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April 03, 1925 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-04-03

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FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1925

1JAAIiJ, 25*THE ,MICHIGAN DAILY- PAGE °^ l

TO EXHIBI1T "8IA9D
RAPIDSART WORK
I'abta~ngs, TLaidseapes; Miiiatures
SIVUI Be Displayed in Al'umiiu
Neniorial Hall
WILL OPEN MONDAY
Flw'e, r paintings, landscapes and
iiiniaturca, the work of four Grand
Rapilds artists, will be exhibited in the
West gallery of Alumni Memorial hal
beginning MoTnday, April 5. The col-
ledtion is coming here under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor Art assoc-
iation, and will remain through April
The artists represented in the 'ex-
hibition are-Miss Helen E. Moseley,
Miss Blanche McMullen, Miss Helen*
Steketee and Mrs. Paul Fredrick
Steketee.
Miss Moseley's chief interest is ire
landscape painting. Her work in that
field has attracted favorable comment
in recent exhibitions, particularly in
Chicago. Miss Moseley studied under
Hugh Breckenridge -and Charles W.
Hawthorne at Gloucester, Mass., and
lhas spent some 'time at the Cape 'Cod
colony near Provincetown.
"Water, colors comprise Miss Mc-
Mu~len's principal 'Interest. Her
work is particularly commanding for
the effective use of pure water color.
The carving of ivory miiniatures is
an additional pursuit of the artist,
and several of her carved pieces will
be~ included in the exhibit.
7Mrs.%Steketee's work is said to have
been profoundly influenced bya brief
association in California with H-ovsep
Pushmnan, the Armenian colorist. She
studied at the Cincinnati Museum of
Art, as we~ll as 'at Indianapolis, and
has exhibited at both places. Mrs.I
'Steke'tee, 'also ,-known for her land -
capes, displays decided talent in her
flower studies, recognized by their
delicacy of design and color.
v Tbe exhibit will be open to the
public each 'afternoon from 1:30 tor
5~ o'clock on week days, 2 to 5 o'clock
Sunday,, and from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock
Thursday night. Students in, the Uni-
versit'y and in thlie Ann Arbor pubflcs:
schools are admtted fre'e of clta'ge.
MEETINSS FILL OAY
nr CTATr AiPinii

ery," by GeorgeIE. Bigge; "An 'anal-
ysis of the industrial relations con-
troversy," by J. F. Shreiner; "The
Secondl Industrial Conference and Or",
settlement .of ibo)r disputes," by S.
M. Levin.
iI islory, IPoljiil Scenpice
The section of history andl political
science will li eet at 10 'clckl in
room 10(09, Angell ball. The follow-
ing papers wlii he lpresented : "A re-
classification of wairs.'' by Preston
Sloss(,n ; "The ordinance making
p)ouers of the French plresident," b~y
James Hart.
Psycliolo-a -
The section of l)sychology will meet
at 10 o'clock in room P162, Natural
folloews lding. The P5apers are as
'follws: Experimental work on maze
learning," by .1. F. Shepard; "Th'a use'
of the term 'dynamic' in psychological
literature," by C. E. Ragsdale; "The
relative dies iraibility of personality
traits in social situations," by C. S.
Yoakuim; "Preliminary study in rea-

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I

Whit more TreatsT
'The -Work Of Art'
In Fourth Paper

* The
( mrni o,

I think the review in, the Music and
Dramia column was terrible; I am
still indignant over it."
L~ouise. Barley, '25.-"The play en-
tdeavors to maintain too high -a ten-

sion, and therefore the first two acts
drag. I also agree in part with the
review in the Music and Drama col-
umnn; I believe large portions of the{
play are 'hokum,' anti its philosophy

of the after-life too theatricalI to be
sincere. The actin, howiever1, w«u
very good."
READ THRE CLASSIFIED ADS,,

I
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.C

soig IyE .Sag;"h 'i-ception of the relative movements of
two points of light," by H. R. May-
f berry.
Zoology Sections
The zoological section will meet at
9 o'clock in room 21355, Natural Sci-
ence 'building. The papers are as fol-'
lows: "Michigan's conservation fal-.
lacy," by A. G. Ruthiven; "The inland
lakes," by Paul S. Welch; "The
fishes," by C. L. Hubbs and Jan Met-
zellar; "The birds a nd mammals," byi
L. R. Dice-Symposium--Th~e Zoolog-
ical Resoure's' of Michigan.

