second of the Faculty
series of Sunday afternoon concerts.
The appearance of Mr. Lockwood at
the piano, while always interesting,
was doubly significant in that it
marks his firstsappearance here since
his return from Europe where he
studied and concertized extensively.
His playing is marked by a clarity
of tone and virility of expression that
is eminently satisfactory. Yesterday
he played a Concerto in F Major by
Henselt with the orchestra. His play-
ing was obscured by an over insistent
accompaniment, the inevitable conse-
quence of playing with an amateur
I orchestra, but even that could not
mar . the pleasure derived from Mr.
Lockwood's work which was charac.
terized as always by a scholarly, yet
musicianly approach. Scholar enough
not to lose himself in maudlin senti-
ment, musician enough not to lose
sight of his first obligation-music,
technician enough to please the most
?xacting, and artist enough to allow
his own fine work to be blended into
the less perfect accompaniment, Mr.
Lockwood was more satisfactory than
at any other time that we have heard
him-except once when he played
with Mrs. Okleburg, a Stravinsky
number which seemed to us to ap-
proach anything that more famous
persons could do.
The orchestra is far better this year
than it has been for a long time. Its
weakest spot has always been in the
wind department, a difficulty easy to
understand but not so easy to over-
look. This year that difficulty, while
not obviated has been largely over-
come and the orchestra presents a
really fine ensemble under the intel-
ligent direction of Mr. Samuel Lock-
wood.
* * *
MIMES
All men interested in trying out for
Mimes activities during the remainder
of the year are requested to register
at the Mimes theater tomorrow and
Thursday afternoon from 4:00 to 5:30
o'clock. Those trained in scenic and
costume design, as well as acting, are
also asked to leave their names with
the committee.
The productions following the tour
of the Opera-and it is less than three
weeks, by the way, before "Tam-
bourine" opens at the Whitney thea-
ter-will include an all-campus vau-
deville tournament, the first perform-
ance in America of Lovberg's "Beg-
garman," translated by Prof. O. J.
Campbell of the English department
from the Danish, Eugene O'Neill's
cycle of sea-plays, "S. S. Glencairn,"
repetition of W. S. Gilbert's "Engag-
ed," and an intimate revue patterned
after "The Grand Street Follies."
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Owing to the absence of Palmer
Christian from the city on a concert
tour there will be no Organ Recital
tomorrow afternoon in Hill auditori-
um. The next concert will be given
Wednesday, November 25.
* * u
COMEDY CLUB
At its meeting in University hall
yesterday afternoon the members of
Comedy Club decided, due to lack of
sufficient time, to postpone the pro-
duction of Colin Campbell Clements'
"The Beginner" unit a later date, and
to substitute as the annual January
program George Bernard Shaw's
famuos farce, "The Great Catherine."
The play will be under the direction
of Phyllis Loughton, and will be pre-
sented January 12 and 13 in the

Mimes theater. This change has been
made because of the inadequate stage
and 'auditorium in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, where the programs 4have
always been given in the past.
The cast will include Marguerite
Goodman, Mary Lou Miller, Lilliin
Bronson and Thomas Denton, with
Robert Henderson in the part of
Patiomkin, the prime minister.
The annual tryouts for Comedy
Club were also set for Friday after-
noon, November 20, in the auditorium
of !Newberry hall at 2:00 o'clock.
* * *
.MEMO
Masques are presenting the third
performance of "The Cradle Song" in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall this even-

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~ * * *
We hate to take up your valuable
time- being serious about such mat-
ters, but we do feel that justice must
be done, at any cost.
* * *
Tonight Masques will present "Con-

I

Speak on
CR E9 ITS CA USE
AND TRATMN

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