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May 14, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-14

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W

DEDICATED
TO
JUSTICE

C, 4r

Itr

attAir

MEMBER
ASSO C D
PRESS

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.. .. .........

PRICE FIVE_.._ CEN...,h

VOL. XXXV. No. 166

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1925

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CEN'T6

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CIL

PRESIDE

c

Harriman

Speaks

On

Profession

Of Writing ADAMS IS SELECTED TO LEAD
Council Leader UNION, AFTER CLOSE CONTEST;
a. BARTON ELECTED SECRETARY

NEW PUBLICATION HERDS NNONCE
APPOINMENTS OUPPER STAFFS

Depicts Travels

''COLOR PICTURE!'
OF EGYPT, IND
'SHOWNBYSA5N
'AUTOC II lHRO 3AI C PO ,EC'
DEMONSTRATION BY NOT
SWISS TRAVELER
METHODS PRAISI

NAXES OF CHIMES APPOINTEES
WITHHELD UNT;I LATER
DATE
Upper staff appointments to the
business and editorial staffs of the
yarious campus publications were an-
nounced by the business managers
and managing editors following the
address by Karl E. H~arrimni, '98,
at the annual Publications banquet
last night. Appointments were made
for all publications except Chimes
editorial, these being postponed until
a later date.

EDITORt TELLS OF ROMANCE
IOUND IN WRITING
PROFESSION
Karl Edwin Harriman, '98, editor
of the Blue Book and Red Book, gave
the address of the evening at the an-
nual Publications banquet last night
at the Union. The dinner was tender-
ed by the Board in Control of Student
Publications to 450 students who have
been working on the various campus
publications during the past year.
D ir. iti rofession of writing

ED

Slides Depict IPhases of "Native
InIndiiala nd Trip Alonig
Nile Ither

Life

Prof. William Sandoz's lecture on
"The Egypt of the Pharaohs" and

i

rie Daily as one filled with romance, Mr. iar- "India and its Splendors" which was
George W. Davis, '26 ,managing ed- riman told stories about the careers given at 8 o'clock last night in Hill
itor of The Daily for next year an- of many of the greatest lauthors of auditorium was illustrated by Pic-
nounced the following appointments the present day and told of the way tures in natural colors. The process
to the upper editorial staff: editor, in which they had attained success. of tinting the pictures which was
Norman R. Thal, '26; news editor, "All writers must face a period of j perfected by Professor Sandoz gave
Manning A. Houseworth, '26; city discouragement," said Mr. Harriman. Prof. William Sandoz, noted Swiss a clear picture with more delicate
editor, Robert S. Mansfield, '26; ad- "They must not expect to receive the traveler, showed pictures of Egypt coloring than is usual in colored
visory editors, Thomas P. Henry, enormous prices for their works which and India last night in Hill auditori-Iphotography.
Jr., '26; and Kenneth C. Kellar, '26; they hear are sometimes paid, but um by means of a new methods of I The lecture on Egypt took the
sports editor, Carl E. Ohlmacher, '25; must be satisfied with many of their autochromatic projection. form of a trip up the Nile river with
women's editor, Helen S. Ramsay, writings being returned to them, and side trips of exploration to the old
'26; music and drama editor, Robert with receiving payment for their ac- jntemple and palace ruins. These were
1. Henderson, '26; telegraph editor, cepted works but infrequently. There- I1shown by the colored "autochroma-
William J. Walthour,'26; humor editor, in lies the romance of writing," said L1lN S IV90UL l ll tic projection" after having been
Valentine Davies, '27; night editors, j Mr. Harriman. first explained by printed slides. The
Leslie S. Bennetts, '27, Smith H. Cady, "Half of the enormous prices which Ifpictures showed, besides the Sphynx
Jr.,' 27, Stanley C. Crighton, '27, are paid are for the material content and Pyramids, some of the little
Willard B. Crosby, '27, Robert T. De- of stories and half for the 'label' known tombs at Cairo, Thebes and
yore, '27, Leonard C. Hall, '26, Thomas which the writer has attained through Luxor.
G. Koykka, '27, and W. Calvin Patter- years of work," he added. s1udents Will Meet at 7:l5 o'clock; The Indian pictures were more
son, '27; assistant city editors, Irwi "Every editor is willing and anxious Free Movies to be Shown in varied than those of Egypt, showing,'
Olian, '27, and Frederick H. Shillito, to receive works by young writers 1111 Auditorium in addition to the temples and pal-
'27. and they will always read them, for -. aces of that country, many phases of
Byron W. Parker, '26, business j in many cases these writings contain native life. The sacred city of Be-
manager of The Daiy announced four ansupie adrreta- LOUD SPEAKER DONATED e Csar cy0 -
pleasant surprises and rare treas- nares with the Taj Maha and the
appointments to the upper staff ,They ures," he said. "Editors do not de- Ganges river were shown as well as
are as follows: advertising contract spair when they know that all over i Plans are being made by the Cap the older shrines and temples. In
department, Thomas Olmstead, '27; the country there are bodies of young Night committee of the Studentclosing the lecture the Swiss pro-
advertising copyright, William L. men and women such as those work- Council for a record-breaking atten- fessor showed several sunset scenes
Mullins, '27; local advertising, Frank ing on the publications at Michigan dance at the annual ceremonies at which presented this tropical country
R. Dentz, '26; accounts, Paul Arnold, who are interested in writing. TheyI Sleepy Hollow tomorrow night. It in its most beautiful aspect.
'27E. Circulation, publication and will always welcome aspiring writers is expected that the natural amphi- 'Autochromatic projection" is a re-
foreign advertiseing appointments will into a field ot romance, friendship, theater will be filled by the thousands cent departure in the art of photog-
be announced within the next ten and wide opportunities, and all of of students, from the seniors garbed r . t wdel d in
days. them are looking forward to the time in their traditional caps and gowns raphy and is not ye witl usei
The Sunmer Daily when, after guiding the footsteps of down to the first year men with their Its ing plans to ma it in the
Appointments to the editorial staff the coming generation of writers, they little green caps which will be tossed future.

