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May 21, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-21

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DEDICATED
TO
JUSTICE

Sir z4an

~I~ii1P

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRFESS

VOL. XXXV. No. 172

EIGHT PAGIS

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY

21, 1925

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE ENT

STUDE[NT COUNCIL
ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR COMING YEAR
C01,MNA MADE VICE-PRESIDENT ;
BLASER SECRETARY; AND
OAKMAN, TREASURER

k{
I

PICK COMMITTEES
Xdopt Resolution to Name Body
Look Into Men's Housing

{
I
i
to
i

I

Conditions
Election of officers and committee
appointments were made at the first
meeting of the recently elected Stu-
dent Council, for 1925-26, held last
night at the Union. The retiring
council and the new body sitting as a
unit, received the report of Albert B.
Connable, '25, the retiring president
of the organization, following which
the new members. of the council,
elected on May 13, were formally in-
stalled. Kenneth C. Kellar, '26, the'
new president then took the chair and
the election of officers was conducted.
They are: William T. Colman, '26E,
vice-president, Earl L. Blasser, '27,
secretary, and Charles -. Oakman,
'26, treasurer. sy
Five a comi-nttees ~were asnnonfted by

Heads Wisconsin
,m
tio a eito o te entryM--
Gversiy frasn sin. gVe u. hrank sa.
the commencement address here in I
-9.
FHN WL H10
...
09GHOIIRI1

By Robert Henderson
('lhey you, you ladlies up (lere! I- The soloist irose from his chairn
tell you and I tell you to come in' to the condicor's stand. He
sopht, like a visper . . i My Gott,I^' wearing :,n is e-crem UU grey Sui t

A grey-haired man, small becausei
of his mussed worn suit, overwhelmedI
by the clutter of an orchestra cramp-
ed too tightly, was moulding into a
unit the raw chaos of a choral poem.
He had grown impassioned, leaning
far back, arching his body, as though
to draw from his players by sheer
tortion the beauty and terror that
was in the piece.
"Now! vit a great burst!" and hisj
cracked voice feverishly hummed a
bar, "Tum! Tum! Tum! Zo . ..
The second trombone disappeared
for a smoke. "Say listen!" one of
the violinists whispered to his part-
ner, "What's the uninteresting, ritzy
work they're doing this year?" The
two began to laugh softly, and stop-'
ped as suddenly; the fire and theeye
of the grey-haired man shot in their
direction.

i n1eeded p jressinig, and chewing

lozenge for his cold. He started to
take the tablet from his mouth, but
somehow it went the wrong way; he
choked and missed his signal. "Veil."
the conductor sighed drily, "ve do it
agen." The soloist laughed broadly,
apologetic and embarrassed.
. There is nothing quite so de-
pressing or interesting as the re-
hearsal of a May Festival oratorio,
unless it be the first rehearsal of a
play. The men in the orchestra are
bored and apathetic, exhausted after
a strenuous season, worried over
their union's demand for an increase
on overtime rates; the chorus is ner-
vous and bewildered; the conductor,
despairing. "Vunce more!" he calls
out, "and dis time you ladies be
avake!" lie waves his baton: "All
right! Vun! Too! Tree! ..."

RACHMANINOFF'S "THE BELL"''
WILL BE CHIEF WORK {
ON PROGRAM{
BACH IS INCLUDED
Choral Union to Assist Hagar, Mor-
gan, Tittini, in Singing Adap-
tation of Poe's Poem
Soloists for the second May Festi-
val cencert, which is to be presented
at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill auditor-
ium, will be Emily Stokes Hagar, so-
prano, Rhys Morgan, tenor, and
Charles Tittman, bass, assisted by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra, under
the direction of Frederick Stock, and
the University Choral Union, under
Prof. Earl V. Moore.
The chief work for this concert
Swill be Rachmaninoff's musical set-
ting for Edgar Allen Poe's poem The
Bells." The recently published Fes-
tival libretto comments on this can-
tata as- follows: "The association of
Edgar Allen Poe's poetry and Serge

next
was
that
a

CONCERT TONIGHT

i

"Vunce 'More" Cries Director
In Rehearsals For Festival

(SOLOISTS FEATUREFrost Chosen
To Give Speech
SEC0D FESTA AtCnocto

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n
IF
it
St
1t.S
~i
t
i

END PREPARATIONSFO IO 01I
Oriole Terrace Orchestra, Wolverines,
Are Chosen To Furnish Music
For Annual Affair

