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May 10, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-10

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DEDICATED
TO
JUSTICE

sir 4ian

at'l

I

Section

One

VOL. XXXV. No. 163

SIXTEEN PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 10, 1925

SIXTEEN PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PUBLICATiONS M0AP11,POIN TENTS0
Eti
CHiMES INCORPORATED WITH NEW MANAGING EDITORS WILL
DAILY FEATURE SECTION; ANNOUNCE UPPER STAFF
STAEBLER NAM1D .SELECTIONS
CHOOSE NOMINEES EDITOR WILL SPEAK

REGISTRATION LIMIT IS
SXTENDEI ONE MORE DAY
Registration booths for the
annual All-campus elections,
Wednesday, May 13, will be
conducted from 9 to 2 o'clock
tomorow for the convenience
of those students who failed to
S(register on last Thursday and
Friday. No one will be permit-
ted to cast a ballot in the elec-
tions without registering. All
indications point toward a vote
Sofrecord proportions.
Booths will be located in
front of- the Union, at the State
street end of the diagonal, in
front of the library, and in the
engineering arch.

Everett, Sturmer to Guide Gargoyle;
Crouch Will Direct 'Ensien; Thal
Picked on Summer Daily
Managing editors and business
managers of campus publicatoins for
the coming year were appointed by
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications at their annual meeting yes-
terday afternoon. Chimes, campus
opinion magazine, was discontinued,
its place to be taken by an enlarged
Sunday second section of The Daily,
edited by a staff appointed directly
by the Board.
George W. Davis, '26, was appoint-
ed managing editor of The Daily. By-
ron W. Parker, '26, was chosen for
the business managership. The 1926
Michiganensian will be under the di-
rection of Ain B. Crouch, '26, man-
aging editor, and Frederick M.
Phelps, Jr., '26, business manager.
Chimes, which will be published
weekly and distributed as the SundayI
second section of The Daily, will be
edited by Neal Staebler, '26, with
Kenneth G: Smiles, '26, business man-
ager. Walker A. Everett, '26, was
chosen managing editor of Gargoyle
and Frederic E. Sturmer, '26, will be
the business manager. The Summer1
Daily this summer will be guided by
Norman Thal, '26, on the editorial
side, and John Conlin, '26, on the
business.
The following men were nominated
for the student memberships of the
Board in Control of Publications,
who will be voted on. at the campus
elections Wednesday and three of
whom will serve on the Board next.
year: John Garliughouse, '25, Robertt
Gaylord Ramsey, grad., Heil M.
Rockwell, '25, Lucian Lane, '26L,
Frederick H. Pinney, '27L, George W.
Ross, Jr., '26, William L. Diener, '26,
Harry G. Messer, '26, and Joseph G.
Gandy, '26.
In arranging for the future of
Chimes, the Board passed the follow-
ing resoluiton: "Resolved, that the
Chimes, in its present form be discon-
tinued and that the Sunday second
section of The Daily be materially
enlarged to take the place of thet
Chimes and be managed by a manag-t
ing editor and business manager ap-
pointed by, and responsible to the
Board."
The men elected by the Board yes-
terday will appoint their own staffs,
the selection to be announced at the
annual Publications Banquet Wed-t
nesday night.
WOL VERINE NET
TEAM DEFEATS
ILLINOIS, 4-3
(Special to The Daily)
Champaign, Ill., May 9.-Michigan's
tennis team, encountered stiff compe-
tition here today when it defeated
Illinois, 4-3. In the singles Jerome
fought hard to conquer Goodwillie,
who gave him a scare when he forced
him to go 7-5 in the first set. The
second set was considerably easier,
6-0 being the score.
Captain Crane was defeated in his
match with Seoof, 6A, 6-1. Schoof's
steadiness wore the Wolverine leaer
out.
Krickbaum handily disposed of
Johns 6-2, 6-4, in two fast sets. Elliott
also had very little trouble taking
Duback into camp, 6-3, 6-1. Vose was
the other singles loser, going down
2-6, 6-3, 6-2.
In the doubles Krickbaum and Vose
defeated Johns and Earle, 6-4, 6-1.
This doubles match was a deciding
factor as Michigan lost the other dou-
bles, when Crane and Jerome bowed
to Goodwillie and Schoof, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2.

