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March 05, 1925 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-03-05

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THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 19

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

._ -

STE ARNS WATCHES
COOLIDGE RENEW OT fOfIE
OAT OFOFC

THE SEVEN AGES OF COOLIDGE

Ittlatute Friend a ud Supporter
When President Takes
Vows

N ear

ADVISOR TO EXECUTIVE'
When President Coolidge took the
oath of office yesterday, near at hand
Was a man, a little under medium
height, rather portly, and slightly
gray, who was thinking even though
not saying; "I told you so."
That man is Frank W. Stearns,I
friend, counselor and ardent support-
er of Mr. Coolidge. He sometimes is
described as the one who "discovered"
Mr. Coolidge, but he, himself, makes
no such claim, holding that Mr. Cool-
idge needed no discovering.
Mr. Stearns is a Boston merchant
and makes no pretense of being a
pioliticion. Yet he was the first to
predict that some day Calvin Cool-
idge would sit in the White house
and yesterday was the day of days
for the Boston man because he saw
not only a prediction but a dream
come true when Mr. Coolidge became
President by vote of the American
people
Calvin Coolidge as President of the
Massachusetts Senate in 1915 first
came under the notice of Mr. Stearns.
lie represented the Northampton dis-
trict, and Amherst College, of which
Mr. Stearns then was and still is a
trustee, is near Northampton. The
college was constructing a sewerage
system and the trustees wanted a con-
nection with the city system of,
Northampton. An act of the legisla-
ture was necessary, and Mr. Stearns
sent a representative to see Senator
Coolidge. It' was just three= weeksI
before the close of the session, and
the legislative calendar was jammed.
The representative of the trustees
made his plea for the legislation, hop-
ing for favorable response despite the
early ending of the session. Mr. Cool-,
idge said little and promised nothing.
The representative was bitterly dis-
appointed; and when the report off
the interview was made to Mr.
Stearns, he was as he, himself admits,
"plain mad."
When the legislature convened1

.HIGI POiNTS IN LF E
OF CHARLJESG: #A
? 1865-Dorn at Marietta,.Oho
1884-Graduated from
etta College.
F 1886-After attending Cin -
nati Law School, was adminted
.>to the bar.
h' 1887-Moved to Lincoln, N6-
braska and began law practice;
became public utility counSelr
and organizer.
hs:1889-Married Caro P. Myzier
of Cincinnati.
1896-Attracted n o t i c e of-
Mark Harrna and -managed Mc-
Kinley's Illinois canmpa1gri.
1897-Appointed Comptroller
, of the Currency by President
McKinley.
I M1902-Founded Central Trust,
Company of Illinois.
1917-Commissioned Lieuten-
ant-Colonel in the wowhi
IUnique Position and rose to be Brigadier General
By F in charge of purchAses for:the ii
SI Flled By Taft i American Ex editionafy Forece.,
1921-Appointed Director of;
I To William Howard Taft goes the theBudget.

lars, makes no effort to enter into anyj
of the public affairs with which the;Coolidge s Career Shows Love
President is dealing. He scarcely I'ef
ever attends any of the conferencertsr
that take place at the White House.
H le knows all the cabinet members, (alvin Coolidge is the thirtieth of the Coolidge family gre
but seldom talks business with them.
lie is acquainted with Republican President of the United States and tudy and practice law, the
leaders in the Senate and House, lhtijthe sixth Vice-President to succeed for generations have been
leadrs n te SnateandHoue, ixtThe father of Calvin ran a
when he goes to the Capitol h'e will be to the higher office through the death toe be bein a a
store besides being a farmer
found sitting in the gallery, and gen- of a President. In the Commonwealth President Coolidge was
erally when the President acts on a o, Massachusetts, where he spent Independence Day, 1872, at F
matter it will be found that he dis-
cussed it with Mr. Stearns after and more than twenty years in public of- Vermont, a small town,
notsed b tore the Mrc t n a t e an d ice, the nam e of Calvin Coolidge w as am ong thb hills, and twel
nMr. Stearns likes to be near the a synonym for independence, rugged from a railroad. Incidental
President, ut he does not like to pro- honesty, simplicity of habits, courage, been the birthplace of four G
ject himself into the limelight of pub- inflexible devotion to duty, and the one United States Senator an
licity that constantly plays on the austere virtues generally associated ongressmen.
White House. He says he never madeIwith the pioneer stock whence he Mr. Coolidge received his
a speech in his life, and never intends sprang. It also became synonymous ucational training in the pub]
to; and when the Union League Club for success at the polls, because hle of his home town. He wen
of New York recently listed him for never had been defeated for office. herst after preparing at tl
nto r h The ancestors of President Coolidge River Academy, at Ludlow,
metropolis at once to squelch the pro- settled in Massachusetts about 1630, and St. Johnsburg Acade
osal. or tern years after the arrival of the worked his way through sch(
S'i Mayflower and the Pilgrims. A pion- prescribed four years. He
"adI'lltel th i 'm ick," he a idon eer community on the Charles river, mitted to the bar in 1897.
me for a sech."h a known as Watertown, saw the first twenty-three years old at 1
me for a tspeech' John and Mary Coolidge. Some fifty I 'Where other occupants of
According to Washington society years later, the Coolidges, who lived President's office found ti
editors who are sticklers for form, there, removed to the hilly country heavy on their hands, Mr.
Mr. Stearns resides in Boston, but to across the Connecticut river, now after he went to Washingtol
the newspaper correspondents that are known as Vermont. Here the sturdy u) his duties kept pretty bi
assigned to the White House it would ( pioneers invested some acres from the He was the first Governor
seem that he lives at the White House wilderness and placed them under cul- sachusetts to submit an
and frequently makes trips to Boston. tivation. Even until the present head budget to the Legislature.
He may be seen about the executive
offices most any day, wearing his hat
as though he had just arrived or was
Ion the point of departing, but he
seldom does either. Ile is as ap-
proachable as an Indiana politician,
and will talk at length on his favorite