E[FFINGER SPEAKS
ATSENIOR BANQUE
More Than U)0 Literary Students
Attend Dinner; Roesser
Speaks for Students

the president to serve next year. The -~--_t
advisory committee will consist of the Editor of Century Magazine Indicates OMIT GRAND MARCH OTHERS JOIN IN SING
president, William T. Colman, '26E, Deflnite Acceptance to Head A review of the first concert I
Charles WGrube '26, Charles G. Oak- May Festival will be
an .'26 and George W. Davis, '26, sconsin With the final distribution of pro- Seniors of the literary college, found in the Music and Drama f
,managing editor of The Daily and an NOT SET grams and favors in the Union lobby more than 150 in number, gathered column.a
ex-officio member of the council. INAUGURATION this afternoon, preliminary prepara- last night at the Union for the annual t
Other committees appointed are: pep -- tions for the 1925 Senior Ball tomor- a. Later,
Meeting committee, which will consist New York, May 20.--Glenn Frank, row night will be completed. Most of grnuetjofdth gatl asesRachmaninoff's music is both natual
of Charles W. Grube, '26, chairman, editor of the te programs were given out yester- group joined with graduating classes and fortuitous. We may reflect on
Thomas H. Cavanaugh, '27L, and Vic- that h ould accept the day, and those holding tickets will of other schools and colleges in the + their common feeling for the fantas-t
tom E.mtee, whf,h ' the Disciplinary f o ncof e o t have their last opportunity from second Senior Sing of the year, held tic and the unseen threatening hor-
George Davis, '2 and Charles W.sitsin of until 5 o'clock today to obtain theirs. on the Library steps. ror; they seem to delight in the same
sity fWisconsin. Afew tickets are still obtainable.aking to senior literary stud- I emotional reaction to the klang of
Grube, '26, while the representatives Mr. Frank said that he will give Particular eniphasis has been words and the rythm of the poetic
to the Senate Committee on StudentrensithbaqthlDanJn
.Affair will e Wilimm T. ohn a nt up his position as editor of the maga- j placed this year upon the music for ents i the banquet hall, Dean John line or the musical phrase.f
Sa Carles. Oakan '26. The zine within a short time. He would the Ball, by the committee, headed by R. Effinger of the literary college "Rachmaninoff disciplines himself
men appointed by the president to not discuss what policies he would Markus Duffield, '25. In Ted Weems' said "there are two things every by avoiding the obvious in setting
serve on the housing improvement pursue in h'is new work. No definite Oriole Terrace orchestra of 12 pieces student should take with him as he , this lyric and musical text; he has
committee are George W. Ross, Jr., time for his inauguration as presi- r and Charlie Wolcott's Wolverines,scys seldom employed actual bells in the
'26, and Charles G. Oakman, '26. dent of the university has been set, the committee is confident that there leaves school. They are, first, a rev- o . Rather he has displayed a
The new council adopted a resolu- nor has any successor on the Cen- will be nothing lacking in the way erence for perfection; and second, fine sense of repression and-exress-
lion recommending that a committee tury magazine been selected, he an- of good music. Weems and his mu- a respect for ideals." Dean Effinger ion by seeking to suggest the con-
be organized, composed of represent- nounced. s sicians have firmly established them- also spoke of the future, saying trasted moods of the diferent bells:+
atives of the Student Council, Hous- A representative of the university i selves in Detroit, although they have "when members of this class return the sleigh bells of childhood; the gol-
of league, rnd the office of the Dean was with Mr. Frank today and re- I been in that city but a few months, to the University for the twenty-fifth den bells of youth and love; the
of dts for the purpose of dis-ceived his acceptance, which was im- coming from the East where they anniversary of their graduation, brazen bells of manhood and war;
cussing means of bettering the hous- mediately communicated to Madison. were acclaimed to be one of the finest the iron bells of old age and death.
ing situation for men on the campus, Mr. Frank gave his acceptance to popular dance organizations in the many who have contributed to the By an almost endless variety of com-
especiallyawith referenceptoicongds-tIprogress of the world. With the i
s John Callahan, state superintendent country. g binations of orchestral instruments
In the report of the activities of the of public instruction of Wisconsin Each orchestra will be placed class of 1900 which will return this and voices in new ryhhmic and har-
woncl for the year 1924-25, which and M. P. Olbrick of Madison, a mem- at one end of the Union ballroom. spring, there will come a celebrated monic effects, he has suggested the
was nade by the retiring president ber of the Board of Regents, who as Two platforms have been erected on professor, a renowned international jingling, the beating, the tolling, and