IIawriman, '98, Chief of Red Book And
Blue Book Will Address 100
Students

Karl Edwin Harriman, '98, editor of Seniors Plan For
the Red Book and Blue Book maga- W
zines, will be the speaker and guestg
of honor at the annual banquet givenI
by the Board in Control of Student Seniors will hold their first Sing
Publications for the members of the on the steps of the Library Wednes-
various staffs, next Wednesday night a.,nght A r

IN ANNUAL GAMES
FRESHMEN TAKE TWO OF THREE
HEATS IN OBSTACLE
RACE
LOSE CANE SPREE
Sophomores, Hindered by Superior
Nunibers, 'rake Rope-Tying
Contest
Taking two of the three heats in
the obstacle race, the freshmen were
awarded one point in the Spring
Games, which, with the two points
won in the tug of war Friday, gave a
victory to the class of '28.
The first heat of the race was in-
terrupted when a stray dog lashed
down the track and collided with the
freshman runner. The committee in 1
charge decided thegt the dog could
not be considered as a legitimate ob-
stacle; hence in fairness to the fresh-I
man class the heat was run over after
the cane spree.
The second heat in this event went
to the sophomores, the third heat to.
the freshmen, and the first heat whren
run over was won by the freshmen.j
The sophomore class staged a
comeback by easily winning the cane
spree. At the end of 10 minutes the
sophomores had 5 canes, the fresh-
men 3, and 2 combats ended in a
draw.
(Continued on Page Two.)

Edgar Guest
Will Address
Mothers Today
Edgar Guest, Detroit Free Press
poet and author of many well known
poems concerning mothers, will be
the principal speaker at 3 o'clock to-
day in Hill auditorium at the Moth-
ers' Day meeting arranged by the
Student Christian association. Field-
ing H. Yost, director of intercolleg-
iate athletics, will introduced the
speaker.
Mr. Guest has not announced a
subject for his address this after-
noon but it will pertain to mothers.
The meeting is being held in honor
of the mothers who are visiting sons
and daughters in the University, but
it will be open to all students and
townspeople. It is not being limited
to students who are entertaining
f their mothers as guests in Ann Arbor
over the week end.
James K. Miller, '25, chairman of
Mothers' Day committee, will be the
presiding officer for the meeting.
Scripture reading and prayer will be
given by Rev. Mr. Donald Timerman,
director men's work, Wesley hall. Mrs.
Miller, the mother of the chairman,
and Mrs. Hayden, mother of Perry
Hayden, '25, will be on the platform
with their sons as guests of honor.
The Girls' Glee club will sing several
songs as the special music feature of
the meeting.
(Continued on Page Three)
NATURAL PCUE

at the Union. At this tme the new
managing editors and business man-
agers of the campus publications will
announce their upper staff selections.
Mr. Harriman, who has been man-
aging editor of the Ladies' Home
Journal, as well as the Red Book,
Blue Book and Green Book, was bornI
in Ann Arbor in 1875. He entered the
University in the class of '96, but left
(Continued on Page Two)
ILL HOLD ANNUAL
Officers Will le Selected for Seven
Campus Activities; Women May
Vote on Four

uay nzgn .arrangements are being
made by a committee of the class un-
der the direction of David Bramble,

MiCHiGAN CONQUERS 0 u. 5.
IN TRACK, '84 k.51I5BASEBALL
NINE LOSES TO BADGERS,]-
THREE VARSITY PITCHERS FAIL EACH TEAM MAKES FIVE RE-
TO CHECK WISCONSIN CORDS; NINE SMASHED,
BATSMEN ONE EQUALLED
HIT TWO HOMERS HUBBARD TIES MARK

25.
The second Sing has been sched-
uled for May 20, following the annual'
Senior Banquet at the Union. Plans 1
have been completed for the broad-
casting of the music at this time by a
Detroit , radio station. Caps and l
Gowns will be worn both nights.
Lafayette, Ind., May 9.-Purduej
scored a close victory over North-
western here today in a dual track+
meet, 72-63.

