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March 11, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-03-11

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1925

Nk

Pul~ished every morning except Monday
during the Universi year by the Board in
Control of Student blications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
.Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwse
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4,00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; busi-
ness, 96o.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
Editor........--..--John G. Garlinghouse
News Editor.............Robert G. Ramsay
City Editor............Manning Houseworth
Night Editors
George W. Davis Harold A. Moore
Thomas P. Henry Fredk. K. Sparrow, Jr.
Kenneth C. Keller Norman R. Thal
Sports Editor.........William 17. Stoneman
Sunday Editor.........Rooert S. Mansfield
Women's Editor .............Vernea Moran
Music and Draima.....Robert B. Henderson
Telegraph Editor......William J. Walthour
Assistants
Louise Barley H elen S. Ramsay
Marion Barlow Regina Reichmann
Leslie S. Bennets Marie Reed
mlith Cady JIr. Edmnarie Sebrauder
Wlard B. (CrosbT Frederick H. Shillito
Valentine L. Davies C. Arthur Stevens
Lam'es W. "Fernamberg Ma ory Sweet
Jsph 0. Gartner Heriian Wise
amng Iousewortk Eugene H. Gutekunst
llizabeti. S. Kennedy Robert T. DeVore
Elizabeth Liebertnann itatiley C., Crighton
Winfield R. Line. Leonard C. Hall
Carl E. Ohlmacher ThomasKV. Koykka
Wiiliam C. Patterson tLillias K. Wagner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSER
Advertiing. -..... . L. Dunne
Adtvcrf is;ng......................... R. C. Winter
Adverti, i 71.................... .H. A. Marks
Advertki-................. .B. W. Parker
Accounts...................H. M. Rockwell
Circulatiou. .................John (Conlin
I'ultlicatioii...... .............R. D. Martin
Assistants
P. W. Arnold WV. L. Mullins
Y. 'F. Ardussi K. F, Mast
7. M. Alvinig II. L. Newmann
Irving Berman T. D. Olmstead
Rudolph Bostelman R. M. Prentiss
II. . Clark W. C. Pusch
J. C. Consroe J.D. Ryan
F. R. D~entz N. Rosenzweig
J. R. DePuy M. F. Sandberg
Ceorge C. Johnson M. L. Schiff
O. A. Jose.nJr. F. K. Schoenfeld
K. K. Klein I. J. Wineman

In view of these various trends it is tice, the creation of international pub-
difficult indeed to hold any brief for lie opinoin, the white slave problem,
those who would oppose any rea-on- and the settlement of international
able program for bringing the two na- disputes; "Pagan" questions all, but
tions closer together in their relations. worthy of Christian consideration.
E_--H. C. Armstrong, '26.
REMOVING IS TINCtl() NS
Why the "Scotch" should be cheaper
Michigan now has an Interfraternity in the United States than it is in GreatI
council. At the beginning of the year
counil. t te beinnig O the~ Britain is decidedly difficult to under-
the situation seemed hopeless. Yet in Itasdd
a period of a few months a new con-
stitution has been drawn up and
adopted which is a decided improve- Dean Hamilton left for New York
ment on the old, and a project is tug-Thursday for an extended trip. Go to
menton he od, nd J)1()Joct ., 113it girls!
der way which is certain to promote i
the best interests of the units forI
which the organization exists. We re- Theoore and Kermit Roosevelt are
fer to the proposed Interfraternitypg game hunt. Like
banquet, scheduled for April 1. father like son!
Such an event is only one of the
many things that the council can do
to promote the best relations between
fraternity groups and their members.
It will bring the old and new to- " "A
gether on a common basis, it will We
tend to relieve any vestige of distinc-
tion which now exists. It after all is
this trend toward which an associa- We see by the paper that The In-
tion of fraternities should work. The lander, still-born out of Whimsies, is
present administration of the council putting on a Familiar Essay contest,
is to be congratulated for this step in in which the entries will be judged
the right direction. by the great exponent of the genre,