Sthe council, the following definite en in New York for two days in each side of the room at the center lawyer, a well known European cor-
of te conci, th folowig dfinie Ieven the discordant 'hum-tone' of the
accomplishments were noted: estab- consultation with himfor the faculty chaperones. Elab- respondent, and others whose names bells."
lishment of an office in the Union, E orate floral pieces of palms, ferns, are known to the world. So will it On Bach's selections from the "B
the creation of a fifty-yard line cheer- and potted plants will decorate the be with your class," he prophesied.
DISTIOUTD iminor Mass," the other important
ing section at Ferry field, realization !platforms and walls of the ballroom, Representing the student body m os offered tonight, the pro-
of student authority in discipline mat- as well as the reception room, porch, were William Roesser, '25, who told comi n o s tonight, the Bo
welaLhercpio oI prh gram comments as follows: "TheB
toms, organization of a freshman dis- n and hallways. Special lighting is of the value of student activities; minor Mass contains twenty four1
cipline committee, solution of the being installed for the occasion, and Elsa Olmacher, '25, vice-president of m which if given in their en- ,
and problem, placing of class dues icolored spot lights will- be played the class, representing the women; tirety result in a single performance
on a business-like basis, completion Lman S e 2, who soke of the te tina ingt one
of the new Student Council constitu- ;'Fnsians wil be distributed fromi upon the dancers throughout the ikxa,~ of exceptional length. Considering
t, iof the new lC iry csitu- teLary for the lastiued toay evening. four years at college; and Richard the limitations of expression in the
tion, naming of the new literary build- the Library for the last time today, tt Lawrence, '25, class-president.
ing after President Angell, solution of from 9:30 until 5 o'clock. Those who The committee decided to omit the Inc ss en polyphonic 18th century, we arvel
the block "M" difficulty, adoption of a have not obtained their copies by grand march this year owing to the c s oiat the emotional effects Bach obtains,
sytmgtIcolleges, together with the Varsity1attemoinlfecsBhobis,
new cheerleading system and new this time will be able to get them at fact that the Ball will not start un- , especially in the choruses: the rich
*uniforms, and promotion of definite the 'Ensian office at the Press build- til 10 o'clock. Several novelty num- trand, then met at the Library for the and elaborately ornamented Kyrie;
action on a Burton memorial. ing, beginning tomorrow. hers have been arranged by the tr ol sing ot the anguish of the Crucifixis. and the
Du{ n h(is tody fteds-ocetahwve.N htgahter' 7 o'clock. The sing continued unteagiho h rcfxs n h
mhetybs- s s. photograph til after dusk, Michigan songs, pop- overwhelming joy of the Resurrexit."
rig Studentstio, , k were delivered will be takei this year, members of ac , h o m The opening overture played by the
r to their purchasers. 1,764 on Tuesday the committee stated yesterday, and ular melodies, and those of formerss
T o Hoed Luncheon and 408 yesterday ccording to ithiey request that no corsages be yer en ug hl nadec rhsr ilb osogk'
Charles T. Lee, '27, who has directed worn. Tuxedos are desired, although that numbered several hundred, lis- "Night on a Bare Mountain."
the work at the Libraryb tened and applauded. The new supplementary stage,
Holding its last luncheon of the Those who have not yet fully paid sur formal wear is permissabre. which was used for the first time in
semester, the Cosmopolitan club will for their books or who have lost their efreshments will be served during the performance last night, provided
meet at 121I'loknx Stra the evening. Dancing wilt be con- ffff~lI
12:15 o'clock next Saturday receipts will be able to obtain their thclock.ng. DaningIwilrnbetcin-an effective grouping for both the
in the Church of Christ. The seniors books at the Press building, from 2 tinuous until 2:30 oclock IIIROPRTYorchestra and chorus, and gave an
of the organization are to be espec- to 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. All tfadded advantage to the various solo-
ially honored at this time and all i books not called for within two weeks, REts.0
members are urged to be present. will be sold. iIEM SNv AT Other numbers of special note in
Reservatfons can be made 1y callingII the remaining concerts are the chil-
7364 before tonight. V siyTo M D1u esn ve d the ven's Festival chorus, Friday after-
_____________________Band LTIVILIVIUWBL DAY DIR I Cty Assesor's office reveal the act!
" t I~that i tfraternity and sorority houses noon, and the performance of Pon-
Banquet'oni t -- -! in Ann Arbor are valued at a total of chielli's opera "La Gioconda," Satur-
ur & OMembers of the Richard N. Hall more than $1,555,000.00. Adding to day night, with Frances Peralta in
.. l V it b nost Veterans of Foreign Wars will this number at least 40 more fra- the title role.

