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March 10, 1925 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-03-10

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DO

YOUR

BIT

FOR

THE

STUDENT

FRIENDSHIP

FUND

HELP
THE RUSSIAN
STIUDENTS

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXV. No. 118

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1925

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

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FOLLETTE GROUP
DEMOTED1 SENATE
APPROVESPOUSTER
DECISIVE VOTE ENDS. LONG
DEBATE; DEMOCRATS
LOOK ON
LADD IS REMOVED
Republicanis Plan to Press For Con-
firmation of Warren Nom-
ination Tomorrow
Washington, D. C., March 9.-(By
A. P.).-Formal approval of the de-
motion of the LaFollette insurgents
from the ranks of the standing com-
mittees,. was given today by the Sen-
ate.
The vote was 64-11 and came after
five hours debate, confined largely to
the Republican side. Democratic lead-
ers interrupted occasionally but main-
ly to reiterate the rhesire to keep
clean of' the row within the Republi-
can ranks.
The real test as to whether the ma-
jority party was to complete organi-
ization of the Senate according to a
program determined upon immediately
after the 1924 elections came on the
proposal to remove Senator Ladd of
North Dakota, one of the insurgents,
from the chairmanship of the public
lands conmittee
Senator Stanfield, Republican, Ore-
gon, the majority candidate, was
elected, receiving 36 votes, to 13 for
Ladd and three for Senator Jtones,
Democrat, New Mexico. Twenty-fve
democrats voted present, as did Ladd
and Stanfield.
The Republican insurgents made no7
further effort to upset the organiza-
tion program.
With the organization of the new
Senate thus completed, Republican
leaders plan tomorrow to press for
confirmation of the nomination of
Charles B. Warren of Michigan to be
attorney general, and after that vote
to call up either the Isle of ines or
Lausanne treaty.
Crowded galleries looked down on
the somewhat unusual scene of the<
insurgents making a lone fight against1
their party organization. Democratic;
senators watched the proceedings;
with plain evidence of amusement1
which the spectators frequently shar-
ed.
Vice-president Dawe called the
Senate to order and held the chair
for about two hours. He then sur-
rendered to President pro-tempore
Moses and called it a day as far as'
the Senate was concerned. Neither
he nor Senator Moses undertook to
enforce rigidly the rule against de-
monstration from the gallery.+
ESSAYS FOR INLANOEK
DUE BEFORE MARCH 15
Essays to be entered in the contest
conducted by the Inlander, campus
literary magazine, will be accepted un-
til March 15, an extension of five days
in the time. This action has been
taken as a result of many requests for
more time from those writing essays.
A prize of ten dollars will be award-
ed by George Wah r, publisher of the
4iagazine, for the best informal es-
say of less than 2,500 words. The
manuscripts will be judged by Chris-
topher Morley of New York, who is a
noted writer and critic. Entries
should be sent to the Inlander, Press
building. *

Chicago, March 9.-Hell Maria, Vice-
President Charles G. Dawes' cocky
wire-haired fox terrier, which disap-
peared on inauguration day, .was
found in a suburb here.