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Christophrerimoi y. We iirown upon
ON TO WISCONSIN It.* *
With the departure of George E VM d icher, besides being the Great-
Little Michigan has lost an excellent s Familiar Essayist, and
coach and a real man. After serving xriting books called "Mince Pie" and
this university' for three years lie now "Plumt.Pudding" and "Religio Jour-
enters upon a new endeavor-that of nalistici," is the Biggest Sap that has
directing athletics at the University climbed to respectable literary fame

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA t
TONIGHT: "Juan de lias Vias" by
Don Juan Hartzenbush in Sarah tas-
well Angell hall at S:1 o'clock.
" ITHE 1"AhI-AWAY PRINCESS"
A subtle play by Suderman, a pret-
ty one by Oliphant Down, and one of
simple country life by Mrs. Havelock
Ellis, will comrise the first program
of the Play Production classes for
this semester. Each has a merit in
its way, and each manner is distinct
from that of the other two.
The titles, to be exact are "The
Far-Away Princess," "The Maker of
Dreams," and "The Subjection of
Kezia." All of them involve a pretty
moral, not too obvious, and not overly
much like a sermon. Aesop would
have said, two thousand years ago,
that Kezia was a clever person, after
all, and it is useless to try to rule a
woman. Aesop might also have said,
though it probably would never have
occurred to him, that a far-away prin-
cess is the most perfect princess of
all; but he left it for Suderman to ex-
pound the creed.
As for the maker of dreams, the
thought is familiar enough. Christians
for centuries have preached the doe-
trine that the best of everything is
found at home; that all things come
to he who waits; that adventures are
constantly about, though the keenest
witted often fail to see them.
"H1EI GOOSE IH A AS 11G4"
The following detailed cast has been
announced for Miss flonstelle's pro-
duction of "The Goose Hangs High"
by Lewis Beach, to be presented Fri-
day afternoon in the Whitney theatre:
Bernard Ingals.......Walter Sherwin
Eunice Ingals, his wife........
..........Mrs. Richard Mansfield
Noel Derby ........Edwin K. Wolfe
Leo Day ............ Adams T. Rice
Rhoda, the maid ....Dorothy Richey
Julia Murdoch......... Ruth Mason
Mrs. Bradley, the grandmother.
... Edna Acher Crawford
Hugh Ingals, the eldest son.....
.Manart KippenI
-

1 BOOKS - BOOKS - BOOKS BOOKS - BOOKS-

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of Wisconsin. Coach LAttle leaves anI
enviable record, much of the spirit
and success displayed by athletic
teams during his stay being due to his
efforts.
On the campus Coach Little leaves
a host of acquaintances who though
sorry to lose his friendship will beI
interested in his future successes. The
University as a whole will always
have a welcome for him and will ex-
pect that although his interests will
be centered upon the activities of an-
other university he will remember the
warm place he holds in the hearts of
Michigan students.
CAMPUS OPINION I
Anonymous communications will he
disregarded. The names of communi-
.ants will. however, he regarded as
confidential u1on request.
IS HARMONY "PAGAN?"
To the Editor:I
In Sunday's issue of The Daily

in our day. As proof we submit the
fact that Morley thinks this is a good'
way to praise Shakespeare's "King
Lear": i. e'. to. say he has never read
it and(Mo,,,s4 that therefore he can't
die iusc fPlen he gets sick he will
tQ.to himself I can't die I
i iftre4( King Lear.
* * * ,
S'ct that he spends pages and
pa cussing such metaphysica as
the delights of reading in bed, the de-
lights of smoking a corn-cob pipe, the
delights of drinking cider, and the de-
lights of reading Dickens' "Christmas
Stories" will hardly suffice to save
hin in our humble esteem. It is a
fundamental literary maxim that peo-
pie should not write unless they have
something to say; and the Familiar
Essayists, by definition, disregard this
rule entirely.
* * *
Postcard Recently Received
Dear Jase:
Have just seen "Plantation Days"

