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October 06, 1925 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGlE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1925

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-MIK

YOST GROOMS TEAM'
FOR" INDIANA GAM
Sqad Peiab Peiinted for Game Wh '
(oaeli tIll t& 4 B ladgers
At Wisconsin
BROWN BACK AT CENTER
With 'the Michigan State contest
now a matter of history, Coach Yost
is grooming his Varsity eleven for
the first Big Ten encount er with In-
diana university Saturday.
Although preparing for Indiana,
Coach Yost is actually pointing his
men for the important clash with
Wisconsin at Madison a week from
Saturday. Th'e contest with the
Badgers will go a long way in deter-
mining Michigan's real strength in
Conference competition, as Coach
George Littlehas developed a strong
eleven that should finish close to the
top this year.
Coach Yost ordered a light program
for all the regulars who participated
in Saturday's contest, sending them
through a kicking and passing drill
during the early part of the afternoon,
and a signal drill during the latter
part.
Captain Bob Brown was back at his
customary place at center on the first
team with Edwards and Lovette at
the guards, Hawkins and Oade at the
tackles, and Flora and Osterbaan on
the flanks. Friedman ran the team,
with Gilbert and Gregory at the
halves and Molenda at full.
Coach Yost spent conlsiderable time
with this eleven, giving new plays to
the team, and checking up on the old
plays. A second eleven was also sent
through a signal drill.
A third team was pitted against one
of the freshman elevens for an hour's
scrimmage. Howie and Walt Webber
looked greatly improved at their re-
spective end and fullback positions,
while Leo Hoffman played well at
quarter. Miller also played a ster-
ling game at halfback and McIntyre
played well at guard.
YPSILANTI SMOTHERED
B. Y AN ARB O, 4 -0
YPSILANTI, Oct. 5.- After being
held to one touchdown in the first
three quarters, the Ann Arbor high
school football eleven cut loose with
a brilliant passing and running attack
to smother Ypsilanti by a 34 to 0
score.
Ann Arbor got away to a flying
start when Taylor took the ball over
the Ypsilanti goal within two minutes
after play had started. Webber failed
to kick goal. From then on, how-
ever, the locals tightened and Ann
Arbor was unable to score again un-
til the final period when Kagey took
the ball over on a line plunge.
Rathell then caught thr passes
in three attempts, to score 18 points
for Tlollaway's squad. Webber did all
the passing, with Stoll adding the
point after touchdown.
Stohl's all-around play featured the
contest.
The score by periods was as' fol-
lows:
1 2 3 4-Total
Ann Arbor ..6 0 0 28- 38
Ypsilanti .. .0 0 0 0- 0

American Clubs BILL McKECHNIE WINS PENNANT
H old Advantage AFTER THREE YEARS AS MANAGER'
Over Nationals A
(By Associated Press) cinnati he alternated with.Heinle
(EctePsPITTSBURGH, Pa., Oct. 5. - Bill Groli until he suffered a broken hand
T Br. Ass oia t. -itr- McKechnie, a third baseman of parts I in the second game of the 1917 sea-!
S I1TS3I3URQm, Pa., Oct. 5.-Victor- in h a a na -v o+'-if P+hn-h s sn ind was out of nw for anlmiost I

Pirate Manager

TRACK CANDIDATES FIRE
Lockers for fall practice will ( All fro
be assigned from 3 to 5 o'clock ested in
every day this week. to meet
Robert M. Grab, Mgr. ' wrestlin
gym nasi
Numera
who ma
LINCOLN, Neb., Oct. 5.-Clyde Mos-
er, 17, Dorchester high school foot-
ball player, died yesterday from injur- 1
ies received in a game Friday. his jRead
skull was fractured.

s

S1MAN WRESTLING
eshmen and others inter-
wrestling are requested
Coach Botchen in the
ng rooms at Waterman
dum, 3:30 o'clock Friday.
is are awarded for those
ke the freshman team.

i

ii

ious in 13 out of 21 world's series
clashes with teams of the National!
League, the American has, however,
only a small advantage in games won
and runs scored. Since 1903 the jun-
ior organization's clubs have captured
(5 contests to 59 for the Nationals
and scored 422 runs to 411 for their
opponents.
Even though the underdog, the Na-
tional League stands out in one re-
spect. Three times its representa-
tives in the series have swept to vic-
tory without allowing the AmericansI
a game. The Detroit Americans felt
the wrath of the Chicago Nationals in
1907, the Philadelphia Athletics were
humbled by the Braves in 1914 and
only three years ago the New York
Giants carried through four straight
conquests to defeat the New York
Yankees.
Another outstanding fact in this
world's series comparison is that no!
Boston team has ever experienced de-
feat. The Red Sox have captured
five titles and the Braves one.
f n
HORNSBY IS HOME RUN
CHAMP WITH 39 TOTL
CHICAGO, Oct. 5.-Rogers Hornsbyj
manager of the St. Louis Cardinals,
and champion hitter of the National
league, is the 1925 home run champion
of the major leagues.
The St. Louis star hit 39 during the
season while his nearest rival, Bob
Meusel of the Yankees, came through
with 33. "Babe" Ruth who holds the,
record for home runs in the majors,
with 59 smashed out in 1921, got a
late start this year and did not play
regularly, but he cashed in with 25,
tying Ken Williams of the St. Louis
Browns for third place among the1
four base clouters.
In 1922 sornsby had 42 homers,
a record of the National. league.
Players with 20 or more circuit
blows this season follow:

III 111,;1 kACLY UJ IU ct IIULtC UL t lLU!5UUt:rtt j

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has attained a national league pennant
after app,-oximately three seasons as
a manager.
McKechnie is a product of the sand-
lots and a much travelled ball player.
His life has been entangled with sev-I
eral of baseball's squabbles. Early
life found him playing third for the
Butler and Washington teams in his
home state and in 1907 he was pur-
chased by the Pirates, making his
first appearance in the majors at
about the time Henie Zimmerman
cropped up at second base for the
Chicago Cubs. Babe Adams also madeE
his bow that season.
In 1908 McKechnie was transferred
to Canton, 0., and a year later ap-
peared with Wheeling where he play-
ed remarkably and was adjudged the
best man at his position in the Cen-
tral League. In 1910 he rejoined the
Pirates and played very little, the
same holding for 1911 when the pres-
ence of Jack Miller, Bobby Byrne and1
Hans Wagner prevented any aspirant
from breaking into the infield.
St. Paul received him in 1912 and
in 1913 the Braves drafted him. He
played only one game in Boston and
drifted to the New York Americans.
Once again he went to St. Paul on
Aug. 22, 1913 to play alongside a
youthful shortstop who was destined'
to c4eate records in the majors-
Everett Scott, of the Red Sox and
Yankees, and now with the team that
will fight McKechnie's band in the
world's series, the Senators.
The next year the present Pirate
manager was among several who
jumped to the Federal League. He
proved to be one of the organization's l
greatest infielders with Indianapolis.
That year he batted .305. In 1915 the
team was transferred to Newark and
McKechnie succeeded Bill Phillips as
manager and won the pennant.
Another season saw the collapse of
~the Federals and for' a time Mc-!
Kechnie was out of work. He finally
went to the Giants in a settlement
which Harry Sinclair handled. In
New York he played brilliantly but,
the Giants lost eight straight battles,
only to swing through the West for
the first time and capture every game,
with the mauling bat of their third
baseman working overtime.
Returning to the Polo Grounds Mc-
Kechnie was the hero of New York,
only to be traded to Cincinnati two
days later along with Christy Math-
ewson and Eddie Roush for Charley
Herzog and Wade Killifer. At Cin-

te, entire scdule. y U
the entire schedule.

Hugo Bezdek, now Penn State ath-
letic director, but at that time the
Pirate manager, obtained him in 1918'
and McKechnie participated in every
game. Ile left baseball in 1919 to
enter business. The call of the dia-!
mond was too strong and he was back
in uniform in 1920, the year that Har-
old (Pie) Traynor appeared on the
.Pirate squad. Traynor came fast and
McKechnie was sent to St. Paul the;
next year, to be called in 1922 as
coach and assistant manager to
George Gibson, recently named mana-
ger of the Cubs. He succeeded Gib-
son as Pittsburgh manager on June
30 of that season and has remained
in control since.
Three times before this season, the
Pirates, under McKechnie, have been
pennant threats but no more. Each
season they have faltered in the
stretch, usually in tackling their main
rivals but this year it has been a dif-
ferent story. McKechnie, with Fred
Clarke as his adviser, has kept the
Pirates to the fore and when the cru-
cial test cam'e with the champion
Giants not long ago, the Pittsburgh-
ers came through triumphantly. '
MADISON, Oct. 5.-Earl S. ("Keg")
Driver, famous fullback of Wiscon-
sin's gridiron teams of 1901 and 1902,
and who has helped to make Wiscon-
sin football history as assistant coach
since that time, died at a Madison
hospital early Sunday morning of
heart disease. Mr. Driver was 47
years old. He was born and reared
at Darlington, Wis.I
LANSING, Oct. 5.- Coach Young
was driving his charges hard today=
for the next game. In spite of the
overwhelming defeat at the hands of
Michigan last Saturday the M. S. C.
gridders were determined not to drop
another game.

the Want Ads

Bill McKechlie I
Who will lead the Pittsburgh Na-
tionals against Washington in the
first game of the World's Series to-
morrow.
HOOSIES SCORELESS IN
PAST IAOLVERINE GAMES
When the whistle blows at Ferry
field next Saturday, the Wolverines
and Hoosiers will meet on the grid-
iron for the first time since 1903.
These two teams have only met four
times since football has been an insti-
tution at the two schools.
The first game was played in 1900
and the Indiana warriors were de-
feated 12-0. In 1901 Michigan won to
the tune of 33-0, 1902 saw the Yellow
: and Blue team romp over the Bloom-
ington aggregation 60-0. The last en-
counter in 1903 ended with Michigan
on the long end of a 51-0 score.

TI E
JOHNS T/ M UR JY
I-OE
The best of fine shoes

!f complete line
sizes in stock.

with all
$13.50

WGNIR COMPANY
for TI/en cz Ance 1&4&-

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FIVE [ADING HITTERS
IN MAJORLEAGUE GLUBS
1925
AB R H Pet.

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American League'
Heilmann, Detroit ...573 97
Speaker, Cleveland... 429 79
Simmons, Athletics...650 121.
'Cobb, Detroit .......416 96
Wingo, Detroit ... ....440 103
National League
Ilornsby, St. Louis...504 133
Bottomley, St. Louis..619 94
Wheat, Brooklyn . . . .616 125
Cuyler, Pittsburgh... 616 144
Harper, Phillies ....500 86

225
167
250
158
1G3
203
227
221
219
177

.393
.389
.385
.380
.371
.403
.367
.359
.356
.354

PARIS, Oct. ">.-Georges Carpentier,
the French light heavyweight pugilist,
has agreed to terms for a fight with
the winner of the bout between Jim-
my Delaney and Eddie Huffman, Am-
ericans, the end of December or the I
beginning of January. If Carpentier
wins, he says he will meet Paul Ber-
lenbach at New York.
Iittle investment-big returns, The
Daily Classifieds.-Adv.

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