Leaves

Michigan

Decoration Of Field ose b
oStarted For Auto Exhibit;
Opens Tomorrow Afternoon

COOIGWARDS
TARANTA TO PERU;
U, RGES PLEBISCITE

Decorators began work yesterday at nasiums for the J-Hop the last two
the Yost field house in preparation years.
for Ann Arbor's second automobile In addition to the opportunity stu-
show, this time for the benefit of the dents and townspeople will have to
University band, which will open at 1 see the largest an. most complete dis-
o'clock Wednesday afternoon to con- play of cars ever assembled under one
tinue through until 11 o'clock Satur- roof in Ann Arbor, the show will be
day night. At the same time work- of special interest to the members of
men were beginning to remove the the University due to the fact that the
large basketball floor, only a portion entire proceeds of the show are. to be
of which will be left as a stand for directed towards the support of the
the band which will give concerts University band.
night and Saturday afternoon. The Ann Arbor Automobile Dealers'
The vast iron work in the field association, the organization sponsor-
house is completely hidden by stream- ( ing the show, ha~s been untiring in its
ers and the ceiling is nearly a solid efforts to make the show a success
canopy of flags. The large dome and indications are that it will be one.
formed of flags of all nations will'be of the most successful ever held in the
in the center of the building while. state, outside of Detroit. The mcm-
Arabian colored draperies will cover hers of the, association are paying all'
the interior walls. The decorating is I the expenses of the enterprise, such
leing handled by George P. Johnson as (decorations, exhibits and publicity.
Flag and Decorating company of De- The band has charge of the sale and
troit, the same concern that decorated collection of tickets, which will sell
the Waterman and Barbour gym- for fitfy cents.
1JESSIE BONSTELLEjFRATERNITY BOARD
TO ADD RSS WOM ENiARRANGESBANQU ET

I
j

George E. LittleI
The head field coach of the Wolver-
ine football squad for the past three
dears left yesterday for Madison,
Wisconsin, where he will assume the
post of Athletic director at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin.
Coaeh Little during his stay helped
Michigan to win two Big Ten chain-
and in 1923, while his proteges fin-
ished high in the race last fall. But
two games have been dropped in the
entire Conference career of the Mich-
igan mentor.
H EACH 9AS"H EEM ENT'
Will Fai-or German Enurance 4o
League of Nations if No Special
Favors Are Granted
TALK SECURITY PACT
Paris, March 9.-(By A. P.)-The
position of France and Belgium when
the time comes to talk of security will
be that the guarantees must be real
and that all the European allies must
be satisfied. This is the substance of'
a virtual agreement reached by Paul
Hymans, the Belgium foreign minis-
ter, and Premier Herriot in their long
conversation this afternoon.
As to German membership in the
League of Nations it will be favored,
by both France and Belgium on con-
dition that no exceptional favors are
demanded by the Reich ,government.
They are willing that the Germans

Ticket Sates For TheC oosefangs
High" WIi Continue During
The Week

Vnern iers of l uuieiu'aiernil~y ICouncilI
Will he 1Invited(to, tAffair
at Ulliiont

MRS. MANSFIELD IN CASTi PLANNED FOR APRIL 1

shall have a place on
Germany takes her
League on the same
other members. This
the Berlin governmenti
many's being relieved
sibility of co-operating
members against any
violates the eventual

the council if
place in the
terms as the
means that if
insists on Ger-
of the respon-
with the other
nation which
security pact

Following the Matinee performance
Friday afternoon of Lewis BeachJs
comedy of college manners, "The
Goose Hangs High," by the Bonstelle
company at the Whitney. theatre, Miss
Jessie Bonstelle will address the
meeting of the American Association
of University Women that evening at
the home of Mrs. Edwin C. Goddard,
1212 hill street. The lecture will be
open to all members of the associa-
tion and certain invited guests, in-,
eluding the presidents of all the cam-
pus dramatic societies.
The public sale of tickets for "TIe
Goose Hangs High" will be held this
afternoon at the Whitney theatre box
office from 1 to 5 o'clock, and every
afternoon thpreafter during the same
hours until the performance. The
tickets are priced at $2 for the entire
main floor, $1.50 for the first, four
rows in the balcony, and $1 for the
remainder of the balcony.
The cast of "The Goose Hangs
High" will include besides Mrs.
Richard Mansfield in the role of the
mother, Walter Sherwin as the father,
Gilda Leary, Miss Bonstelle's new
leading lady, and Lester Vail as the
son.
Box holders for the performance
include Dean John R. Effinger and
Mrs. Effinger, Dean Joseph A. Burs-
ley and Mrs. Bursley, Professor Oscarj
J. Campbell and Mrs. Campbell, Mr.
and Mrs. James Inglis, Mrs. Henry C.
Adams, and Mrs. J. J. Walser.
HUBER TO TALK
ON "VESALIUS"
HERE TONIGHT'
"Vesalius, the Founder of M\odern
Anatomy" will be the subject of the
speech to be given by Prof. G. Carl
Huber, director of th-e anatomical
laboratories, at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in the west amphitheatre of the Med-
ical building. This lecture is the
third on the course dealing with med-
ical history which is being held un-
der the auspices of Alpha Omega Al-
pha, national honorary medical fra-
ternity.
Alpha Omega Alpha inaugurated .
this series of talks on the history of
medicine in order to accomiodate those
s tudents who desired to learn some-
thing bout the subject. There is no,
roomf or such a course on ( le cuririicu-
Iunm. The society plans to have one
lecture each month for the rest of
the school year.
While the speech t onight is espec-
ially designed for weicl st etiront i

