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May 05, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-05

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PAk~n rouR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TYM~SDAT, MA'S' , 93

Published every ,morning except Monday
during the Wniversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Memberi of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The A' sociated' Press is exclusively en-
titied to the use for republication of all news
dispatcheshcredited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
fished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postsa granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
;4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; busl-
ness, 96o.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4825
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
Editor.............John G. Garilughouse
News Editor. ,.......... Robert G. Ramsay
City Editor...........Manning Houseworth
Night Editors
George W. Davis Harold A. Moore
omas .Henry Fi edk. K.' Sparrow, Jr.
Kenneth L. Keller Norman R. Thal
Edwin C. Mack.
Sports Editor.,......William H. Stoneman
Sunday Editcr..........Robert S. Mansfield
Women's Lditor .............Vrrena Moran
Telegraph Editor......William J. Walthour
Assistants

turn of the whole world to conservat- thing that our laws and constitution,
ism during the past year or so, in- have from time immemorial held
cluding the political victories over the sacred to every American citizen.
radicals in the United States, Great Unions have been enjoined from pay-
Britain, France, and Germany, has, no ing strike benefits, from making any
doubt, somewhat depressed the spirits reference to a difference between
of the Soviet leaders until they must their employers and themselves, either
be ready to play their last card in a in their own publications or in their
desperate attempt to win their game. meetings, from circulating any state-
Dispatches from Berlin intimate ment even though true, that the em-}
that Gregory Zinoviev, who has rap- ployer is unfair to labor, from even
idly been fading from the public view, printing a true statement of a court
is trying to come back on his platform trial, from making any attempt to or-j
of world revolution. Even President; ganize without the permission of their
Kalinin announced in a recent speech employer and from doing any number
in Moscow that "all the workers of the of things that other classes of Amer-1
world had to do was to unite." ThIe ican citizens are every day allowed toj
simplicity of this statement is re- ( do. In practically every one of the
markable, but putting it into effect is above cases the higher court on ap-
slightly more difficult, as was evi- = peal held that the injunction should
denced when the Communists tried to not have been granted, but by that
order the socialists of Berlin to unite time the purpose of the injunction
with them. Their efforts were useless. proceedings has been accomplished
The wonder is that Russia contin- and the union broken. However, not-
ues to put up with the Soviet govern- withstanding the final decision in
ment. Since the United States has these cases, courts continue to grant1
shown no signs of recognizing the injunctions in exactly the same sit-
Soviets, Germany has elected their uations when they come up later. The,
worst possible enemy, General von Clayton act specificly gives to the
Hindenburg, and the Communiste unions the right to organize and to
agents have made a mess of things in carry on certain activities, but time
Bulgaria, their power seems to be rap- and time again the courts have temp-
idly diminishing. If the day ever orarily restrained the unions from
comes when the Russian peasants rise exercising this privilege, until the
up against them, more tombs less purpose of the employer has been ac-
elaborate than that of Lenine will be complished. It would not be surpris-
needed in a hurry. ing under these conditions, if labor?
would have a certain contempt for
CHARLES FOSTER KENT the courts, especially in view of the
Throughout the ages there have fact that where the same facts
been idealists whose pronouncements come up with the union as the party
have shown them to be ahead of their asking for the injunction there is not
time. They have not always been a case on record where it has been
heeded to by their contemporaries. It granted. However I have yet to find
has been, however, their unceasing a single case in which the authorized

AND
DRAMA

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TONIGHT: "The Last Laugh in Hil
luditoriuni at o'clock.
TONIGHT: "The Passing Show" in
the Whitney theatre at S:15 o'clock.
* * *
ROBERT BENCHLEY SAYS-
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University organ-
ist, will present the following pro-
gram tomorrow afternoon in Hill
auditorium at 4:15 o'clock:
Gothic Suite .............Boellmann
1. Choral
2. Menuet GothiqueI
3. Priere a Notre Dame
4. Toccata
Andante Cantabile (from string
quartette, Op. 11)..TschaikowskyI
Scherzo Caprice .............. Ward
Liebestraum ................ ..Liszt
Finale (Symphony I)......... Vierne!
(. . . Eli! Eli! why doesn't he put
the Stravinsky on his program!)
* * *
AN) GILBERT SELDES SAYS-
BARRE H4ILL'S RECITAL I
Barre Hill, a pupil of Theodore Har-
rison, and for the last two years one
of the leading men in the Michigan
Union Opera, will present a vocal re-
cital tomorrow evening at eight
o'clock in the University School of
Music. His program will include the
following numbers:
I.
Sebben, crudelo ............ Caldara
Lasciatemi Morire !........ .Monteverde
Nelcor frui non Mi Sento.... Paisielli
All acquisto di gloria...... Scarlatti
IT.