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It

Robert Frost, proninent American
et who will return to the University
xt fall as holder for the second time
the fellowship in creative arts, will
ve the principal address at the
morial convocation in memory of
esident Marion L. Burton, which is
be held at 8 o'clock Thursday,
ay 28,in Hill auditorium.
The New England poet, who is the
thor of "New Hampshire," "Moun-
in Interval," "North of Boston" and
Boy's Will," was appointed last
tober by President Burton to re-
rn to the University in the fellow-
ip that he held two years ago.
Arrangements for the convocation
e in the hands of two committees
pointed by the Regents, a general
nmmittee consisting of represent-
ives from the Board of Regents, all
e schools and colleges of the Uni-
rsity, the student body, alumni,andi
wnspeople; and an executive coin-]
ittee.
The general committee will include
e Deans, Regent Junius E. Beal,
rof. A. L. Cross, representing the'
erary college, Prof. H. E. Riggs,
presenting the engineering college,
of. C. J. Lyons, the dental school,
of. John Sundwall, the public
alth department, Prof. G. C. Huber,
e medical school, and Prof. Evans
olbrook, the law school.
T. L. Cavanaugh, '27L, president of
e Union and Margaret Dixon, '25,
ling president of the Women's
ague will represenththe student
dy on the committee. Roy D. Cha-
n, ex'01, was named to represent the
umni and Mayor George E. Lewis,
e townspeople.
The executive committee, which
ill have active charge of all ar-
.ngements, is made up of Professor
ross, Professor Riggs, and Professor
olbrook.
' orest Fires
Rage In Upper
Part Of State
Detroit, May 20.-The conservation
epartment dispatched a detachment
f State police to investigate a forest
re near the Ausable river, which is
eported as having reached danger-
us proportions. At several points in
ie upper peninsula, state police
ere assisting in and directing the
ork of fighting the flames, which
re threatening to become the 'worst
the history of the state.
In the upper peninsula the situa-
on is rated as very serious. Traffic
ver the Duluth, South Shore and At-
ntic railway was halted today when
he flames blocked the railroad right
I way between Marquette and Ne-
aunee and threatened to destroy
ridges. A large number of the rail-
oad section hands and train crews
ere drafted into service in an effort
o save the company's property. Ban-
roft, Humboldt, Henrie, and Cham-
ion are reported as being in serious
anger, with all the male population
ighting to keep the flames away
rom the towns.
In the lower peninsula fire fighters
t Atlanta county seat, Montmorenty
ounty, won a hard fought victory
when they succeeded in saving th
own, although it is still encircled b
ire.
Sale Of Inlander
Continues Toda3
Sale of the poetry number of th
Inlander, campus literary magazine
will continue through today, in th
obby of Angell hall and at the book
stores, according to the editors. Th
May issue is notable for the decide
change in cover and interior make
up. The cover is laid out in a heav