department and Prof. Evans

Plais for ,n inter fraternity ban-
iiet to be held April 1 at tie Union,
and to be attended by members of
all the fraternities represented in the
Council, were announced at a meet-
ing of the Interfraternity Council yes-
terday afternoon at the Union.
F The faculty and alumni members
to serve on the newly formed judiciary
committee, which is to act as a per-
manent governing body of the coun-
cil, were announced. For the facul-
ty, Prof. W. A. Frayer of the history

her admission will be opposed.
The foreign minister also discussed
the commercial negotiation going on
between the two countries, and both
were confident that an early and sat-
isfactory settlement would be reached
in spite of the difficulties of conciliat-
ing all details of the divergent inter-
ests in economic affairs.
FROLIC FA VORS
WILL BE GIVEN
OUT TOMORROW
Faivors for the Frosh Frolic, to be
held lriday night at the Union, will
be distributed from 3 to 5 o'clock to-
morrow at. the Union. The cards in-
( 11uded(1 with the bids will be presented
at this time, and will entitle the hold-
er to a combination purse and card
case of black leather.
Pans for the decorations have been
completed by the committee under
;=arry Nelly, '281E, and will consist. of
palms, placed about the ballroom,
balloons of all colors suspended fromh
the ceiling, and a large crystal ball,,
reflecting lights over the heads of the l
dancers. A large '28, made of flowers,
-- ..: 1,.7. ~ 1 l Sra ..f f;r.atl.. n.4

Hol-

ADVISES PUBLIC REFERENDUM
TO SETTLE TACNA-ARICA
NATIONALITY
CHILE SATISFIED
Deiision Rendered in Accordance With
Protocol of 192; Peruvian
Ei--oy Silent
Washington, March 9.-(By A. P.)-
President Coolidge today handed
down his arbitral award in the long
standing controversy between Chile
and Peru over possession of Tacna
and Arica, calling for a plebiscite by
1 which these provinces shall determine
their own nationality, and holding
that the town and province of Taranta
shall revert to Peru.
Both governments, in signing the
arbitration protocol on June20, 1922,
under which the award was made,
( agreed to abide by the President's de-
cision. Comment oni its povision was
withheld tonight at the Peruvian le-
gation, but gratification was expressed
unofficially in' Chilian circles. Robert
Lansing, former secretary of state and
counsel for Chile in the dispute, de-
clared that "from beginning to end,
the award is a complete vindication
of the course pursued," by that gov-
ernment during the last 30 years.
Theldecision, set foth in a docu-
ment of about22,000 words, was hand-
ed to the Chilian and Peruvian am-
bassadors today by Mr. Coolidge in
the- presene of seretary Kellogg.
At the same time unofficial summaries
were being presented to the foreign
offices of the two governments by the
American ministers at Santiago and
Lima.
STUDENTS MUST
CALL FOR MAIL
WITHIN 5 DA YS
Some students have failed to claim
mail which has been listed for them
in The Daily Official Bulletin, and
University officials request that they
call promptly or it will be returned to
the sender. Any mail which remains
in the office for five days after the
publication of that list will be re-
turned.
The University is co-operating with
the local postal officials to facilitate
delivery and stop delay in mail which
is addressed "in care of the University
of Michigan." Mail for faculty mem-
bers is being delivered by the Uni-
versity messengers, and that for the
students is being listed daily in the
Bulletin.
Students are requested to giv the
date of publication notice of their mail
when applying at the office of the Sec-
retary.
CRYSTALLI NE STRUCTURIE
IS RAMSOELLS SUBJECT
L. S. Ramsdell of the mineralology
department will speak before the
Physics colloquium at 4:15 o'clock
tomorrow in room 1041, new Physics
'building. His subject will be "The
Validity of Crystal Determinations."
Everyone who is interested in the
topic is invited to attend.
Reed To Address
Municipal Heads
Prof. T. H. Reed of the political sci-
ence department, director of the bu-
reau of government, will address a
number of municipal officils of Cin-
cinnati, Ohio, today in that city.
Cincinnati recently adopted a city
manager form of government which
will be placed in effect there shortly.
Professor Reed will speak on "The
Fanctions of a City Manager "He will
return to Ann A'bor this evening.