i
i
i

Kenneth C. Kellar, '26, was elected
president of the Student council for

1925-26 at the
yesterday.

campus elections heldI

of The Summer Daily were announced can step into the background and re-
by Norman R. Thal, '26, managing ed- tlize that their ambition is fulfilled
itor of The Summer Daily, as follows: and that their duty is done."
news editor, Robert S. Mansfield, '26;j
city editor, Manning A. Houseworth,, Sale
'26; chairman of the editorial board,CT et
Frederick K. Sparrow, Jr., '25; tele-
graph editor, Leslie Bennetts, '27; Started For
night editors, Willard B. Crosby, '27,
and W. Calvin Patterson, '27; women'sFathers'D ay
editor, Marian Mead, '26.
John Conlin, '26, business manager
of The Summer Daily announced the Tickets for the Father's Day pro-
following appointments: advertising, gram at the Union were placed on!
Thomas Olmstead, '27; accounts, sale yesterday at Graham's bookstore at
Charles Daugherty, '27; publication, each end of the diagonal and they
Frank Schoenfield, '27E; circulation, may also be obtained at the main
Margaret Sandberg, '27. desk in the Union. The tickets,;
Gargoyle which are priced at $1.50, will admit
Appointments to the editorial staff the holder to the banquet at the
of Gargoyle were announced by Union Saturday night, to the swim-
Walker A. Everett, '26, managing edi- ming pool and to the Majestic or
for of Gargoyle, as follows: assistant Arcade theatres in the evening after
editors, Calvin Pollins, '26, and Neal the banquet.'
Nyland, '26; art editor, Fred Hill Jr.,-i Arrangements have been made with
'27; editorial, Marvin Averbrook, '27, the golf and country clubs here for
Frederick W. Ziv, '27, Phillis D. the visiting fathers to play golf dur-
Richards, '28, and C. Robert Swine- ing their stay and guides will be
hart, '27; art, William Dibble, Jr., '27, furnished by the Union Saturday
Norman Gilmore, '26L, Henry Wool- morning to escort the men about the
fenden, Jr., '27, Frederick Wykes, '27, campus. The Union pool will be
and Ralph C .Smith, '26A. open to the visitors and house par-
Announcement of appointments to ties are being planned by a number
the upper business staff of Gargoyle of fraternities in honor of the visiting
by Frederick E. Sturmer, '26, .busi- parents.
ness manager, were as follows: Les- Friday evening those men who have
ter Smith, '27, Robert Johnson, '27, already arrived will be the guests
Morris Brush, '27, John Halstead, of honor at the Cap Night ceremonies
'27, George Black, '27, Charles in the evening.
fumphrey, Jr., '27, Jack Patterson -
'27, Raymond Read, '27, Sylvan Rosen- Officers Elected
baum, '27, and Walter Decker, '27.
Definite positions on the upper staff For Varsity Band
will be appointed next fall.
(Continued on Page Two.) Officers of the Varsity band for
next year were elected at a meeting