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What Will Ten Days at
Camp Mean to Them?
Michigan Students sent 480 last
summer. 500 can be accommodated.
this year
"A DOLLAR A DAY
LET'S A CITY KID PLAY"
WEAR A TAG
Contributed by Graham's Stores

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Gertrude Bailey Marion Meyer
Louise Barley Helen Morrow
Marion Barlow Carl E. Obbuacher
Leslie S. Bennetts Irwin A. Olian
Smith H. Cady, Jr. W. Calvin Patterson
Stanley C. Crighton Margaret Parker
Willard B. Crosby Stanford N. Phelps
Valentine L. Davies Helen S. Ramsay
Robert T. DeVore Marie Reed
Marguerite Dutton L. Noble Robinson
Paul A. Elliott Simon F. Rosenbaum
Geneva Ewing Ruth Rosenthal
James W. Fernambers Frederick H. Shillito
Katherine Fitch Wilton A. Simpson
Joseph 'O. Gartner Janet Sinclair
Leonard Hall David C. Voked
Elizabeth .& Kennedy Lilias K. Wagner
Thomas V. Koykka Marion Walker
Mariod Kubik Chandler Whipple
Elizabeth Liebermann
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSER
Advertising.................-..-9. L. Dunne
Advertising .................... R. C. Winter
Advertising.....-........,..H. A. Marks
Advertising.............. B. W. Parke
Accounts..................H.M. Rockwell
Circulation....................John Conlin
Publication............- .....R. D. Martir
Assistants
P. W. Arnold K. F. Mast
W. F. Ardussi F. E. Mosher
I. M. Alving H. L. Newmiann
W. C. Bauer T. D. Olinstead
Irving Berman R M. Prentiss
Rudolph Bostelman W. C. Pusch
George P. Bugbee F. 3.Rauner
I F. lark E. Sandberg
. C. Consroe F. K. Schoenfeld
F. R. Dentg R. A. Sorge
George C. Johnson A. S. Simons
0. A. Jose, Jr. M. M. Smith
K. K. Klein I J. Wineman
W. L. Mullins
TUESDAY, MAY 5, 1925

t"
We Also do
High Class Work in
CLEANING ANE RtEBLOCKING
HATS
of all Kinds
FACTORY HAT STORE I
617 Packard St. Phone 7415
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
"Mit.
1 f u~I N islats - - - 50C to $2.5o
A Y Wed. Mat. - 50C to $1.50;
Sat. Mat. - - SOc to $2.00
Th :Miracle Play o America
f ANNE NICHOLS*
"lAble's Irish Rose"
S SLEEP ANY WHERE BUT
EAT AT REXS
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Sts.

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Thne
GREEN TREE INN
Special Parties by Arrangement
Luncheon, '12:00-1 :30
Afternoon Tea, 3:00-5:00
Dinner, 5:30-7:00
Buy your tickets for Peter Pan from
the Woman's League
205 South State

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Night Editor-GEORGE W. DAVIS
THE ENDOWMENT
Many have been the suggestions
concerning a memorial to the late
President Marion LeRoy Burton.
None could be more fitting than the
establishment of an endowment fundI
which was announced yesterday. .It
will serve the double purpose of hon-
oring the accomplishments of a greatj
man and fulfilling a long felt need of
the Universtiy.C
The amount already raised, some-]
thing over $100,000, should serve as a
nucleus for a huge sum the interest
of which can be used many years in
the future by the Regents to further
the special interests of the institution
not cared for by annual appropria-
tions. President Burton considered
such an endowment essential to the1
progress of the University. The donors
pay a tribute to his vision by their
gift.
THE UNIVERSITY'S RESPON-
SIBILITY