Adams To Address

COMMITTEES START, FOUR DAY
CAMPA1IN FOR KIEY KITCHEN
WITH GENERALMASS "MEETING
BOOTHS TO RECEIVE DONATIONS; G ROUP
CONTRIBUTIONS ,WILL BE MADE
BY FRATERNITIES
By George W. Davis
With $4,000 to be raised in four days, the University starts its drive
for the "Student Friendship fund today. Booths will be found at many con-
venient points on the campus, all committees will be set in full swing,
and at a general mass meeting at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium the whole purpose of the Student Friendship fund will
be explained by Ray Legate, executive secretary of the national organiza-
tion.
The booths, which will receive contributions from the campus in gen-
eral, will be located at the Engineering arch, in front of the Library and
of Angell hall, at Tappan and University halls,, at the corner of State street

brook of the law school will serve; for
the alumni, hackley Butler and Char-
les W. Grahami.
While definite imormation regard-
ing the speakers at the sprming ban-
quet is not available it is expected1
that 11. Duane Livingston, ex-presi-
dent of the national Interfraternity
council,; will deliver the leading ad-
dress. Two faculty speakers will
definitely be named later. Tickets will
sell for two dollars.
BENEOICKS WILL OFR
FIRST LECTURE TODA
"Some Views on the Kinetic Theory
of Matter" will be the subject of the
lecture by Dr. Carl Benedicks in roomn
1042, east Engineering building at
4:15 o'clock today. Dr. Benedicks is
director of the Metallographic Insti-
tute at Stockholm, Sweden, and is an
eminent authority on mnetallurgy.
IDr. Benedicks will speak at the De-
troit chapter of the American Society
for Steel Treating tonight, and tomor-
row he will speak here again at the
same time and place, on "The Theory
of IIigh Speed Steel."
GRET LAKS FORESTRY
D1ICTORSPEAKS TODAY
Coming here under the auspices of
the forestry department, Raphael Zon,
director of the Great Lakes Forest
Experiment station will give a lecture
of a popular nature at 4:30 o'clock to-
day in room f'-2:14, Natural Science
building, on "The Foest as a Plant
Gomum ',ity."
Cabot Named Head
Of Medical Grouvl