into the huge bon-fire at the com-
pletion of the ceremonies.
A loud-speaker, which has been
donated by the electrical engineering
department, wll be constructed on the
speaker's stand in order that the
entire assemblage may hear the
speakers. William J. Everitt, Louis
A. Dorff, and Louis N. Holland, of
the electrical engineering depart-
ment are in charge of constructing
the loud speaker.
All students are requested to form
in line and march to the Hollow at
7:15 o'clock. Seniors in caps and
gowns will assemble in front of Bar-
bour gymnasium, and the juniors
will form in line directly west of the
medical building. Sophomores will
gather between the Chemistry and
Natural Science buildings, while all
freshmen will meet in front of the Li-
brary. The line of march will be
from Barbour gymnasium to Twelfth
street, on to Huron, east on H-uron to
Glen street, then north to Ann and
east to the Hollow.
The ceremonies will start at 7:30
o'clock and all classes will sit as

Athletic Policy
Will Be Studied
By Faculty Men
On the request of the Senate Coun-
cil, made in their regular meeting
Monday, Acting President Alfred H.
Lloyd yesterday appointed a commit-
tee of five, representing the entireI
University, to make a study of the
athletic situation in the University in
view of questions which are likely to
arise.
Due to the fact that the word "in-
vestigate" was used in the original
announcement that the committee
would be appointed, thereby casting
the reflection that something was
wrong, President Lloyd said yester-
day, "There was not the slightest idea
in the minds of the Senate Council
that there was anything wrong with
the athletic system or policy. One
of the most important things that
this committee will take up is the
present lack of intramural equip-
ment."
The committee will consist of Dean
Edmund E. Day of the business ad-
ministration school, chairman, Prof.
Ralph W. Aigler of the law school,
Dean Joseph A. Bursley, Prof. Alfred
H. Lovell of the engineering college,
and Prof. Arthur E. R. Boak of the
- history department, who is on leave
of absence, but is expected back in
the near future. This committee will

TALOR SOCIETY
WILL HEAR LLOYD
management Problems Will Be Tople
For Diseusslon by State
Industrial Leaders
WILL LAST THREE DAYS
Acting-President Alfred H. Lloyd
will deliver the address of welcome
before the Taylor society, which
opens a three-da:y convention here
today. The purpose of the organiza-
tion, which is composed of leaders of
Michigan industry and management
experts from all parts of the coun-
try, is to promote those administra-
tive policies and methods of manage-
ment necessary to meet changing in-
dustrial conditoins.
At the opening session of the socie-
ty at 4 o'clock this afternoon in the
Union, C. L. Barnum, consulting en-
gineer of Pleasantville, New York,
will read a paper on "Daily Problems
in a Manager's Office." A discussion
will be led by three prominent man-
agement executives. This session is
planned primarily for students of
management in the engineering col-
lege and school of business adminis-
tration, and for the younger execu-
tives attending the meeting.
The second session at 8 o'clock to-
night in the Union will be devoted to
management problems from the point
of view of the banker-investor. H. I.
Shepard, vice-president of Guardian
Trust company of Cleveland, will
read a paper on "A View of Indus-
trial Management That Interests
Both Engineers and Banker," after
which a discussion will be held.
Friday's sessions will pay special
attention to Michigan's leading indus-
try, the automobile business. All
sessions of the society will be held in
the Union, except the meeting Friday
night, which will be held in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium. All meet-
ings are open and anyone interested
is invited to attend.
Wagner Explains
Gypsy Folk Musiu