block design, while the inside page
are arranged with striking margins
proportion, on deckle-edge paper.
Fourteen poems, submitted b
students, are included in the issue
Among the contributors are Su
Grundy Bonner, '26, Donald E. I
Snyder, '25, E. Lyle Davenport, '2
and Mary E. Cooley, '26.

WOLVERINE NINE
EASLY CONQUERS
M.S.C.; SCORE 1 3
MICHIGAN BATSMEN GATHER 1
HITS; HOVEY KNOCKED OUT
OF BOX IN FIRST
WALTER PITCHES
Three Homers, Three Triples, and
Five Doubles Included in 11
Extra Base Hits
By Carl E. Ohmacher
East Lansing, May 20.-Taking
Harry Wakefield, M. S. C. star pitch-
er for 19 hits, Michigan's Varsity
baseball team won a slugfest from
their opponents, 13-6, here this after-
noon.
Every man on the Wolverine team,
with the exception of Froemke, who
got in the game in the ninth inning,
got at least one safety off the Aggie
hurler, while Harlan Walter, who re-
lieved Hovey in the first inning, held
his opponents to seven hits which
were scattered throughout' the nine
innings he worked.
Michigan scored twice in the first
inning on an error, a base on balls,
and a double by Ryrholm, but the los-
ers came back in their half of the
same frame and got to Hovey for a
base on balls and three hits, one of
I them a three-bagger by Fremont be-
fore a man was retired. Three runs
1had crossed the plate when Walter
took up the pitching, and a sacrifice
fly by Kiebler, the first man to face
him brought in the fourth counter of
the inning. For the rest of the game
Walter had the Aggles on his hip and
was never in danger. A home run
by Zimmerman in the seventh and a
{ hit batsman and a triple by Spieker-
man in the following frame gave the
losers the rest of their runs, but the
game was on ice before they were
able to get to Walter with any effect.
After trailing, 4-2, for three inn-
ings the Michigan team ran wild in
the fourth, scoring six earned runs on
seven hits and a pair of fielder's
choices. The safeties included a
triple by Ryrholm and doubles by
Wilson and Cherry. Ten men batted
before the side was retired. In the
seventh, Dilman's double, Wilson's
sacrifice bunt and Cherry' sinugle
brought another, run over the plate.
The eighth frame closed Michigan's
scoring, four more runs being added
to the team's total. Home runs by
Pucklewartz and Coleman, a second
double by Wilson, singles by Hag-
gerty and Cherry and a fielder's
choice conspired in the scoring.
Wakefield pitched fairly effective ball
for three innings, but he blew sky-
high in the fourth, and from that
inning on was unable to hold the
Wolverines.
Chrery, Walter, and Haggerty led
the Michigan team's hitting. Cherry
got a double' and three singles out of
five times at bat, Walter th'ree singles
in five chances, while Haggerty had
a perfect day with two singles in two
legal trips to the plate. He walked
1 the other three times he came to bat,
r his three passes being the only ones
Y to be given by Wakefield. Froemke,
e I Friedman, and Davis were sent into