Contributions by mail to the
Student Friendship fund should
be addressed under that title to
The Daily at the Press building
or to the Michigan Union, where
they will be delivered to the stu-
dent committee in charge of the
drive for the University.
FACULTY TO MEET
STUD0ENT5TONIGHT~
Informal Mixer Will Be Held at 8:00
O'clock in Main Assembly
Hall of Union'
STARTED LAST YEAR
As planned by the committee at the
Union, the student-faculty mixer to
be held a 8 o'clock tonight in the main
assembly hall of the building will be
a large, informal gathering for the
purpose of enabling students and
their professors to meet each other
out of school hours. The opportuni-
ty offered in the classroom of becom-
ing acquainted with members of the
faculty was felt to be too limited and
for this reason the Union has spon-
sored the mixer tonight.
A mixer of this kind was held last
year and proved a distinct success,
numerous requests having been receiv-
ed by the Union to hold another one
this year.
Reule Kenyon's orchestra will fur-
nish music throughout the evening,
playing a number of selections. Prof.
Evans Holbrook of the Law school
has consented to give a humorous
reading and Shirley Smith, secretary
of the University, will also speak.
B. W. Wheeler of the history depart-
ment will give another short talk,
telling of the relations between stu-
dents and faculty at the University of
Southern California where his father
is president
Besides the several speeches, Jo-
seph Ellis, '27A, and Ch'arles Wolcott,
"27, have arranged to play a piano
duet and Burton Hyde,i '27M, will give
a solo on the marimbaphone Hyde
played in Sousa's band some time ago.
After the regular entertainment is
over, refreshments will be served by
the Union.
ENSIAN DRIVE CLOSES
WITH ?52NBOOKS SOLO
Orders for 2,923 copies of the 1925
'Ensian have been placed by students
this year. This falls short, by 85
books, of the mark set by the 'Ensian
last year.
As the exact number of books sold
have been ordered, it is now imposs-~
ible to obtain copies.
I ,,i ..

and North University avenue, and in
Barbour gymnasium. Donations may
be made either in cash or by check,
and for the latter special Student
Friendship fund blank checks will be
available.
At a meeting of the Interfraternity
council yesterday afternoon, the poli-
cy of one whole donatiom from each
organization was adopted. This will
avoid the misunderstanding that oc-
curred last year, when the plan of
fraternities contributing as groups
was not entirely in force. The amount
given by each house will be recogniz-
ed in The Daily as the drive progess-
es.
The quota to be raised-$4,000-is
the same amount that was collected
last year, and will continue to support
the University of Michigan Student
kitchen at Kiev, Russia, where for
three months during 1924, 2,200 Rus-
sian university students procured al-
most their sole sustenance. The av-
erage price of a meal at this kitchen
was a little more than five cents.
Miss Margaret Quayle, national sec-
retary 'of the fund, announced yester-
day that a letter from the American
relief director in this section of Rus-
sia has reported that more than 2,000
students ae still in "desperate
straits," and that for the University
to make further operation of the l it-
chen possible is a practical necessity
for the students, who are still bur-
dened by unfavorable social and eco-
nomic conditions.
"The gratitude of these Russian stu-
dents in Kiev is pathetic," declared
Miss Quayle before the Interfraternity
council yesterday. "They sent us a
photograph, showing the sign they
have erected over your kitchen, and
which says in Russian, 'This is the
kitchen supported by the University of
Michigan, of the United States.' They
are anxious to display their gratitude
in every possible way.
"We can keep a student in school
in Russia on $5 a semester," said
Miss Quayle, "and can supply his
meals for $1.26 a week. We are work-
ing under difficult circumstances, how-
ever( for the Communist party does
not approve of our activities. They
favor members of the Communist par-
ty, and Communist professors in the
universities receive from $150 to $200
per month, while non-Communist pro-
fessors have a salary range of from
$16 to $35 a month."
Ray Legate, who arrived in Ann
Arbor yesterday, and will address the
campus mass meeting this afternoon,
returned to America last September,
after having spent four years in re-
lief work among Russian students.
In his speech this afternoon, he will
outline the purpose, activities, and re-
sults of the Student Friendship fund
activities.
Among the advisory directors of the
fund are Herbert Hoover, Pres. Er-
nest D. Burton of Chicago university,
Miss Ada Vomstock, president of Rad-
cliff college, and 'Pres. Livingston Far-
rand of Cornell university. Mr. Hoo-
ver, in a statement last year concern-
ing the Student Friendship fund, said,
"I am much gratified to know that the
American Student Friendship fund
proposes to continue the same work
in the principal university centers as
it has during the last two years in
connection with the American Relief

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