activity which has laid the foundations agent of the Federation has advised
for future reforms-for the freedom disregarding these injunctions which
which we enjoy today. obviously are illegal. On the other
Admittedly one of the greatest hand employers and manufacturers
problems of the day is religion. every day disregard such laws as thei
Though Christianity continues to in- Sherman anti-trust law, factory in- I
fluence millions of people, it has be- spection laws, workers compensation
come so confused with the dogma of acts, and yet we do not hear news-
the established churches that many paper editorials saying that organized
find it difficult to adhere to its formal industry believes in anarchy, and dis-
manifestatiohs. Consequently there regard of law.
has grown up a movement to interest The great majority of unions try by
students in the study of religions with every means in their power to preventf
a view to aiding them to form their j industrial chaos, through conference,
own spiritual conceptions. and discussion, and it is a notable
This was first given material ex- fact that where employers consent tol
pression through the work of the late such discussion strikes do not occur.f
Chares Foster Kent, professor of se- In the clothing industry the unions
mestic" languages and Biblical litera- have had a form of closed shop agree-
ture at Yale university, who died Sun- ment with the manufacturers, and
day at New Haven. The Michigan there has not been a strike for fifteen
School of Religion, intended to form years, although many disputes have
the nucleus for such work in other arisen, and some settled adversely to
state universities of the country, is labor, the agreements being reached
the result of three years of his effort. entirely without outside help. This
It is still in the experirpental stage; would seem to refute The Daily's
its existence is hardly known. But statement that the union idea of a,
whether or not it proves a success, conference "Is a discussion monopo-
the conception will stand as a monu- lized by labor." It is a recognized
ment to an idealist--a man who re- I fact that in every industrial crisis it
alized the necessity for an enlightened is the employers that are the most re-
religion in this age. I luctant to discuss the situation, and
when they do an agreement is almost
If you don't buy a tag for the S. C. always reached that is fair to both
!A. camp fund, someone will tag yoI sides. This has been particularly
around all day .trying to tag you. true in the mining strikes, in which it
has been practically impossible to get
You can't curse the operator now the owners to discuss the matter, be-
when you don't get your party, be- l cause when they have, the impartial
cause YOU ARE IT. government commissions have almost
always rendered decisions which show
that the owners are not treating their
CAMPUS OPINION workers fairly.
Anonymous commnications will be It perhaps should be true that "Few!
disregarded. The namnes of comumuni- i
.ants will. however, be regarded asi persons except a few extortionists
confidential upon request. wish to oppress labor" as your ed-
AN OPEN LETTER itorial says, but the facts have not
proved this. If this were true why
To the Editor: I should so many states find it neces-
Your editorial on the Iluggins-Wil- i sary to enact minimum wage, Laws,
son debate in Friday's paper, repre- which by the way are opposed by or-
s ents in a fairly typical manner the: hc ytewyaeopsdb r
iewtsintof thavreryad mnnormte ganized labor? If this were true what
viewpoint of the averaged uninformedneed would there by for a Child labor

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Psyche .................... Paladilke
Les Roses D'Ispahan .........Faure
Ariette . . ................. Vidal
III.
Pastorale Variations . ....Mozart
Reflets dans l'eau........... Debussy
Dwight Steere
IV.j
Mondnachet .............. Schumann
Ich hab 'im Traum geweinet ....
.Schumann
Standchen .................. Brahms
Der Tod, das ist die kukle
Nacht .................. Brahms
Botschaft ................... Brahms
V.
The Crystal Gazer ..........Kramer
Little Bateese ...............Pierce
Memory ..................Densmore
The Great Awakening....... Kramer
* * S
ANT) 3ORDAUTN HALL SAYS-

LUXENBERG
CLOTHES FOR THE COLLEGE MAN
The
SACK, SUIT
(Two and three button)
CUT with that conserv.
atism carefully dressed men
demand, and tailored in ap-
propriate, rich patterns
that stamp them as dis-
tinctive.
$3250 to $4250
NAT LUXENBERG & BROS.
841 BROADWAY, NEW YORK
Next showing at Campus Bootery4
304 S. State Street
May 7 and 8
Our style memo. book sent re on reques

1

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'National Music Week
Celebrate It with
Come in and hear your favorite music on Victor Records.
A Victrola will lring into your home the world's greatest
music, by its most famous artists, any time. The Victor Rec-
ord Catalog contains a choice of 18,000 selections in every
field of music from grand opera to Jazz.
SCIAEELE & SON
MUSIC HOUSE
110 S. MAIN ST.

mm

COMEDY CLUB TRYOUTS
The annual spring tryouts for mem-
bership in Comedy Club will be held
Monday, May 11, in Newberry hall at
two-thirty o'clock. These tryouts are
open to all University students, and
applicants are expected to offer a
recitation lasting about three minutes,
preferably memorized and preferably
from some play.
AND ROBERT ShE IIWODD SAYS-
TIlE FRENCH PLAY
Eugene Brieux's "Blanchette" has
been selected as the nineteenth annual
French play' to be presentedl Wednes-
day evening, lay 6, in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall at eight-fifteen -o'clock.
The Cercle Francais is one of the
oldest organizations on the' campus,
having been established since 1902
and inaugurating the tradition of the