DIENER AND LAURENCE FORCE COLMAN
LEADER IN RACE FOR C
UNION OFFICE
LIKERT LEADS S. C. A. R(
Dixon Defeats Salzman by 158 Votes Grube,t
For Executive Position of Chose
Oratorical Association
Allan B. Adams, '27L, was elected Kennetl
to the presidency of the Union by a president
total of 701 votes, a majority of 88 a majorit
votes over his nearest opponent, Wil- one of t
liam Diener, '26. elections
Roy H. Callahan, '26, won the posi- His total
tion of literary vice-president by a William'
majority of 240 votes. Rensis Likert, candidate
'26E, was elected to the engineering smaller t
vice-presidency with a total of 262 fact that
votes, while the law vice-presidency ballots v
went to Egbert R. Isbell, '26L. offices, ai
Robert J. Cooper, '26M, received i a large
the position of medical vice-presi- registered
dent, with a total of 110 votes, his The to
opponent Wesley G. Reid, '25, receiv- voted for
ing 100 votes. The combined vice- numbered
presidency went to E. Romley Ro- more tha
mine, '26D, by a 46 vote majority tered dur
over Eugene K. Buck, '26D. Romine ted for t
received 175 votes. Burton A. Groff, charge of
'25P, received 26 votes. continuou
Rensis Likert, '26E, was elected ternoonu
president of the Student's Christian ing, befo
association with a total of 856 votes, checked.
a majority. of 206 over John H. El- The me
liott, '26, who ran second. George F. men and.
lackert, '26, received 402 votes. Grube, '2
The presidency of the Oratorical '26, 969;
association went to William C. Dixon, other car
'26, whose total exceeded that of El- received
mer II. Salzman, '27L, by 158 votes. Charles I
Dixon received 1247 votes. Frank P. clan Lan
Weaver, '26, received the vice-presi- 549; Ebe
dency with a total of 1297 votes, a ma- B. Crouc
Jority of 90 over Elizabeth Van Val- Parks, '2
1kenburgh, '26. Victor
Marguerite V. Dutton, '26, was Cavanaug
elected seicretary by a majority of 344 '27, were
votes over Dorothy I. Cline, '26. Miss as junior
Dutton received 1039 votes in all. were 148
Miriam Avf. Olden, '27, received 417 The othe
votes. Theodore R. Hornberger, '27, of votes
was elected treasurer with a total of R. King,
1426 votes, a majority of 570 over '27, 464;
Robert S. Miller, '27. 455; Eu
Keith H
Crighton
'27, 310;
ILLSEL 5 ICKETS James F.
Three
FOR SENIORBALL T009Y on theI
Publicati
tors in

LOSES LEADERSHIP OF
OUNCIL BY MARGIN
OF 98 VOTES
)SS 13 WINNER
Oakinan, and Ensel Are
n For Positions of Senior
Councilmen
h C. Kellar, '26, was elected
of the Student Council by
ty of 98 votes yesterday in
he most closely contested
ever held on the campus.
vote was 1260 and that of
T. Colman, '26E, the other
was 1162. This vote is
han was expected due to the
many students made out
without voting for all the
nd also due to the fact that
number of the students who
d failed to vote at the polls.
tal number of students who
the candidates on the ballot
d 2,520 as compared with
an 4,500 students who regis-
ring the three days designa-
that purpose. The staff in
f counting the ballots worked
usly from 4:30 yesterday af-
until 1:30 o'clock this morn-
re the last ballot had been
en elected for senior council-
their votes were: Charles W.
6, 1255; Charles G. Oalkman,
Lee Ensel, '26, 883. The
4didates and the votes they
were John L. Gow, '25E, 771;
D. Livingston, '27L; 618; Lu-
e, '26L, 599; Phil Rowe, '25,
n M. Graves, '25E, 458; Allin
h, '26, 398; L. Beaumont
26L, 275.
E. Domhoff, '27, Thomas H.
gh, '27L, and Earl L. Blaser,
elected to serve next year
r councilmen. Their votes
1, 1041, and 676 respectively.
r candidates and the number
they received were Thomas
27E, 512; Willard B. Crosby,
Thomas G. Olmstead, '27,
gene B. Power, '27, 430; G.
utchins, '27, 337; Stanley C.
, '27, 335; Hugh Chalmers,
S. Tyler Watson, '27, 286;
. Boyer, '27, 266.
men were elected to serve
Board in Control of Student
Ions for 1925-26. The vic-
the balloting were John G:
ouse, '25, 1066; Harold A.
'26, 780; Lucian Lane, 26L,
he men who were defeated
votes they scored were
L. Pattee, '25, 772; Robert G.
'25, 734; William L. Diener,
Harry G. Messer, '26, 718;
W. Ross Jr., '26, 482; Heil M.
11, '25, 467; Frederick H. Pin-
L, 462; Joseph E. Gandy, '26,