. ,...,, ......, .,. ...a 4n . .. "l

Off intiol

D1ilni

Professor
Wvill

Sandoz, World Traveler,
Speak on Old Egypt,
and India

MUST BE REGISTERED'WILL USE AUT C
Selection of officers for seven cam-
pus activities will be made Wednesday ALL AM PUS EL ECTION, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13(A1 t chroiiati projection, a radical
when all students of the University departure in the reproduction of pic-
who have registered will vote upop ue ntesren ilb sdt
the candidateswhodwere, nominated I INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a cross in the square ([ I) before tures on the screen, will be used o
illustrate the lecture to be given by'
for the offices during the last week. the name of the candidate for whom you wish to vote. Prof. William Sandoz, Swiss world
Activities to which officers will be.,
elected are the Union, the Student traveler and lecturer, on "Egypt of
Council, Student Christian associa- Chrstthe Pharaohs" and "India and It's
tion, Oratorical board, BoardainrCon- M ichigan Union Students' Christian!Splendors" at 8 o'clock Wednesday,
trol of Student Publications, Board inMa13inHlautoum
Control of Athletics, and Varsity A *May 13, in Hill auditoriunm.
cheerleader. (Al eso Vote) ssociation The pictures as projected on the
Women students who have filled out PRESIDENT screen are in natural colors, and have
registration cards will be allowed to (All Men Vote) been described as "showing to a per-
ballot upon all offices except those of [ ] ALBERT ADAMS PRESIDENT feet fidelity marvelous colorings and
the Union, Stundent Council, and Stu- [ ] WILLIAM L. DIENER delicate harmony." They are radicai-
dent Christian association. Registra- [ ] RICHARD L. LAWRENCE [ ] JOHN 11. ELLIOTT ly different from the ordinary moving
tion Friday and Saturday was heavier [ , hARRY G. MESSER [ I GEORGE F. HACKER picutre and the travelogue film." Pro-
than in any previous years, it was re- [ ] JAMES E. NEWTON [ ] RENSIS LIKLRT fessor Sandoz comes to Ann Arbor,
ported by Irwin F. Deister, '25, chair- RECORI)ING SECRETARY Only those men who are in sym- from an extended tour that has taken
man of the Student Council elections pathy with the purposes of the St!- him to most of the larger cities in the
committee. Registration will again [ ] RICHARD E. BARTON dlent Christian Association should vote. United States and South America.
be held from 9 to 4 oclock tomorrow [ ] JAMES B. DEANE He is not handicapped in lecturing as
at the booths on the campus, and all EA VICEhe is proficient in five languages.
students who intend to vote Wednes- LThe lecturer will specialize on the
day are urged to register tomorrow, (Vote only for your department) ICruins of antiquity found in Old Egyptj
as this will be the final opportunity. [ ] PAUL W. BRUSKEĀ°I and India.
In case changes of names as they [ ] ROY 11. CALLAhAN Association
appear in the ballot in todays Daily [ I] GWYN M. HUGHES Co Add Two To Unio
are desired, telephone Deister, 5717. [ ] EDWIN C. MACK (Entire Campus Vote) }
as the ballot which will be used in the PRESIDEaTo
elections will be the same as the one ENGINEERING VICE PRES.EElection B a lo t
appearing in The Daily. Petitions for OHN M DUNNING [ ] WILLIAM C. DIXON
junior and senior councilmen candi- [ ] ARRY AWKINS ELMER H. SALZMAN Two more names were added to the
lates must be sent to Alfred B. Con- ]RENSIS LIKERT VICE PRESIDENT I nominees for Union elections yester-
nable, 25, 1912 Geddes Ave., before'I day, when the petition of Albert B.
tomorrow noon to be considered. Ten LAW VICE PRES. [ ] ELIZABETH VAN . VALKEN- Adams, ',27L, for president and Niel
per cent of the enrollment of each BURGH H. Smith, '26L, for law vice-president
college on the campus is necessary to [ ] BERT' R. ISELL [ ] FRANK P. WEAVER1 were accepted. Their names will ap-
petition. Petitions for the president 7 NE.BLEIh SRA SECRETARY Ipear on the ballots on Wednesday,
of the Student Council can not be May73]. NOBLE TRAVISEMay 13
made. (MEDIC VICE PRES, [ ] DOROTHY I. CLINE
R RE ] MARGUERITE V. DUTTON
[ WOBERB . COER [ ] MIRIAM M. OLDEN Unusual Grand
PP T11I NEI) VICE PRES. E ] LEWIS F. MERKEL First A nnual
IIHIIIIFuI flIIShTuII V F [ EUGENE K. BUCK [ ] ROBERT S. MILLERt