I eiig thefinirtango-i t~lflllllltlllllllll1111ILIII~I~~i191 1119(IltlllilEl~llh 1Qitwork ofdl arC1Dt~llllt tlsa lo< , ' 4. A.JJ .4P.
tion of an experienice involving aes- --
Sthetic value and set apart within ,a (A C redo n~r1T~L
centain mediumz, Prof. Charles El. C: r L RGE DIXUII ONCER
Whitmore, Of thie rhetoric dep'a1-
imerit, yecterday continued his Sc'e od's question: What id you Ofesahighly esrbl=
' o leturs o asthtic inAngellI think of "Outward Bound," the Coin-f=-
hall. Th le topic for this discuss ion1 edy club production?I=
was "The, Work of zArt." "A genuine I ~-
w ork of art includes a development Wh ~lere asked: At the Wrhitney the- - OPPORTLI
or a differentiation." he stated; "the ;Ater.-- -
work of art is a transmitting device ! Te aiswers: Martin Code, Grad.,
and s ued fr apurose. -~ thnk: Outard oun' i thefin insales work of the highest order to Senior men who wash to make
Aesthetic values, Profe sor Whit- Iest production I have ever seen on,,=
mere declared, depend on the circumr- the Michigan campus-or ever hope to a permanent business connection.
stanco§ of the reccipient.- The recip-,isee. It was thoroughly professional d
ient's mind does not work all the in every sense." = TH(~IS g NO' cA Af!' A E ~
for t th she facts he m a bethem selvesa a, '2$ --Tol-t I.wCatherine:Fj l st niM f r aem acsrtem elv sfo - --"T he o O tat-Bou d'is=er a
l owing the line of reason, or using his weird, but I fairly lived the play. The COurepentiv wllb inhctyfr two dy onyintihe near
imazgination entirely. The values them- production seemed well cast to me, ftr oitriwtoeworpyt hsavrieet
selves seem at times to spring fro(=an lthuhthfuuetineve thswh rpytohsadriem t..
-mIadIthuh h final scene was ,:.
~the miedium in which they are. pre- I
sented rather than the original mast-IEinrerkable.the onceptinaft T heo=t
erriece :of the inventor. Exmnri~h nl al aet Reply by letter, giving name, address, age, telephone, personal refer --
Any definitioni of a literary value rfid.1 = ences, home town, and tell u.s WHY and HOW you expect to succeed q
which does not include the aesthetic e GdyBoner '27.-"I thought-levn
value is an inadequate theory, Pro- !teprorac f'Outward Bound' afterlevn college.-
fessor Whitmore claimed. Moreover, was remarkable, and the audience es- -.
over analysis of a literary iaster- pecially appreciative. The etnd"
piece nt olydettosonlyecan destroysy bauiflthecdetinechan-'11 too,1l11 was119l111veryIU111beautiful.91i13#illInciden1611tally, _________________________________________________________________
ical value, but causes eventually the
collapse of the aesthetic value.RE D T E L S t i D A S
REDTlECL TIE)ADNWYORK UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF RETIAILING
§ @ 0%1111111-% 'll:s"
Experience in NewfYoks, Newaks and Brooklyn's largest
deparmentstores. Earn while you train to be an executive. Store
'L'iiinlservice linked with classroom instruction.
Certificate..........M. S. in Retailing _______________________
mW R NFall term opens September 17, 1925. Suimmer School July 7 to 'seen Supremacy Signifiant In -its 4eanhig
a ylAuustrat4d 1925.e on application. For* further information write , 1iieeNGV PLAYING
YDou. ~Norris A. Brisco, Director, 100 Washington Square, New York 2:Simple4in1Its Grindeu
' -D efiant Iq Its Magnitude
Clothes
-SAn Inspirationrto All Humanity
M at our 9Jor Youlng Ay//lenG
Ou fThere is nothing like a-
~s aleSTETSON
vs fiS a"iCT ,s'', ~ r~~4r.,