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Coninuing

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1925
Night Editor-F. K. SPARROW, JR.
LET'S BE FRIENDS
Ever since Japan rose to the status
of a leading power in the world, there
have been rumors of international
misunderstanding and prophecies of
war between her and the .United
States., Disguised under the deadly
phrase of "the Yellow Peril," all sorts
of propaganda and bogeyism has been
spread throughout both nations until
the great masses of common people in
both lands have come almost to be-
lieve that war between Japan and the
United States is inevitable.
Gradually, however, along with the
increasing education of the Japanese
leaders as well as their people, these
vague apprehensons have been grow-
ing more and more absurd. At no time
have the two -governments been more
disposed toward mutual friendship
and international cooperation than at
the present. The latest indication of!
this feeling of amity is the hope that
through friendly conversations be-
tween Tsuneo Matsuraira, the new
Japanese ambassador who is to arrive
in Washington today, and President
Coolidge, some effective means of put-
ting a final blanket on incendiary
propaganda in-both countries may be
brought about.
At least three matters of tremen-
dous importance, namely: the new Rus-
so-Japanese, treaties, the Japanese
land ownership bill discriminating
against Californians, and the proposed1
second Washington arms conference,
have arisen in the absence of a Jap-
anese ambassador and will probably
come up for discussion.
In the matter of the Russian treaty!
the United States will undoubtedly,
want to know if the pact involves any
military understanding with the So-
viet government while Japan is inter-
ested to know if the American govern-
ment is to recognize the Soviets. Quite
obviously, the Japanese are complete- I
lt justified in treating Californians as
they have treated the islanders in re-
gard to the holding of land by aliens.
In fact, it would be preposterous to
expect any more lenient treatment at
their hands. The Japanese govern-
ment has already erpressed itself as
favorin- a second arms conference
providing it be allowed to help deter-I
mine the agenda, another very reason-
able request.
Perhaps no better example of thel
Japanese willingness to cooperate1
with the United States could be cited
than her action in the recent interna-
tional opium conference. She came to;
that gathering with a well-defined
program for the eventual abolishment
of opium-sinoking based on her own
successful experiments in the island'
of Formosa where, during the pastI
I ,,rnt,+,rfn,,. si,,rq f lipn ,s.,nsI n t.. nd- . t

"J. W. M." wrote a very interesting with Twenty-five colored Keith stars
an 1v tc ltnnn(thrca tarT1

an tn octoroon torus at the Mva-
article on the League of Nations. Ii s h . Ih
ineetn,.eas t eytp-jestic Theatre. I haven't enjoyed
say interesting, because it very typi- anything so much in years. Don't
1 cally reflected the absolutely shallow miss this show. It's a great enter-
and unsubstantiated argument com- tainment.
mon to those who are ignorant of the As ever,
subject which they oppose. George.
"J. W. M." starts out his. dcnuncia * * *
tion 'of the League by believing that Affixed to the postcard was a little
his few "plain statements" would be paper slip to this effect:
backed up by a large majority of If you enjoyed
American citizens. Now it is rather "PLANTATION DAYS"
obvious from his omission of any Fill out this card and
grounds upon which le bases this be- address it to your best
lief, that he simply believes it because friend. Then band it to
it is what he likes to believe. And, one of the ushers and
unless "J. W. M." turns out to be quite E we will mail It for you.
an authority on national affairs, his * * *
personal likes are not likely to carry Dear Jason:
much weight. A most amusing and laughable in-
"The pagan, imperialistic League of cident transpired at the last meeting
Nations" is another statement whicht of my English literary class.
might cause quite a stir as a rhetor- It was this way. Our teacher had
ical figure, but, as an intelligent state- assigned us to read something from
ment of fact, I am afraid it would be the pen of Ben Jonson, an English
discounted even by outsanding op- I dramatist who lived quite a while ago.
ponents of the League. It is indeed It is of course hardly necessary to add
strange that an institution which has that there was another man by the
as its prime object the maintenance n 1 Samuel Johnson who lived
of peace and the fostering of inter- some time before whose name is pro-
national harmony should be branded nounced in the same way that the
as "pagan." If that be paganism, I above name (Jonson) is pronounced.
should be glad to learn just how we - Well it seems that our professor
are to interpret the Christian expres- had assigned us to read the works of
sion "Peace on earth, good will to- fJonson without telling us right out
ward men." what Jonson or Johnson he meant. It
Then too, does it not seem rather seems that one girl, not having the
paradoxical to brand as "imperialist- literary background of us others, read
ic" something which in the next the works of Samuel Johnson instead
breath is said to have "no real in: .- lien Jonson.
dependen influence?" There are 55 S& when the professor asked, "Did
nations in the L.eague at present and you read Ben Jonson for today?"
yet it is strange that no one of them The girl makes reply, "No I read'
seems to fear for its sovereignty be- Samuel Johnson thinking he was the
cause of that "imperialistic" ogre of man you were referring to."
which it is a part. Of course the Samuiel Johnson was
That "the issue is as dead as slavery redlly born about a hundred years be-
in this country" is a very illuminat- fore Ben Jonson.
ing surprise in view of the crowd- "God," I thought to myself, "How
drawing power of a public discussion -dumb."
of the subject. Also "dead is7sues" --zlebbhn