(
I

Members of the Senior Ball com-,
mittee will be at the desk in the
lobby of the Union from 3 to 5
o'clock today to dispose of 35 tickets
to the Ball which were not called for
yesterday.
Approximately 250 seniors whose
applications were accepted have now
procured their tickets. An open sale
of the remaining tickets will be con-
ducted this afternoon at which time

Garlingh
Marks,'
774. TI
and the
George I
Ramsay,
'26, 726;
GeorgeI
Rockwel
ney, '271
310.

any member of the class may apply. The three students elected to the
Those, who still hold acceptance Board in Control of Athletics and the
cards may call at the Union today, or votes they scored were Richard F.
communicate with James Trudell, '25, I Doyle, '26, 1930; Harry Hawkins, '26E,
'phone 8117, tomorrow, when they 1549; Richard H. Freyberg, '26, 1495.
will be able to obtain tickets if all Doyle received the largest vote cast
are not sold by that time. for any one candidate on the ballot.
Programs for the dance will be The other candidates and their votes
available early next week. An- Iwere George W. Ross Jr., '26, 1402;
1 nouncement of the exact time and Glen Donaldson, '26, 724; William B.
place of distribution will be made in Etheridge, '27L, 625.
The Daily. George W. Ross Jr., '26, was vic-
The committee has received numer- torious in the race for the -position
ous inquiries recently as to the prop- of varsity cheerleader, receiving 1264
er dress for the affair. Members of votes. The other candidate, Edward
the committee decided yesterday that L. Newhall, '26, received 857 votes.

units. The speakers will be James
' O. Murfin of the Board of Regents,
Prof. William A. Frayer of the his-
tory department and William D.
Roesser, '25, retiring manager of The
Daily, who wil speak for the students.
Following the ceremonies a free
movie will be given at Hill auditor-
ium, through the courtesy of the Ma-
jestic and Arcade theaters. The Ma-
jestic theater was offered for the
show but the Student Council selected
the auditorium due to its greater
seating capacity. Doors to the audi-
torium will be opened at 9 o'clock
and the picture will be shown at 9:34
r o'clock.

,1

Prof Charles P. Wagner of the

i)
r

report directly to the University Sen- lRomiance languages department spoke
ate. on Spanish gypsy folik lore music be-
mreting last night at the Union. Pro-
S e ksfessor Dagner pointed out the origin
At Joint Banquet of different types of the popular
gypsy music. using the piano and
victrola for many of his illustrations.
Mayor Robert Campbell was the Angeline Wilson, '27, accompanied by
principal speaker at the first annual her sister Gwendolyn, sang several
I Acacia-Phi Kappa banquet held last Spanish songs

j "uedos will be worn, although 7
wearing summer formal attire
not be denied entrance. They
have requested that the women
not wear corsages.
SFNIDRS GATHER FOR

men
will
also
will

CABOT TO BE HONORED
IBY QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY
S Dean Hugh- Cabot of the Medical

RESULTS
Of elections, horse-races, baseball

of the Band association last night. T.
C. Schneirla, grad., was chosen to
succeed Q. M. Kline, '26L, as presi-I
dent of the organization. R. A. Bur-
hans, '25, was elected vice-president.

Baseball
Scores
AMERICAN LEAGUE

!l 1
l
T
1
i
3

I

school will receive the honorary de-
FIRS SI NOiIY E ~ Igree of doctor of laws on June 13, in
5~~~~~~ RH I - .- . elatIel. Th dereewil1b

I 1j u1 V11lu W IBelfast, Ireland. The degree will be
Sconferred by Queen's university, in
Several hundred members of the U r connection with the visit to Ireland
ss oftheUnibry of American doctors associated with
gathered on the steps of the Library the Interstate Post Graduate assem-
last night for their first Senior Sing. bly.
ThP arsit hand. led by Robert Hal- ; ..

w 6.1 6 1 %r I W- . -

night at the Union. In order that every member of the
It is planned to make this banquet society may have a chance to vote for3
plan .ned T+ -,o m nrlnlnrla .- ,,.i41 --, Ir

w. . w . ! M

1'

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