tock
w Up to
Coolidges
farmers.
country
-.
born on
Plymouth,
situated
ve miles
ly it has
overnors,
d several!
early ed-
4ie schoolj
t to Am-I
ie Black
Vermont,
Amy, and{
ool in the
was ad-,
He was
the time.
the Vice-
me ,often
Coolidge,
n to take
Lusy.
of Mas-
executive

MILESTONES WHICH MARK
THE CAIIEER OV COOLIDGE
1872-Born at Plymouth, Ver-
mont.
1895-Graduated from Am-
herst college.j
1897-Admitted to the bar and
began practice at Northhamp-
ton, Mass.
1899-Elected to Northampton
city council, and served subse-
quently as city solicitor and
county clerk.
1905-Married Grace Anna
Goodhue of Burlington, Ver
mont.
1906-Elected state represen-
tative.
1909-Elected Mayor of North-
ampton.
1911-Elected to Massachu-
setts state senate, and later be-
came president of the Senate.
1915-Elected lieutenant gov-
ernor of Massachusetts.
1918-Elected governor,
1920-Elected vice-president
of the United States.
1923-Became President upon
the death of President Harding.
1924-Elected President by
the largest plurality in history.

i
i
i

unique distinction of being the only I m3-CUi1 IWeuorp
man who ever was called upon to tions ex erts conimittee t
Ftframed the DaWe spla.
take the oath of office as President, 1924-Elected Vice-residenLt.
and later to administer it. Mr. Taft
was inaugurated on March 4, 1909, -
and yesterday as Chief Justice of the P
IteIItsh diisee h Pennsylvania avenue iu. Waahing
United States, be. administered the ton was thronged with people.at6
same pledge to Calvin Coolidge. early hour yesterday, mornimg
ItilifIif~illIIIII~lllll[ Il IIIII[[II l tu tilIIIIIitilillfill tutt il"illIfOlilfi
i=
Gace Van,-Schnc
I- I
BrillanlyClorteud
r pb " A
.x.1I I
.iuur
Grace Van Se/wick
Designor
=-308 flarynard St Phota:t d-d.
i~Twvo doors from 1laeatic.
: IIIIIIIIIst IIfIlI1I~ItIIIUIIIII~lIU11fotlp1XNlll

1

ii

again the next winter, however; topic-Calvin Coolidge-but diligent
Senator Coolidge without a word took inquiry has revealed not one single,
up, the legislation and put it throughi. instance where lie ever disclosed all
The quiet and efficient way in which Iadministration secret..
the hill Was .handled attracted the Frank W. Stearns has the greatest
attention of Mr. Stearns, and from possible admiration for and confidence
that beginning developed a warm in Calvin Coolidge, he honestly be-
friendship that has had much to do lieves him to be the greatest natural
with bringing Mr. Coolidge to the point executive produced by the present
he reached yesterday. j generation, and he is satisfied to stand
It was at Frank Stearn's urging that on the side, assist where he can, and
Mr. Coolidge become a candidate for watch the fulfillment of the expecta-
lieutenant governor. It was with F tions lie developed ten years ago.
Frank Stearn's aid that he was elected
governor. It was Frank Stearns who
backed the move to obtain the Repub- INAUGURAL CEREMONY
lican presidential nomination for Mr. OF DOUBLE INTEREST
Coolidge in 1920. That move failed, TO ADJOINING STATES
but it won the Massachusetts gover-
nor the Vice-Presidential nomination. , asuachusetts and her neighbor
Vig election with Warren G. Harding'Msahsts-adhrniho
Hiseletio wih Wrre U.haringVermont founid *a(double community
followed, and Mr. harding's death of interest in the inauguration cere-
made him President. And in the re- inonies yesterday. The Vermont born
cent pre-convention and election cam- I man, Calvin Coolidge, who became
paign the Boston nan had quiet but, Governor of Massachusetts, found
the camipaign managers say, a not in- hear hint when lie took the oath as
Thus did Frank Stearns come to be President a Massachusetts born ilan,
called by some "the Colonel House Franklin S. Billings, who is the pres-
of the Coolidge administration." Those ent governor of Vermont, and who
who know Mr. Coolidge and Mr. was that state's chief representative
, at the inaugural.
uuo-Irwvrhnti ,h+r

t
t j
e
_I
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PHONE 3487-M

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

I

Zearns est , owever,(teciare there
Is little comparison between the part
of Mr. Stearns in the Coolidge admin-
istration and the role of Colonel
House when Woodrow Wilson was in
the White House.
Mr. Coolidge's best friend, Mr.
Stearns, who now practically has re-
tired and is worth several million dol-
DRUGS

Just Received
Pipes
C niai'ettl

Washington, March 4.--All build-
ings near the Capitol and along the
route of the parade were crowded
with persons witnessing the inaugu-
ration. A large number of spectators
were accommodated in the govern-
ment buildings nearby.
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