r
ii

,,

Don'rP

Price

ft

Easter

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4x

Get thei

Gointg
Busin

(Continued from ate One)
towards _the soil, wo~ds, and birds.
"Thoreau *as the +trU'e lover, and
Crevecoeur took his appare-nt deliglit
from the exalted feeling of the prop-
erty o'Wner," he said.
The ilogani or the sectional nmee
i g;today is as follows:
Botaniy Programl
The section of botany will meet atj
9 o'clock in room 207, Natural Sci-
ence building. The following papers
will be presented: "Jane Colden, a
pioneer in American botany," (to be
read by title) by H. H. Bartlett; "Al- j
lac of the Douglas lake region," by
,Alnfa B. Ackley; "The wild roses on
and near the shore in the Mackinac'.
region of Michigan," by Eileen W. lier-I
lanson; "The vegetation mf the region
of D~ouglas lake, Michigan," by Frank
C. Gates; "Meteorological data, Doug- j
las lake, Michigan," by Franzk C.
Gates; "Enlarged bases 'in the black
ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh) in Mci
Mihigan," by Fknk C. Gates and C. 0.
Erlanson; "An ecological study of
Smith's bog, Chboygan .county, ,
Michigan," by Edith Woollett, Dorisf
D(;an, anzd Helen Coburn; "Applica-f
tion of Gleason's formula to A Careif
asiocarpa association, an associationi
of few species," by Edith Woollett,
Doris Dean, and Helen Coburn; "~Tie
development of vegetation ini the PFor-'
cupine mountains of Michigan," by 14.
F. ,Darlington; "Can America producet
its own rubber?" (to be read by title)j
by Carl D. LaRue; "Morphology of3
the seed in Claytonia virginica," by
MF. Woodcock; "Notes on Indian
reuderals;" by L. A. Keyiidyer; "The
source of materials comiposing the
coral reefs on Oahu, Johniston, andl
W~ake islands; is it of plant or animial
origin?" by James 1. Pollock.
Etonon ics Prograjn
The economies section will meet at I
10 o'clock in the economics building;
and the papers are as follows: "The!
recent discount and open-market pol-
icy of the federal reserve system,'yby
RI. G. Rodkey; "The trend of bond
p~rices," by L. A. Morgan. The after-
noon session, will meet at 2 o'clcok
and the papers are as follows: "Coin-
.,ptition between labor and Machin-

-at

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4
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1

I

r

know the iimportance of
looking fit. Good ap-
pearance counts mi-.ch
in the game of life. The yoning
man who dresses with taste has
a difecided advantage.
But--it is surprising how little
thought the average man gives
to his hat. It is his crown, yet he
seems to stop dressing at the heck.
Be careful in your selection of
your headwear. When you buy a
hat, select a Stetson. Its style is
right, its quality means long wear.

One-h ird 0Off

One=Quarter Off

IJ-a1

We bought themc before we decided to go out of
business anid rent our store to the Kresge people.
Hart Schaffner & Marx had sent us the largest and
Finest selection of new acid stylish suits and topcoats evdr
brought to Ann Arbor.

l~ ~=

f

A
'V
/;

We must turn theme into mon~ey and wind
business in a hurry. It's lucky for you that we have
this sacrifice right at the beginning of the season.

up our,
to make

Easter Clothes for

Boys of All

A ges

Half Price

Onte-Third COff

One -Fourth Off

1

It"
GORDON an
ILQRO

T~his salt is" i great thing for mothers who take a
bride in their boys' appearance, but want tio save money,
too. Suits, ;CAPS, blouses;,' der 'ver; hosiery-evety-
thing now 'at a half, a third or a quarter off.
Men's Hats, Shirts,
TVies, Hosiery at

II

One-Third Off

One-Fourth O0ff

i.
i

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Christie Comedy I
"LOV' YEMANIA"

PANS'
SIN(

NEXT WEEK

-With-
JACKIE .COOGAN
As Partners :with Ma'x -Gli sb49'
Fromt the Story by
WI1LA RD MACK

t
CHEON -
GERS I
Feature
DWIN
It

THEODORE
ROBERTS
VIOLA
DANA

Kei cithI
GOO

CILDRED'S SPECIL MATINE 1E
FRIDAY, 2:,OQ AND 3:40
10c ALL SEATS 10Ct
Scre'en Supremacy Signaifieut In Its Me n-hi
You w'wiit have to play htockey Friday aftternoo~in)ttsee".Ji
)leredcth. I". Sh-h--- There Is, no school Fr~iayand itjst~ fo
niakle it more interesting -we are going to eater to you,'tome
on and clap) and yell to your heart's content 'ca use this piture
suare -sill" make you Flo it. And the grown-ups iII have to I11~
it on this day.
cdbWX4irTi V

IHere s your chance io get just about twice as many
of the new things,; you're going to need for spring and
summer because of the reduced prices.

Iai-

f

t

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