the game by coach Fisher
inning.
E BOX SCORE
Michigan AB R
Giles, 2b ..........6 1
Pucklewartz, cf ....6 3
Haggerty, 3b.......2 2
Ryrholm, rf ........5 1
Coleman, if ........5 1
Dillman, ss.......5 2
Wilson, lb ........4 2
Cherry, c ..........5 0
Hovey, p ..........00
Walters, p .........5 1
Froemke, rf ........1 0
Friedman, if .......0 0
Davis, c ...........0 0

in the last

H
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
4
0
3
0
0
0

aa
a 62Aa'/
. ~~ ; .k -_

a
i
1
t
I
t
i

.expects fa ir weather, probably
" ith a fall in temperature.
WHEN
You coie to the fork in
the road it is difficult to
fdo(id which nath to take.

i
,}
i
i

' Thetwefth annual vars1 y an Vw, 'w. ° " ~l uxxc xa z xx
banquet will be held at 6 o'clock to- I participate with the Varsity band and ternity, sorority, and society houses in
night in room 318 of the Union. Prof. the faculty of the military science the city which are leased from pri- B sa
Ralph W. Aigler of the law school department in a joint ceremony for aate individuals, and listed under
well be the speaker of the evening. the observance of Memorial Day, May various other titles, and the valua-I
Other speakers are Quen Kline, '26L, 30. The military ceremony observed tion figure exceeds the two million; cores
retiring president, Theodore Schneir- by the regular army will be rendered dollar mark.
la, grad, president-elect, and Robert at 12 o'clock at the University flag Latest statistics show that the aver-
A. Campbell. Robert B. Halsey, '25- pole.J age fraternity and sorority house N ATIONAL LEAGUE
student manager, will be toastmaster.I Members of the University R. O. T.' here is assessed at $25,491.83. The New York 6, Chicago 1.
Besides the speeches there will be C. will be unable to take part in the I valuation of the 61 structures, in- Pittsburgh 12, Brooklyn 1.
several novelty acts and plans for the ceremony as the issued uniforms will cluding the property in many cases, Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 4.
coming year will be outlined. have been returned before this date. runs from $8,250, the lowest figure, to Cincinnati 15, Boston 8.f
The military science department is, $70,000, the highest assessed house.#
however, negotiating with the War 1 AMERICAN LEAGUE
Change Place For department for the purpose of obtain- S cDetroiti7,yWashington 3.
IDI ing enough field artillery ordnance panZSt Io ety Chicago 10, Boston 7.
Alumnus aymntIe for a salute of 21 guns. Immediately EsIr Cleveland 10, New York 9.
following the artillery salute the OPhiladelphia 8, St. Louis 6.
After today, the University treas- Varsity band will play the national
_ . .«,n+t ,,,hp +hm n dtewhic.h will he 8+ 1. ( .sBrtlev '26. was elected nresi-I -'- ....

O
4
2
0
1
1
3
7
7
0
0
0
0
2
27
O
2
2
2.
8
4
1
1
7
0
0

Geneva, May 20.-Edouard Benez,
foreign minister of Czecho-Slovakia,
was elected unanimously president of
the seventh international labor con-
ference.
SENIORS
Members of the senior liter-
Srvi clas will.h e "iven their I

Totals ............44 13
Michigan State AB R
Zimmerman, rf ....4 1
Richards, ss.......5 1
Fleser, cf ..........5 2
Fremont, c........5 1
Kiebler, 3b........3 0
Raney, 2b.... ...4 0
Fisher,f .........3 0
Speikerman, 1b ....4 0
Wakefield, p ......4 0
Haskins, if ........0 1
Totals............37 6
Summaries-Two base

A
2
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
6
A
0
6
0
4
1
5
0
0
1
0

E
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
E
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

19
Hi
1
1
3
1
0
1
1
1
1
0

10 27
hits,

17 3
Ryr-

holm, Wilson 2, Cherry, Dillman.
Th n n .N.,.. ta-& n r . 0 31

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