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A development of the past decade college student on organized labor. It
has been an increased interest in the is not to be wondered that so many
guidance of boys during their critical, persons have this attitude, because
formative period. Business and- pro- they get most of their ideas from the
fessional men, clergymen, in fact all newspapers which print matter per-
adults have come to realize the im- taining to the unions only when some
portance of insuring a good citizen- violence is committed by a spy of the
ship for the future. employers planted to discredit the
The best known manifestation of unions, or by some misguided member
this activity is the annual Interna- of the unions themselves. When
tional Boys' week during which boys' unions arej perfectly peaceful, and do-
athletics, industry, and government ing everything in their power to avert
are studied and emphasized. Another industrial warfare we hear nothing
feature which has been given less about them in our capitalistic press,
publicity but which is closely allied but the moment a single stone is
is the aid given to underprivileged thrown, or a single memb>er of a1
children. Through the medium of union raises his voice in protest
playground work in the large centers against an illegal injunction, or un-1
of, population and the establishment of fairness on the part of his employer,
"fresh air camps," youth is given an we are immediately deluged with art-
even chance to develop normally. icles in our press concerning the law-
It is this latter phase of boys' work lessness of the American Federation
that University students support The of Labor, although every union offi-
University Fresh Air Camp at Patter- cial spemds a large part of his time
son lake has for several years given counseling against any form of
healthy recreation and leadership to violence, or disregard of law.
hundreds of boys from Michigan in- It is interesting to note the twist
dustrial centers. If it is to continue that your editorial writer gave to thel
to function it must be given adequate statement by Judge Huggins on the
support attitude of Samuel Gomnipers toward
law. Even as Huggins quoted Gom-
pers he did not say that he regarded
MORE TOMBS unions above the law, but that hel
Now that May Day, the appointed thought that law making bodies'
time for a world-wide demonstration should not pass laws to regulate the
of the power of the Communist Inter- activities of unions. He did not say
national, has passed in comparative that organized labor should not obey

I

amendment, workers' compensation annual play in 1907. Among its reper-
acts, and eight hour laws? Judge tory are included seven plays by Mo-
Gary possibly did not desire to op- liere, two by Sardou, and others by
press labor by his twelve hour day Rostand, Pailleron, Bernstein, Labiche
and twenty-four hour shift every two et Martin, Flers et C'aillavet, Regnard,
weeks, but he certainly was not ad- Brueys et Palaprat, Erkmann-Char-
verse to taking the profits which ac- trian, and Scribe et Legouve-most of
crued from this profitable system, un- them comedies.
til every public agency that investi- Because of "this, "Blanchette," one
gated conditions reported that such a of Brieux's earlier realistic problem
system meant death to his workers, plays, is in the nature of a frank ex-
and it was only when public opinion periment. The production is under,
organized by the efforts of the unions, the direction of Robert V. Finney, in-
was entirely against him that he con- structor in the Romance Language de -
sented to the change that time has partment, assisted by Professor Her-
proved was possible for twenty years bert A. Kenyon.
before. Seats for the performance are now
It is of course true that labor has on sale; at the three State street boor-
often had poor and ill advised leader- stores.
p vis er--H. W. K.
ship, but the root of this lies with the
employers themselves in not allowing AND EVEN THE )IAI)AME TINEE
the unions to select persons outside SAYS-
the local organization who are equip-
ped to deal with the problems, to rep-j "THE PASSING SHOW"
resent them, instead of forcing the The Shuberts are presenting their
union to select some man with little uneditioned version of "The Passing
or no education, who is either in fear Show" this evening at the Whitney
of losing his job, or disgruntled be- theatre. According to their press-
cause of losing it, to act as the localI agents it is a composite of the best
leader, and it is to these men that acts taken from their various produc-
'practically all the excesses that or- and is now on its way toward a
ganized labor has been guilty of are world tour. The numbers include the
due to. If manufacturers and em-~;several satires on current Broadway
ployers would awake to the fact that successes and a similar number of
organized labor is here to stay, just such spectacular features as the in-
as much as Manufacturers associa- famous "Living Chandaliers"-fruit

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The magic o
make -b elieve
GIVE a boy a toy pistol, and
first thing you know he is
playing robber-with a handker-
chief for a mask.
Equip him with a Corona Type-
writer, and just as readily he acts
the part of business man or
author.
Play is real life to a child - and
that is why parents should pro-
vide playthings that start right
habits of mind and body.
Every home should own a Corona, and
every child should learn to use it as early
as possible. With Corona a child will
teach himself to read, spell, punctuate,
and co-ordinate mind and muscle. If he
has a talent for writing, Coronawill help
bring it out. And just incidentally, the
grown-ups wil appreciate Corona quite
as much as the youngsters.
Corona Four costs only $60. Easy
terms if desired. Call or phone for
demonstrations.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

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IA O E B Y E DE RH E I MER S TE IN C OM PANTY
CLOTHES
FOR ANY OCCASION .
I- -
'The suits that are tailored .
for us by Ederheimer Stein -
Company are such that make
the wearer feel "dressed up"
I- -
on any occasion and in any >
company. And they are suits -
that fit the occasion in make,
in quality and price.,-
We can't refrain from mak-
ing some special mention of
FITFORM trousers. They
are absolutely the most per- /
fect fitting trouser to be ob-
tained in any make of
I clothes.
-
Just received - a large shipment of Flannel Trousers
in many distinctive patterns.
HATS AND FURNISHINGS
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