Wolverines, 'Wearied and Over-Con-
iident, Unable to Hit DIrnlnutive
Left Hander
Madison, Wis., May 9.-Michigan's
championship-seeking baseball team
received a severe jolt here today,
when the lowly Badgers defeated the
Wolverines, 11-2.
The Wolverines appeared consider-
ably slowed up, due to their long
trips during the last two days, and the
Badgers encountered no difficulty in
revenging themselves for the 8-0 de-
feat which they suffered at the hands
of Coach Fisher's men last Monday.
Wisconsin exhibited remarkable
prowess with their bats, touching up
three Michigan pitchers, Jablonowski,
Benson, and Fisher, for 15 safe hits.
Jablonowski, Conference veteran, fell
before a series of blows before the
game had gone past the fifth inning.
In the third, Edwards land Larson of
Wisconsin. thrilled the crowd with a
pair of home runs, which came in suc-
cession.
Michigan managed to get to Clan
sen, the left hander who fell before
their terrific onslaught at Ferry field
last Monday, for only six hits which
he kept widely scattered.
The score: R. H. E.
W isconsin .................11 15 01
Michigan ..................2 6 6
Batteries-Wisconsin, Clausen and
Barnum; Michigan, Jablonowski, Ben-
son, Fisher and Cherry.
GERMANS FEAR
INA UGURA TION
DAY VIOLENCE
Berlin, May 9. (By A. P.)-Even if
the most rigid police control is exer-
cised on Monday when president-
elect Von Hindenburg returns to Ber-
lin for his inauguration the next day,
more than one violent partisan flag
would seem to be inevitable.
The latest official announcement
says; "it is known that a number of
organizations intend to line the
route of the Reich president entry on
May 11, armed with weapons" and
the police consequently have issued
instructions that all clubs, fraterni-
ties or associations gathering on the
line of march with either displayed or
concealed weapons, immediately are
to be debarred from participation In
the welcoming ceremonies.:
When the field marshall arrives in
Berlin he will be engulfed in a veri-
table ocean, of monarchists colors.
Large streamers in the conservative
journal today urged the display of
flags on Monday and Tuesday, stat-
ing "it is self evident that all who in
his honor displayed flags during the
campaign and after the victory of the
election, should now greet him anew
with the glorious black, white and
red banners."

Northrup Is High Point Scorer,
Taking One First, One Tie
for First, and Second
By William H. Stoneman
Scoring twice as many firsts as
their opponents, Michigan's track
team decisively defeated Ohio State,
84-51, yesterday afternoon on Ferry
field. Nine times through the course
of the afternoon records were estab-
lished and one other was tied. It was
the greatest record smashing carni-
val ever staged on Ferry field and
each team had five of the remarkable
performances to its credit.
DeHart Hubbard proved to be the
star of the day when he tied the
World's record of 9 3-5 seconds in
the 100 yard dash and leaped 25 feet
1-2 inch in the broad jump. Phil
Northrup was the Michigan high
point scorer of the day with one first,
a tie for first, and a second place to
his credit and his performance in the
javelin throw, 192 feet 4 1-2 inches,
was the best that had ever been made
in an Ohio-Michigan dual meet.
Other record breaking performances
were made in the shot put, the '120
yard higlh hurdles, the two mile 'run,
the hammer throw, the half mile, and
the mile run. The 220 yard hurdle
record for the dual meet was tied.
The entire meet ran off with few
upsets and was well contested in
practically every event, Michigan
scored one slam, in the discus throw,
took nine firsts, had two men tie for
first in another event, took eight
second places, and sevn third places.
Ohio's great pair of Olympic hurdlers,
Larry Snyder aid Phil Guthrie, suc-
ceeded in taking first and second in
two evnts. Michigan took the first
two places in six of the events.
Hubbard ing 100Y ard Dash
The meet started off pretentiously,
records falling in the first three
events. In the 100 yard dash, Hub-
bard got the jump on the opposition
and led all of the way, Wittman com-
ing in two yards behind him. Hub-
bard's time of 9 3-5 seconds is the
best he has ever made, and set new
records for Ferry Field and the an-
nual dual meet. In tying the world's
record with the wind blowing across
the track, Hubbard attained a life-
long ambition. Wittman beat Irwin
of Ohio by a good margin and ran
the distance in well under 10 seconds
himself.
The mile run saw Arnold of Ohio
leaving the Michigan runners well in
the rear on the hogIe stretc. His
time of 4 minutes 23 3-5 seconds was
almost six seconds better thmn the
former meet record made at Colum-
bus in 1923 by Jack Bowen. Horn-
berger was a good second, and Briggs
came in close behind him for a third.
Jung, who had been running third
until the end of the second lap, was
tripped and forced to drop out when
Black of Ohio tried to pass him on
the southwest turn.
Munz Takes Shot Put
Michigan's total grew eight more
points when Chuck Munz and Dick
IDoyle came through with a first and
second in the shot put. The winning
toss was 45 feet 41-2 inches, the best
that the former Navy star has done
for Michigan in competitionband a
new meet record. Doyle's best at-
tempt was 42 feet 11 1-2 inches, four
feet farther than Murphy's best.
The 220 yard dash also gave Michi-
gan a goodly number of points. Lea
Wittman, who had run Hubbard a
close race a few minutes before, beat
Irwin of Ohio by four yards in 21 4-5
seconds, close to record time for the
event. Voelker of Michigan was run-
ning second until Irwin passed him
five yards from the finish.
Ohio Hurdlers Star
Snyder and Guthrie lived up to all
expectations when they ran first and
second in the high hurdles, Walk of
Michigan finishing a good third.
Record time was only prevented by
the fact that both of the Buckeye's
tripped over hurdles.