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Mrs. Richard )Iansfield
Ronald Murdoch . ... Tha.yer Roberts
Lois Ingals, the daughter....... I
.................Eleanor Martin
Bradley Ingals, the younger son..
.....................Lester Vail
Dagmar Carroll ........Ghilda Leary
Elliot Kimberly......Walter Young
The story of "The Goose Hangs
High" concerns the average college 1
younger generation-filled with intol-
erance, unthinking impertinence and
golden fizzes. It is a light comedy
that constantly verges to serious
climaxes, and most importantly, un-
like the usual successful play its third
act is the height of the tensity. Tech-
nically alone, the piece is masterful
and unusually adroit.
* * *
THE STUDENTS' IECITAL
The following program will be pre-
sented at the Students' Recital Thurs-
day evening, March 12, at eight o'clock
in the Recital hall of the University
School of Music:
Prelude and Fugue in A fiat
major .................... Bach
La Jongleuse ...........Moszkowski
Lucille Graham
Two Part Invention, E

BTremendous reductio
Memory Books

do not generally become the basis of
good arguments whenever they are Tho Friendship Fund 'drive appearsE
broached. No matter what tihe gather- to be off in a cloud of dust as the boys
ing, the League is about the easiest say. And yet, in spite of all The
subject imaginable upon which to Jaiily's startling streamers, many per-
start a rapid--fire discussion. An.d it!I sons still pause, to inquire Say what.
is also strange to see a "dead issue" is this Friendship drive, anyway?
arouse so much interest among in- * * *

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Brief Cases

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Felt Goods

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telligent men of affairs such as jiis-
tices of the Supreme Court, Proslient s
of the United States, Senators, Repre-
sentatives, Governors, andt Univer-
sity professors.
Evidently "J. W. M." was not inter-
ested enough to go to hear Raymond
Fosdick discuss the subject a fewi
weeks ago. If he had, he probably
would have been more hesitant in
malolntcr ciiels CA5,inf r ffo;sr - enn ,-,-fc_ -in

I'r(fessor Pawlowski, we are givens
to understand, is attacking the Drive I
A Tergo in all his classes--hinting ,
damlly that the starving Russians
don't really want any money, and that
it is in reality going to swell the cof- -
fer's of Connable afld Wagner and the
other campus promoters of the pro-n
Ject.
Anybody with Wagner's salary

minor .................... Bach
Impromptu, A fiat...........Schubert
John St. Peter
Mondenacht...............Schumann
Der Nussbaum. .......... Schumann
Willard Spanagel
Prelude............... Jack Conklin
The Brook............ .Jack Conklin
Jack Conklin

Special Offers Each Day

"BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK"

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