Nate Feinsinger ran a beautiful
race to win the quarter mile and Bill
Herrnstein ran the best race of his
career to finish second. Feinsinger
won the race in 50 1-5 seconds,

New York, May 9. (By A. P.)--
Paavo Nurmi, remarkable athlete
from Finland, stands exonorated of
all charges that he had stepped off
the path of amateurism during his
running in this country. Hugo Quist,
manager of Nurmi's American tour
and Willie Ritola, Finnish distance
man also h ve been cleared.
A commit eeo f the Amateur Ath-
letic union today cleared the men in
a statement which went as far as to
censure Kenneth L. Wilson, athletic
director of Drake university, who had
brought charges that excessive ex-
pense money was demanded for their
' appearance in the Drake relays at
Des Moines two weeks ago.

i L
[ r

]
]

i! V U L1! r 11 i . 1 V1
BURTON A. GROFF
E. ROMLEY ROMINE

1-

i

I'

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT

[C
[

]1

WILLIAM T. COLMAN
KENNETH C. KELLAR

AOL#

By James A. Sprowl
" Featured by a grand march dis-
Board in Control of tinctly different from those of prev-
E ious campus formals, The First An-
Athletics nual Band Promenade, given last
night in Granger's hall, secured for,
(Entire Campus Vote) itself a permanent position on the l
campus social calendar. This event
(Vote for three oni3') was attended by more than 160
Nominations to be made Monday. couples, including every member ofi
the Varsity band; since only guests
who received written invitations
" were allowed to attend, the number
Board in Control ofI of couples was small enough to make
I dancing comfortable. I
Student Publications When the time came for the grand I
march, the drums began to roll slow-
(Entire Campus Vote) ly, gradually increasing their inten-
(Vtfrthe nysity; then the two trumpeters of the
efort only)Varsity band advanced with Capes'
[ ] WILLIAM L. DIENER thrown back to play the Michigan
[ ] JOSEPH E. GANDY bugle call. As Max Seeley's Pastime
[ ] JOHN G. GARLINGHOUSE Players swung into the "Victors." I
,[ ] LUCIAN LANE Robert A. Burhans, '28M, and Miss i

larch Features
Band Promenade
ing; Russell Schofield, the dancing
banjo player, did a little entertaining
of his own.
Small booklet programs, fashioned
from maize block-M's, bordered in
blue, were given as favors to the
guests.
SBesides Burhans, Robert V. Halsey,
'25, and Ward L. Chadwick, '26M,
were on the committee in charge of
arrangements.
As a special feature, the orchestra
played "Co-eds of Michigan," the
new waltz written for the University
by John Philip Sousa, during one ofl
the dances.
Baseball
Scores
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston 4. Detroit 5.

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(ATOte for three only)

[
[
[7
17
[7
17
[7
C7
'C
C

7
1
J
.1

ALLIN B. CROUCH
LEE W. ENSEL
JOHN L. GOW
EBEN M. GRAVES
LUCIAN LANE
CHARLES D. LIVINGSTONE
CHARLES G. OAKMAN
L. BEAUMONT PARKS
JOHN P. ROWE

. ._
a
1
t
c
ii

SECOND ALL-MICHIGAN
FAMILY IS DISCOVERED

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